Whatever happened to the Chromebook?

Discussion in 'General Smartphone/Handheld/Wearable Discussion' started by LandSurveyor, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    ASUS Chromebook Flip C302CA-DHM4 12.5-Inch Touchscreen Intel Core m3 64GB storage, 4GB RAM ($404.99 after VISA Checkout)
     
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  2. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    I think my Chromebook experience that I'm looking for is summed up like this:

    Give me a laptop form-factor, with the UI experience of my Samsung Note 8. Implement the full chrome browser into Android, and forget ChromeOS. A Wacom screen that supports touch, and stylus, a seamless UI as it simply uses apps, and has a full fledged browser.

    The disjointed movement between ChromeOS apps and Android apps leaves me feeling like I'm using Windows 8. It's just plain ugly, and unstable. One of the reasons ChromeOS is bringing in Android apps - ChromeOS apps are far and few in between. You've got a zillion Android apps, and a handful of the former. Just bury the dead horse, and move on.

    That's my perspective, and likely the reason I still find no delight in using a Chromebook. Especially when I have a regular Windows laptop that hands down beats everything a CB can do.

    I might be a bit anti-cloud, as lately Google has sent out more GApps service interruption emails than I care to count. Users were freaking out they couldn't do their work, meanwhile, I keep my stuff off the cloud, and never had an interruption in my work day, beyond comforting those who suddenly couldn't do any work. Oh the humanity...
     
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  3. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    That's the other thing. I'm already bent over a barrel, having to fork out copious sums of cash for a new phone, every 2-3 years since the blasted battery can't be easily replaced. I'm not going to jump on a $400 device that will have its OS run out in 4ish years. I've got a Lenovo T61 laptop, released in 2007/2008. Running W10. Came with XP. 10 years, still running. Not the fastest by any stretch, but at least I have the option to keep using it. And that T61 at 10 years old, can still do more than a CB. Forced obsolescence drives me nuts. *sigh*
     
  4. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    I know that they have said 4 years - but my Chromebook still gets updates and I haven't had to pay anything for it and it still runs as fast as day one.

    My Toshiba Laptop is still running Vista OS. I would have paid to put newer versions of OS on - but even with Vista, it is not as fast as my Chromebook. I probably paid about $600 for it 8-9 years ago - but it's OS has basically been forced obsolescence too.

    I guess eventually our Chromebooks will not get the updates - but we'll still be able to use them - and since it is a Chromebook - I'm not worried about security - at least not yet.

    As far as forking out $ every few years on our phones - it is why I have a LG G4 and a v10 - removable batteries. I'm hoping for $200 price range (give or take) for my next tablet/flip purchase - again, I want yesterday wows and today's low prices.

    Sent from my Lenovo TAB 2 A10-70F using Tapatalk
     
  5. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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  6. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    You've made good points, hc, but I could be tempted to spend $400. Maybe.

    My Chromebook has been a wonderful experiment so far. It was relatively inexpensive and I love how thin and light it is. Functionally, it nicely fills the gap between my smartphone and Windows desktop PC. I also appreciate how easy and (relatively) fast it is. I'm not a "power" Chromebook/Google user by any stretch, and the lack of ChromeOS apps and Android apps doesn't really bother me.

    Would I spend $400 at this point? Okay, not today. :)
     
  7. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    The topic of ChromeOS vulnerabilities came up in a department meeting just a few weeks ago. Wish I kept the sourced links. The worst part about these devices is the fact people treat them as appliances, just as you indicated. All complicit to the fact that these things are no more secure than your average computer, and using them post support is... a very bad idea. I can walk up to your locked CB, power it on, insert a USB drive with a nice little payload on it, and instantly have root control over your device. Your passwords, your online life. CBs don't have any sort of AV. You'll never know. That was just one of the many vulnerabilities that is yet unpatched Post support... you get the picture...

