Win 11: Most enterprise workstations don't meet the new system requirements

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by RickAgresta, Oct 1, 2021.

  1. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Windows 11 could be a very slow and heavy-lifting rollout for enterprise organizations.
    If a new survey by IT asset management company Lansweeper is correct, it looks like many enterprise firms could be on Windows 10 for many years to come – or at least until they undergo major hardware refreshes.
    Lansweeper reckons its Windows 11 readiness data shows that 55% of workstations can't be upgraded to Windows 11 due to Microsoft's stringent minimum hardware requirements.

    As ZDNet's Ed Bott has noted, a large amount of pre-2018 hardware doesn't meet the requirements, including kit with relatively new 7th Gen Intel Core CPUs or first-generation AMD Zen CPUs. Microsoft argues the move will boost reliability, security, and compatibility

    SEE: Can your PC upgrade to Windows 11? This Microsoft app could help you find out

    Lansweeper said its Windows 11 readiness data is based on a scan of about 30 million Windows devices from 60,000 organizations, making it a significant sample of enterprise hardware.

    Specifically, Lansweeper found that only 44.4% of machines would meet Microsoft's Windows 11 CPU requirements and only 52.5% would meet its Trusted Platform Module 2.0 requirements. Most (91.05%) do, however, meet RAM requirements.

    The hardware requirements include that a PC needs at least 4GB of memory and 64GB of storage; UEFI secure boot must be enabled; the graphics card must be compatible with DirectX 12 or later, with a WDDM 2.0 driver; and a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) 2.0 must be included.

    Another problem for enterprises, assuming they want to upgrade to Windows 11, is that Microsoft's minimum hardware requirements also apply to virtual machine platforms such as Microsoft HyperV, VMware and Oracle VM Virtual Box.

    Lansweeper says the TPM requirements for VMs are "grim" and generally "less optimistic" for VMs across all requirements.

    "While [VM] CPU compatibility is slightly higher at 44.9%, our research shows that only 66.4% has enough RAM," Lansweeper says in a blogpost.

    The TPM 2.0 requirement means there could be a whole lot of work that system admins need to do to ensure they meet the grade.

    "For TPM the news is grim, only 0.23% of all virtual workstations have TPM 2.0 enabled. This isn't completely a surprise, TPM has never been required for Windows and while TPM passthrough (vTPM) exists in order to give virtual machines a TPM, it is rarely used. Meaning that most VM workstations will need to be modified to get a vTPM before they can upgrade to Windows 11."

    It also estimated that 98% of TPMs would "fail to upgrade if Microsoft creates a server operating system with similar requirements in the future."

    LINK: https://www.zdnet.com/article/windo...SAGE_ID}&cid={$contact_id}&eh={$CF_emailHash}
     
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  2. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    I feel this article. Due to how my department is funded, I have to run between a 7 to 8 year lifecycle on most of my workstations. Come Oct of 25, I'll still have a significant number of systems out there that won't meet spec for Win 11. The burden of increasing how fast we cycle out systems is going to be significant. :/
     
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  3. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    I've heard that my office is moving toward virtual desktops or something like that. I don't know if that means they'll be issuing us dumb terminals or what. In any case, I'm not sure what impacts Windows 11 might have on that plan.
     
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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Yes! Bring back the VAX and AllIn1, and RS/1. Green-screen vacuum-tube monitors, all wired. WooHoo!!
    EDIT: in his best Mr. Rogers voice, RA says "Can you say dial-up speeds?"
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2021
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  5. SyncRaven

    SyncRaven Mobile Deity

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    I was just thinking yesterday that I probably used Windows 95 longer than anyone.
    Used it probably until 2005.
    Back then the internet didn't change much so I could get away with using old web browsers.
    I just liked the simplicity and speed of the OS.

    Now I use mostly Linux, although I have a heavily upgraded PowrMac G4 that is still kicking for fun too.

    Probably most companies should be switching to Linux at this point. You could get 10x the time with the same workstations by leaving the Windows upgrade cycle.
     
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  6. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    I'm gonna have to disagree with you on this. I manage systems for a living, and along with it the people that use said systems. Linux is not even an afterthought for our end users. The training costs alone, as well as continual training for all incoming users would be prohibitive off the top, and not only kill, but bury any supposed savings you think come with going this way. Your 10x the time with the same workstations? Come on. You think people buy a system and use it for 1 year or two years? Thus Linux should give 10 or 20 years? If you think that using a 2010 or 2000 processor has any merit in the workplace when time most certainly equals $, you'll be laughed back out the door you just walked through. A 10 year old system, being used daily isn't without need for repairs too. You're not going to get new parts. You're not going to get paid support on this hardware without paying through the nose. Line of business applications have increasing demands on hardware, many of which would outstrip the meager performance of such aged systems. The cost of employing Linux administrators is generally more expensive than employing Windows administrators too.

    Sure, if you want to personally putter along on old devices on a Linux distro, by all means do so. But managing a fleet of said systems, and the users that go with them, while expecting parallel productivity and maintaining the cost savings you think would come with this, is nothing more than a wild pipe dream that isn't going to bear fruit.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2021
  7. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Yeah, I don't know that much about this stuff, but I do listen to my brother-in-law who is the CTO of a large financial firm in NY. I'll have to ask him about the thought of Linux. Going way back, I can remember when a bunch of companies popped up like Red Hat, whose purpose was to 'corporatize' Linux and make it a consistent, secure package; but I suspect that that ends up making it just another cycle like Windows, with similar, but possibly a bit lower, costs.
     
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  8. z22 2006 User

    z22 2006 User BHOT's Own Fluffy

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    My local community college has Redhat programs, but I honestly don't know what it entails.
     
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