Whatever happened to the Chromebook?

Discussion in 'General Smartphone/Handheld/Wearable Discussion' started by LandSurveyor, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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  2. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    Will have to agree. Bad idea. Thanks for explaining that to me.
     
  3. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    No worries. Sorry it wasn't a useful lead!

    One thought, netbooks are quickly and swiftly dying out, maybe some judicious bargain hunting could lead to a potential option with Ubuntu preinstalled? I know Dell used to sell netbooks with Ubuntu.
     
  4. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    No, I appreciate your input. You told me exactly what I needed to know.

    Jig, you have a point. On the previous PC, I ran Linux but was using the Chromium browser. It worked pretty well but this one has Firefox on it already so I'll probably just keep using that.

    I buy all my music on CDs still so I am not only not using online services for that, I also need to be able to store the ripped tunes so I can put them on different devices when I choose.

    I also take quite a few photos for personal and sometimes work use and need to be able to keep those as well.

    Combine those with my correspondence and I need to have considerable on-board storage. Wouldn't mind the cloud for backup but I still want my stuff local.
     
  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    I'm still running my Netbook: Acer AOA150-1570 with Windows XP and Office 2007. Back in the day, I paid $200 for it and feel I really got my money's worth. I still take it on trips so I can manage media with it (photos, videos, etc.). I considered loading another OS on it (and have experimented with dual booting), but in my circumstances, nothing beats WinXP. The only problem I have with it -- Netflix stutters. Boo hoo. :)

    Oh, why did I bring that up? Sorry, I wasn't trying to salt any wounds. :rolleyes: I think I just got carried away. My point (if I had one) was that I think you're on the right path using older laptops (or netbooks). One of the main issues you mentioned in your OP was connecting it to your phone. I failed to ask you what you meant -- are you trying to tether (for internet access), sync data, or copy data? If you're tethering, maybe WiFi tethering would work better than USB tethering.
     
  6. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    I meant for transferring data. I haven't had much need for tethering yet.

    It seems to work pretty well to repurpose older Windows laptops with some version of Linux. It's lighter and works faster plus it doesn't seem to "load up" over time. I just hope I don't have this problem again. I would simply transfer my files via my SD card but it's a pain to remove the protective case AND the phone's back just to dump a few photos.
     
  7. SGosnell

    SGosnell (retired) Palm Pilot

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    Linux Mint is tweaked Ubuntu, changed from purple to green. It's made to feel more like Windows, and has codecs added so it will play most media formats out of the box. I'm not thrilled with that much green, but lots of people do use it, and it's the fastest-growing Linux distro, AFAIK.
     
  8. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    I'm bringing back an old one but it came to mind because I saw the ads for the Chromebox and some laptops running Chrome "OS" here on BH. I read some other discussions about it and I have to ask what is compelling here for the user?

    Following up on this discussion, I have here an older Dell laptop on which XP is now barely crawling but it's loaded with Mint and runs quite briskly. In fact, If I can get the hang of ripping music and transferring it to my Galaxy in a useable format, there's not much else that I need.

    Why buy a new laptop or Box that costs about what other lower-priced laptops cost when Mint and other Linux distros are free and are complete, independent operating systems? It's good for Google but doesn't seem like much of a deal for the end user.
     
  9. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    If you want a cheap notebook and don't want Windows, I'd install some variety of Linux on a bargain-basement Windows PC, or maybe just get an Asus TF300 with a keyboard dock, instead of getting a Chromebook. Everything I've read about the Chrome OS suggests that the lack of local storage and programs is quite limiting, and it just isn't 1/10th as focused or polished or useful as Google's recent Android versions. I'd call it a half-hearted side project from a company that could do better if it tried (like Apple TV for Apple).

    Chromebooks aren't even that cheap. The ones at Best Buy range from $380 to $550. That's no cheaper than similar-quality machines with a full Windows OS. All that bloatware that cheap Windows PCs are known for? It subsidizes the machine, and to my knowledge, Chromebooks can't take advantage of similar subsidization. So that counterbalances the cheaper OS it has. Thing is, it's a lot easier to take bloat off a Windows machine (or replace Windows with Linux entirely) than it is to add functionality to a Chromebook.

    Linux Mint has a XP-esque start menu; Ubuntu doesn't have anything like that to my knowledge. As a consequence, some Windows users over at NotebookReview who are screaming bloody murder about the replacement of the Windows start menu with a full-screen, tablet-esque start screen are threatening to move to Mint. I suspect it'll become the dominant Linux distro when Windows 8 is released, dominated by people who hate the mobile-device-ization of desktop OSes (Apple and Microsoft are both doing this in one way or another).
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2012
  10. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    Exactly, that's why I don't think Chromebooks make sense. If they were 1/2 or even a bit more than a bare-bones netbook it would be one thing; but they're not. And they have almost no on-board storage.
     
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