Why smartwatches failed

Discussion in 'Wearables' started by scjjtt, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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  2. internetpilot

    internetpilot Flying Dog (...duh...)

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    I think the biggest problem is that people are looking for too much functionality from smartwatches, and I don't think the manufacturers properly managed expectations. I approached the smartwatch purely from an exercise tracking point of view. My wife had a Fitbit and then a Garmin Vivofit "watch" and I wanted something similar, but with more features. I'm a techie nerd, but the wife isn't. So, for me, all the extra features that came with a smartwatch were just a bonus above and beyond an exercise tracker, but after experiencing these extra features, I was hooked on the platform. Most people did not approach smartwatches from my perspective, and instead viewed them as a smartphone for your wrist, hence the common disappointment after discovering it's really nothing of the sort. It's a little surprising to me because dumbwatches are pretty dumb, so I'm a little surprised that people aren't more impressed with smartwatches.

    I use my smartwatch (Asus Zenwatch 2) literally 24 hours/day. I use it as a sleep monitor at night (only costs like 5% of the battery), I charge it up while getting ready in the morning, and charge it up again while winding down the evening, during dinner, while washing dishes, etc. I don't know about the other smartwatches, but the Zenwatch 2 charges ridiculously fast. Asus advertises that it will charge from 0-60% in just 15 minutes, and that's been my experience. A quick 10 or 15 minutes on the charger and my watch almost always ends up fully charged and rarely dips below 70%. So in a world of rechargeable everything, my smartwatch battery is probably the least of my rechargeable worries. I find it interesting that people widely complain about smartwatch batteries only lasting a day, but the ridiculously popular action cameras (GoPro, SJCAM, etc.) batteries typically last for under an hour of use, which is just ridiculous...but strangely acceptable???

    If there's one thing I've learned about technology and me over the decades (including a career in IT), the masses and me have very different opinions/preferences when it comes to technology. So it really wouldn't surprise me that smartwatches are supposedly failing. So did Palm. So did WindowsCE. So did the "prosumer" superzoom camera. So did the 8-track tape. Okay, kidding on the 8-track... But the moral of the story is don't like what I do. Or if you do, I wouldn't advise getting too attached to it.
     
  3. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    I think IP nailed it. I asked my father and he said he uses it mostly for notifications so he doesn't have to pull out his phone and at the gym for heart-rate and steps.

    But to be fair, he didn't go out to specifically buy it, he got it free with his Galaxy 7.
     
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  4. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Read more from the NYTimes here. :vbrolleyes:
     
  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    I saw this and was going to post it in the ' smart watches are dead' thread. :)

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
     
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  6. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    And the move was made. :vbsmile:
     
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