What gadget do you miss?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Adama D. Brown, Jan 29, 2010.

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  1. NamelessPlayer

    NamelessPlayer Mobile Deity

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    I can't think of anything I really, REALLY miss hardware-wise...

    ...okay, maybe I should have kept that CH Products Fighterstick USB for those flight sims of mine that center around prop jobs and not F-16s. I needed the cash badly at the time, and while I do have a potential non-force-sensing stick already for those type of flight sims, I still haven't modified the gimbals yet for better X/Y-axis response since I don't know where to get the needed linkages.

    There's also the HP TC1100 and its docking station-would have made a lighter, more compact document reader or extra monitor if I had it. Wouldn't really miss it if I had the Microsoft Courier concept to complement my new Gateway machine, though.
     
  2. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    I miss this:

    [​IMG]

    Stolen some forgotten day more than 15 years ago. My second engineering calculator. A gift from my dad, given to me some 17 years ago.

    I also miss this:
    [​IMG]

    Stolen some forgotten day some six years ago. Saved for it ten years ago, and a friend of mine that went on a trip to Tijuana jumped the border into San Diego and purchased it.

    I now use Power48 in my 680, but so much for an app. Sometimes there's nothing as a dedicated device. Oh, did I make those girls dance. I followed the gurus of the HP 48 platform, like Jean-Yves Avenard and Cyrille DeBrebison. Now that was a powerful mobile platform in its time.

    Sometimes I also miss several of my pocket tools, lost in assorted manners along the line. Swiss knives, folding knives, and an early SOG Tool.
     
  3. NamelessPlayer

    NamelessPlayer Mobile Deity

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    Aw, crap, now you're reminding me of the TI-84+ Silver Edition I used to have back in high school...but some taffer filched it while I wasn't looking.

    The most insulting part was that someone offered to sell me an identical calculator...and then I looked through the software to find that IT WAS MINE! But I couldn't PROVE that it was mine, so I handed it back and told him to take good care of my calculator, knowing full well that keeping it could make it seem more like I was the thief.
     
  4. Magellan

    Magellan Moderator of Ill repute Super Moderator

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    I miss my old Psion 3C. It was the first real gadget I had, and you could program on it.
     
  5. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    T'seems longish fingernails exist worldwide. Mine were stolen, 1. from my own car, and 2. from my briefcase. So much for human values.

    The TI-84 is a helluva calculator. Never owned one, though. I attended a university in which the general opinion was that the HP calculators were the best of the best. Then moved to another university where the general opinion was that the TI calculators were the best of the best. That pointless debate persists to the day. I prefer(red) the HPs cause they were more familiar to me. But I wouldn't speak bad of the TIs.
     
  6. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    I would say I miss my Vx, but she's goin' strong and I STILL like to use it. In fact, sometimes it's worth using the Graffiti on the Vx and beaming the bloody doc to my LifeDrive because the Vx is so much better. I still remember how that Vx seemed as revolutionary as the iPhone later would. I can also remember the first time I whipped out the Vx, folding keyboard and took minutes of an alumni meeting for 2 hours or so. People were amazed at how capable it was. It truly WAS a laptop replacement when laptops were HUGE and HEAVY!

    I also miss my Mac SE/30. A great, compact little computer that was pretty powerful for those days. She travelled to London and back with me and served ably. She's tucked away safe in her original box in my parents' basement.
     
  7. JRakes

    JRakes NOT your Average Joe

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    Hey, Hal - Guess what I just put fresh batteries in the other day... (Actually, mine's a "G" rather than an "S.") I decided it was much more useful for some stuff at workie than the so-so HP42 app (Free42) I have on Touchie. When I first started using the "real thing" again earlier in the week, it was almost sensual... :p

    Sorry, but it was so ironic that you mentioned that now! I'll tell him you said, "Hola!" on Monday. :)
     
  8. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Hahaha! Hello, my friend! Yeah, I know what you mean. Sometimes a dedicated device is much better and easier than our converged gadgets. After my dad gave me the HP48SX as a present, some months later the G series were released. Anyway, I felt very well equipped with my SX. Seems strange that so many years later, they fill the computing gap so good where PDAs and computers are just too big or too small ;)
     
  9. NamelessPlayer

    NamelessPlayer Mobile Deity

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    I'm more the opposite, because I haven't even seen an HP graphing calculator in person. On the other hand, the high schools around here just LOVE their TI calcs-usually 83s/84s, though some students pack an 89 instead.

    However, upon researching the HP calculators, their most distinctive feature is apparently eschewing algebraic/infix notation (what TI uses and everyone is taught in school, apparently) for Reverse Polish Notation, or postfix notation.

    For those of you who aren't familiar with RPN, let me try to outline my understanding:

    For a simple problem like "1 + 2 = 3", instead of pressing "1, +, 2, =" like you'd expect, you press "1, enter, 2, enter, +". The enter key defines a given operand, and the keys for the basic math operations are applied to the last two operands in the stack, with the result consolidating their positions.

    It'll be a bit easier to understand if I use a more complex problem like (3+5)*2. Order of operations suggests that we do the 3 and the 5 first, but RPN/postfix notation doesn't work that way-you actually input the 2 first if the problem is to be solved properly. 2, enter, 3, enter, 5, enter. Then hit + to add the 3 and 5 at the end of the stack, which leaves 2 and 8. Finally, hit X to multiply 2 and 8 to get 16.

    Crazy, huh? I'm guessing that some people find RPN more natural to work with and thus prefer HP calculators for that reason.
     
  10. Mi An

    Mi An Hyperfocal

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    Not real people, mostly just engineers. ;)

    [​IMG]
     
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