What do most ex-TX'ers move on to?

Discussion in 'Palm' started by boczkowski, Jun 2, 2010.

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  1. MSL

    MSL Mobile Evangelist

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    OK. Verbose stream-of-consciousness follows. You have been cautioned!

    I'm pretty sure I'm not representative of most people, but it looks like I'm finally going to ditch my Palm TX for my Nokia E71. I've been carrying both for entirely too long. I'll explain what I like and dislike about the E71, but first a brief chronology: HP100LX->HP200LX->Treo 180 -> Tungsten E2 -> Palm TX -> Nokia E71. I first used a PIM called PC Tools on my desktop back in the 1980s. I managed to move those data to the HP100LX and on to each successive device, including my E71 – had that not been possible, the switch would have been a non-starter. So, the origins of my PIM data are over 20 years old.

    What do I like about the E71 as a stand-alone device?

    1) It's just one device. That really is nice.

    2) Great WiFi features, with reliable connection to my hidden WPA networks.

    3) VPN capability, but I had to purchase a PPTP client because the Nokia-based IPSec is too complicated for me to sort just now...in theory it can be argued into connecting to my IPSec VPN Router.

    4) Great phone

    5) VoIP features really work, over both 3G (European, for me) and WiFi.

    6) Skype runs natively on the E71.

    7) Built-in GPS with your choice of subscription or free Turn-by-Turn Navigation. The subscription-enabled older Maps software is, IMO, superior to the later free navigation version of Maps.

    8) Syncs (mostly) with Lotus Organizer and MS Outlook (I've not tried the latter).

    9) Add-on software options are actually pretty decent right now. Opera web browsers are available, so you've got a choice. Between the built-in browser and Opera, there are few website that can't be viewed/used. Some of the add-on software is freeware, but most isn’t. However, all but a few vendors offer full-featured but expiring trial versions.

    10) Seemingly good encryption capabilities for phone memory and SDHC cards. Other security features are well thought out.

    11) It takes (so far) as large of a microSDHC as you can purchase.

    12) Good music player, but I don't sync it with anything.

    13) Runs Slingplayer mobile nicely

    14) Mobipocket Reader runs on this platform so all of my Mobipocket books could be transferred w/o additional cost. With the PPTP VPN client, I can retrieve my daily newspaper from my home PC in Mobipocket format.

    15) It has a great battery life, and a replaceable battery.

    16) Camera is functional.

    17) QWERTY keyboard with good keys which allow for one-hand use.

    18) Interface layout is highly customizable.

    19) The phone was included as part of a relatively inexpensive 18 month service plan. The carrier unlocked the phone upon request, and I've been able to de-brand it and upgrade firmware w/o being restricted to the carrier-provided versions.

    20) So far, this phone has been far more reliable than the Nokia E60, E61 & E65 and as good as the very different N95.

    21) It works as a BT modem or tethers (more easily) via USB Cable to other devices, including my Palm TX and my netbook, running both Ubuntu & W7.

    22) I can actually beam most data between the E71 and my TX. This proved crucial as I was having trouble migrating my appointment from the TX to the E71 using sync software. But the IR beam took care of things elegantly.

    What do I dislike about the E71 as a stand-alone device?

    1) It's a Nokia SymbianOS device. Nokia so predictably abandons devices by releasing a new one that you're left with a warm receipt and yet a stale product. And, now that Nokia has announced a move away from SymbianOS for their high-end phones, one can't expect much in the way of future SymbianOS development, can one?

    2) It's a Nokia SymbianOS device. There are some very frustrating aspects about Nokia phones. I was used to one nice feature on my N95 (tabbed Contact Groups), only to find that this was missing from the E71 and similar, later models. I did just find a nice work-around, but I had to figure it out myself. The older version was BETTER.

    3) It's a Nokia SymbianOS device. Some applications are not available for this platform and never will be (e.g., ePocrates) and some which are available have substantially less functionality than on the PalmOS platform (e.g., WorldMate Pro).

    4) It’s a Nokia. Someone decided that those of use with nice ear buds didn’t really want to use them with our Nokias. So they came up with a 2.5mm headphone jack which is compatible with nothing you’d care to use. So you’re left trying to find a genuine Nokia adapter (good luck) or trying a third-party adapter which is usually terrible.

    5) It’s a Nokia. Someone (possibly the same person as in 4 above) decided that the perfectly adequate mini-USB cable used on the N95 and on many, many other devices, was too large, so a new cable was needed, one that, for me, is necessary only on my E71. To keep it ridiculous, this device does not use the USB port for charging, which means that you’ve always got to carry a separate charger, while other phones can charge from the USB port of a computer. The voltage, BTW, is the same.

    6) It’s a Nokia. The interface for some PIM features is much harder to navigate than on the Palm devices. But, to be fair, I’m finding a number of satisfactory work-arounds as things progress. I only this week decided to see if I could make the switch as success. More time will tell, but I’m encouraged.

    7) It’s a Nokia. Everyone thinks it’s a Blackberry, and no one thinks I’ve got something cool…

    8) It’s a European model, meaning that it will work only with European 3G frequencies. I knew that when I got it, so that’s no one’s fault, but I wish that a true “World Phone” would emerge which could handle all of the many permutations. A challenge, I admit, especially with T-Mobile USA’s dual-band transmit/receive gambit.

    9) It's not an E72. But, at least it's not an E71x from AT&T!

    10) It's not an Android. But, neither am I.

