Wifi woes - the home router setup kind

Discussion in 'Other Device Manufacturers' started by Green Loontern, Jun 30, 2006.

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  1. Green Loontern

    Green Loontern Gustatus similis pullus

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    Last night I bought a 802.11b/g router so that I could share my desktop's cable broadband connection with my TX.

    When I plug in the router between the modem and the desktop, the desktop no longer sees the Internet. However, the TX can connect to the Internet with no problems.

    Any wisdom to share before I get on the phone to my ISPs braindead Customer Disservice Dept.?

    The details: Connection is Rogers Hi-Speed Internet over cable (Canadian) through a Motorola SURFboard 5100 cable modem. Router is a D-Link DI-624 AirPlus Xtreme G. Desktop is a 2-yr. old Daewoo running WinXP SP2.
     
  2. holvoetn

    holvoetn Still a moderator ...

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    Do you have the desktop set to DHCP ? What connection is used between Desktop and router ?
     
  3. r0k

    r0k Dazed

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    Chances are you had the desktop set to dhcp back when you had it plugged into your cable modem. You weren't using a usb connection to your cable modem were you? If so, you may need to disable some drivers that are still trying to establish the connection via usb in order to get the pc to wake up and smell the ethernet connection. When you plug into the router, do you see an icon on the taskbar that indicates you are connected? When you type "ipconfig" in a cmd window, you see an ip address for your desktop machine right (besides 0.0.0.0 or 169.254.something)?
     
  4. Green Loontern

    Green Loontern Gustatus similis pullus

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    The connection between the cable modem and the desktop is an ethernet cable.

    The connection that works for the TX but not the desktop is: ethernet cable between the cable modem and the router's WAN port, and ethernet cable between the router's LAN port #1 and the desktop. Note that I tried the other three LAN ports too.

    When the router is plugged in, the icon on the taskbar indicates that I am not connected. Also, Rogers (my ISP) has "Self Healing" software running on my desktop which pops up an error message saying that I failed the Connectivity test.

    Unfortunately, I'm at work now here in GMT+5 land, so I can't check my IP address.

    I hadn't thought to check for DHCP. Isn't that for dial-up? But if I am set for DHCP, it's likely because my ISP wants it this way to maintain the connection. If so, there has got to be a workaround, no?
     
  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    this's probably a dumb question, but is it possible that the router is set to WiFi only?
     
  6. holvoetn

    holvoetn Still a moderator ...

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    No, the DHCP should be handled by your router. Now another stupid question: is your router capable of doing so ? I suppose it does ...
     
  7. Green Loontern

    Green Loontern Gustatus similis pullus

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    Well, the router is brand-new, and certainly should be capable of dealing with DHCP. I haven't made any configuration changes to it yet, because there's no communication between it and my desktop. It should also be able to communicate with wired devices out of the box, because that's how you're supposed to confugure it...
     
  8. holvoetn

    holvoetn Still a moderator ...

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    OK, as suggested before by r0k, open a command window (Start - Run - cmd).

    1) Type "ipconfig /all". What does it say ?
    2) Checkout the documentation of your router. What is the default IP address ? Usually it is 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 ...
    3) If the IP address of the router is determined, see if the IP address of the computer is in the same sunrange as the router (102.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x)
     
  9. WyreNut

    WyreNut Palm Aficionado

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    GL, did you run through the "Wizard" when you powered up and connected the router?

    Did you tell the router to "clone" the MAC address of your Network Card in the PC?

    Just a few suggestions...

    WyreNut
     
  10. DragonHunter

    DragonHunter Bow, bow, bow, bow

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    http://www.grc.com/securitynow

    There are a ton of podcasts (with full transcripts) that will give you the ins and outs of NAT routers, how to configure them, wi-fi security....I really highly recommend them, even after you get your initial problem fixed.
     
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