What can I do with my Palm T/X?

Discussion in 'General Palm OS' started by Russo, Mar 30, 2016.

  1. Russo

    Russo Newbie

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    I was just gifted with an unused Palm T/X, is it useable in any way? I understand the Palm OS is no longer supported by HP. Does this mean it is totally useless?
     
  2. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Welcome to Brighthand, Russo

    far, far from useless -- the Palm world still does some things better than anything Android or iOS has to offer, especially in the way of PIMs -- Personal Information Management software. the thing is, what do you want to do with it?
     
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  3. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    Agree with Rick... there are many things you can do with a PalmTX. There are some very good games (and all of them free of ads or in-app purchases!), there are programs for calculators, remote controllers, music, and even video. I used to watch a lot of movies on my TX some years ago. Of course, modern devices have much better video quality and performance, but it's still a very enjoyable experience IMO. My TX is still fully functional and I still use it every now and then.
     
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  4. SGosnell

    SGosnell (retired) Palm Pilot

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    There are things you can do with a Palm device, but there are none that can't be done better and more easily with a modern smartphone. It's fine to be nostalgic, but the truth is that the good old days weren't really all that good.
     
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  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    OUCH! Way to throw salt on our wounds, Stan! ;) I have to agree, though. I really enjoyed my Palm TX back in the day, but in today's world, it serves no practical purpose. I personally have not used Palm's PIMs in a way that would convince me of their superiority over anything I have on Android, but I suppose I'm not a power user. But I do remember how many hours were spent searching for solutions to basic issues like configuring a home screen, navigating and moving data between apps, and resolving freezes and slowdowns. There's a reason these forums used to be so popular. Today, smartphones work very well and for the general public, don't require the level of effort to accomplish simple things like reading the book or the news, getting emails, etc. If someone gave me an unused tech device from some 10 years back, I'd probably toy with it for a bit, but it would eventually end up going to recycling.
     
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  6. Hook

    Hook Phone Killer ;-) Arrrrr...f

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    You had me right up to the word "recycling." :vbeek: No no no, I won't empty the drawer of old toys (including my Samsung Player 5). :vbgrin:

    In many respects I agree with you, but to be fair, the very things you complain about above were the things PDAs were never really intended to do. Internet, email, media. We pushed them to do them anyway, but it never went all that well. What they were designed for and probably still do better than any smartphone is collecting list data, creating data bases with that list data and allowing easy manipulation of that data. Essentially you had a planner, notebook and list maker in your pocket with a highly optimized input system and a fairly reliable backup system (sync). However the technology was invented before we anticipated being so mobile and being connected everywhere. And the number of people who really care about having a database in their pocket is a very niche market. Smartphones, with the help of third party software, do this well enough for most people while providing the more commercially viable technologies for internet and media. For example, there is still no Bonsai or even Splashnotes class outliner for Android with desktop sync, but I don't imagine most of the market cares.

    So, no, I would never go back to my TX full time. It has only marginal support, that syncing stuff gets harder and I'm not going to carry two devices. However, it isn't just empty nostalgia when I pull it out and still admire what it does so well.

    Finally, in terms of this thread, the OPs question was never about whether he should use a TX or a smartphone. It was that he had been given a TX and he wanted to know if it was useless. Depending on what he wants to use it for, the level of effort he wants to make and the way he would like to use it, it most certainly is not.
     
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  7. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    I don't mean to be argumentative, but I think I am being fair. The Palm TX was intended to do internet, email and media (I can show you the ads ;). It had WiFi, a browser and email client, and even came with Kinoma for videos. We pushed hard to make those features adequate, but moved on when better technology came along.

    When was the PDA intended to be a database? I don't recall that as an advertised feature, and outside of handyshopper, what other database was there? Maybe you're referring to specialized apps for managing money, recipes, contacts, etc. If so, I think what's found on Android or iPhone is superior. I never used Bonsai or Splashnotes, but from what I can see, OneNote, Evernote or one of the myriad task apps should fill that gap.

    You're right about what the op wrote, but is that what he was asking? He hasn't returned, so I'm not sure. Without more context, I feel comfortable telling anyone outside of our unique group that the Palm TX is useless. In order to get a little use out of it would require an inordinate investment of time and effort. Don't misunderstand: I can support that kind of time suck. But I can't name it 'useable.'

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
     
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  8. Tom LaPrise

    Tom LaPrise Absent-Minded Professor

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    I don't recall the TX having WiFi... as far as I know only the Tungsten C had that. Something about the processor or software being unable to handle both Bluetooth and WiFi. Of course, it could use the WiFi SD card.

    EDIT: I'm wrong--the TX had WiFi. How 'bout that... I must be thinking about the Treos, which couldn't do cell radio, Bluetooth, and WiFi.
     
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  9. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    The Lifedrive had built-in wifi, too :vbwink:
     
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  10. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    I had forgotten that the Treos didn't have WiFi. Heck, I even misremembered the TE2 as having WiFi. :eek:

    I do miss the sense of accomplishment of overcoming some of the challenges we had back then, like getting IMAP email working, optimizing encoding for videos we recorded from various sources (e.g., TV tuner cards on our computers or ripping DVDs), capturing news feeds through AvantGo or Plucker. And what about using the TX for phone VoIP calls and accessing our home computers through PalmVNC? Ah....those were the days. Hmmm....and I'll never get that time back, either. :rolleyes: :D

    Welcome to Brighthand, Russo! Please come back and join the conversation!
     
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