    Am I going to be able to do w/o my TX? We’ll see. I’ll miss it, but I won’t miss carrying two devices.
     
  2. Jim Hogg

    Jim Hogg Mobile Evangelist

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    Thanks a bunch, Hook. Your reply plus your Nexus One review have given me the info I wanted. It looks like you use your Nexus the same way I want to use mine. It will pay for itself within a year in lower usage costs. I'll be saving my pennies to pay the upfront price and save down the road.

    Jim
     
  3. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    Great stuff MSL. Someone posted last week asking about this kind of phone, and I recommended the E72, which is much like your E71; but DOES have a 3.5 jack and USB charging. Plus, it's an elegant looking device. I don't know if it is coming to the USA though.

    Loved your comment about, 'a warm receipt and a stale product.' Great writing.
     
  4. MSL

    MSL Mobile Evangelist

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    Thanks, Varjak. But expect no worship from me. I'm pre-committed! But you appeal to my vanity as a wordsmith.

    If writing that post today, I'd have to say more about the idiotic 2.5mm headphone socket. I just received what might or might not be a genuine Nokia 2.5->3.5mm adapter (it has four contacts, so it's genuinely trying, at least). But, once again: No Cigar! To get dual-channel sound I have to position the headphone plug in a ridiculously unstable position (barely inserted, and ready to fall out if bumped). Full insertion yields only left channel.

    What in the world are those folks in Helsinki THINKING? Who knows? But I'm stuck with a great phone with bizarre interface issues, in both hardware and software.

    But, yes, I'm determined to complete my migration from my TX to my E71 as a statement of my own capability. And idiocy, perhaps.

    As proof, I cleaned up my ToDo list today. Next I migrate my PassWords Plus data to some SymbianOS equivalent. Nearly there. Just watch me.

    Wishing I had an E72...
     
  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    with respect to :
    the later Palm OS phones (e.g., Centro or 755p) used a similar type stereo ear buds with microphone, 4-conductor 2.5mm jack; Radio Shack sells a converter for around $5 that'll do the job. you even have a choice of 3 or 4 conductors for your 2.5mm side of the conversion. I use the 3 conductor version for my earbuds, and to play in the van.
     
  6. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    I remember when the 2.5mm jack was as hotly debated as Android v. iPhone is now. It's hard to imagine that there are still recent phones that have 2.5's. I mean, how complicating can the packaging issues be?

    Of course, I remember that the first iPhone had some kind of ridiculous recessed headphone jack.
     
  7. MSL

    MSL Mobile Evangelist

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    So...maybe I need the three contact version rather than the four contact one I just got? I imagined having tried one w three contacts when I first got the E71, but can't recall now. Thanks.
     
  8. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    I use Graffiti on my Centro by using Graffiti Anywhere:)
     
  9. sidetracked

    sidetracked Mobile Consultant

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    I am glad this thread was started, and would like to humbly request input and advice for my replacement situation. I do not need a phone, as I don't have cell service in the hills where I live and use a cheap prepay when I leave the holler.
    I am sad to see the TX go as it did what I needed, with some add-ons (a mic, and a bluetooth gps reciever) and several third party apps and tweaking.
    I really liked how it synced with my desktop, and I have years worth of memos categorized, as well as crops and plants in the database of the "contacts"
    I was extra happy with the drawing capability with a third party app for design and prototypes and even a pretty nice little cad app.
    But now my very well used TX has developed digitizer problems, needs a new battery, I lost my third party microphone in the woods somewhere, and my bluetooth gps receiver is starting to act squirrely so I think it is time to move on.
    Here is my wish list, if someone could give me some gadgets to look into, I would be most grateful. As I said, it won't be used as a phone. Additionally, I don't care if it is an older model or used something and I would prefer it not be "apple" or "I" anything. I had thought about a net book, but it is just too big to tote around with my other field equipment.
    I know my wish list is dreaming, but I tried to order my desires in terms of priority.

    -Sync with desktop
    -voice recorder
    -gps capability without subscription (third party apps and hacks are fine with me)
    -note taking and drawing capability
    -mp3 player
    -camera (for reference work only)
    -the usual utilities like calendar, stop watch, timer, etc.
    -wifi
    -I would so love it if it could do pandora (or at least sling pandora or other internet radio~ I had the tx set up to do this)
    -if not that, then fm radio (a few phones do this, I am told, but I have no idea which ones)

    Thank you in advance if anyone has any input on a gadget that might do these things for me.
     
  10. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    while I can't quote you a price to repair the TX, it can certainly be done, either by yourself (for the digi and battery) or by someone who does it for you. in this link you'll find Chris Short; he's in the US (as I assume you are..). a long time repair person, Shawn Lux, is no longer repairing PDAs. I've replaced the digi on my TX, and am thinking about doing the battery myself. as for other Palm OS units, iirc, the T3 has a built-in mic, but no wifi. I believe the only other Palm OS unit with wifi is the Lifedrive; not sure if it has a built-in mic. also not sure what the T5 has, as far as the mic.

    good luck; if you're really looking for a PDA-type handheld, the iPod Touch really isn't a bad choice, from what I've read. it does not, however, have PIMS like the Palm OS. the closest to those (PIMs) would be something running Windows Mobile, such as the HP iPAQ210 (or one of its different flavors, 211, 212). also, a number of folks here have purchased but not activated a smartphone, to use primarily as a PDA. that adds to the list of possible replacements.

    EDIT: at usdepdaparts.com, the glass digitizer is back in stock, for $29. 09JUL2010, for future reference.....
     
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