    With one hop from Vista, to 7, your laptop could be running W10. It requires work, and $, and as you said it is slow. But, it does solve the issue of obsolescence. W10 is supposed to be the last major OS upgrade. We will see about that... ;)

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Note 8 using Tapatalk
     
  8. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    HC - my wife's Acer laptop is a year or two newer than my laptop. We did put Windows 10 on it and it is SO slow that it has become obsolete and is not being used. When my son got his Asus T100TA-C1-GR Transformer in May of 2014 for high school graduation we liked it so well that we decided to get Mrs scjjtt a refurbished one in March of 2015 for $229. She basically doesn't use it, since the school district has provided her a Lenovo Windows laptop that can also run as a tablet. She doesn't separate the screen from the keyboard of her school laptop, but she does like using the touchscreen ability.

    I guess, I would rather invest around $200 into something that works as opposed to pouring money into something that runs so slow it can't really be used. As far as security - I'll keep it away from your thumb drive but isn't it true that, as of right now, it can't get viruses? Is there something else that I need to be concerned about using a Chromebook or an Android Tablet? I never use Public Wifi for my Chromebook or Tablet or phone. If I'm in public and I need to us, I'll tether them to my phone - which I have a password and only my specific devices can connect PLUS I have it set up that only 1 device can connect at a time - which would be my Tablet or CB. Besides common sense in using the World Wide Web - is there something else that I'm missing with security - besides keeping it away from thumb drives?



    Sent from my Lenovo TAB 2 A10-70F using Tapatalk
     
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  9. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    MAC OS High Sierra has a security flaw that allows root access without a thumb drive or password. Windows computers can suffer all kinds of attacks and exploits. Chromebooks are far more secure in my opinion, but you do have to be careful. While you can't technically get a virus (there are no executables), malicious attacks can happen through the browser and extensions. Continue doing the smart things you're doing, use unique and complex passwords, protect the physical device, and you'll reduce your risk. And don't text while driving.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
     
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  10. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    I hear you. W10 can take a system that runs, and turn it into a system that isn't worth it. I see that day in and day out. Anything with a benchmark of 1000 or less, really should not be running W10. I'm still sticking W10 on systems with a becnmark of 300. Yes... that low. Specialized tasks for the most part, and not really useful for direct user interaction. I don't disagree. W10 is not the solution for every system. Some just are not worth it.

    As for the safety and security of Chrome itself. Meh. There are so many addons for Chrome, for Google Drive, for Google Docs, that are not legit. Do you know for a fact they aren't siphoning off your data to some 3rd party? Regular Google accounts can't blacklist / whitelist addons. GSuite for Business/Education/Govt can, pending the admin actually does it. The massive security breach a few months back where people were being flooded by a fake google doc being shared with them, is just the tip of the iceberg. Yes, Google implemented some roadblocks so that exact scenario won't happen again, but they have done nothing to mitigate all the bad actors that put absolute crap out for their users to unknowingly install into their Google Apps. It is far easier to establish a whitelist, but that takes time to verify every app. You'll see that most Gsuite managed environments don't have any restrictions of this sort. You can guarantee their data has been compromised by a 3rd party.

    My boss hounds me for not using our Google apps more. I flagged him for a wide open policy on Google Drive apps. He had no idea. The amount of footwork required to secure Google Drive apps is staggering to him. It's on his to-do list, but he isn't giving it priority. Meanwhile, our data is being viewed by who knows what rogue drive apps, and doing who knows what to it.

    So, no, you're not vulnerable to the normal 'virus' that impacts the Windows world, but you're just as vulnerable to the malevolent nature of app developers, as well as still vulnerable to Chrome browser exploits which grant elevated access to the underlying OS. The worst thing about this IMO, is this is essentially an OS over your own OS. Now you've got an infection of your data, that transverses your native OS. You're infected regardless of what system you're on.

    No OS is perfect. I don't love Windows. I like it better than the other options, but believe me, I hate many things about it.
     
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