The Tech Obituary

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hal, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. r0k

    r0k Dazed

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    iCloud syncs all my contacts, calendar and memos across my Mac, iPad and iPhone 5. Any change I make on any device appears within seconds on all the others. On those rare occasions I log in to iCloud on the web, my changes are visible there as well. Then there is the whole photostream experience. All my photos are on all my devices within seconds. When I'm at an event, I can create a shared public photostream on the fly and email the link to friends who can see the photos I'm shooting within seconds of my decision to share them. Then there's the whole seamless migration from device to device. I remember how seamless it was going from one Palm device to the next... until NVFS came along and I found myself in posession of a device that would auto-hard-reset itself. No problem with my iThings. My iPhone 5 had the same personality as my iPhone 4 within about 45 minutes of logging in. Automatic redownloading several gig of apps takes time. The same was true of my iPad mini. It had the same personality as my iPad 1 within about an hour, once again allowing for automatic app redownload. PIM data migration was almost instantaneous. Lastly there are preferences that I've gotten used to having to set up over again on new devices. Things like wifi settings. It turns out my iPad mini knows all the wifi passwords my iPad 1 knew. Talk about time savings! To describe what iCloud means to me in a short phrase, I'd say it's what wifi sync was for my TX but it's a lot more powerful. And yes there is a wifi iTunes sync option for those who refuse to participate in iCloud. I really dislike iTunes so I ignore the possibility of using it... even though an iTunes restore is the only way I know to carrier unlock an iPhone. I'd rather not bother. I hope they figure out a way to do carrier unlock using iCloud, otherwise when I sell off my iThings they will still be locked to At&t.

    I have friends who use google apps with their android devices. Don't get me wrong. I have a google apps account, but I'm not willing to let my personal data spill onto my work-issued Android phone so I can't directly tinker with Android sync capabilities. But I've heard they are very similar to Android with calendar, contacts and memos synced across devices.

    I use Mac computers so my contacts live in "Address.app", my calendar lives in "iCal.app" and my notes live (somewhat awkwardly) in "Mail.app". So if you're looking for a single app to rule them all, the closest thing is google apps through any browser. The distinction between a native app and a browser app is starting to disappear now that html5 allows browser apps to look and behave similar to their native equivalents.

    I do own Pocket Informant to allow me to make my iThings look more like my Palm things once looked but I haven't even launched the software more than once or twice in over a year now. I'm now used to the way things look in iOS.

    I miss those guys as well. :(. It was my unstable TX that made me become an expert in all things backup, including nvbackup, backupman and a half dozen others. The ability to quickly restore from SD card saved my data more than once.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2013
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  2. Hook

    Hook Caught Watching Prawn

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    Yes and no. Calendar and contacts work pretty well, except the Calendar is not as full featured as I like and doesn't d true categories. There really is no Google notes except Google Docs and they don't rally sync-- you just kind of do everything in the web browser. I don't object to Google apps because I don't want my stuff in the cloud (I'm not in love with that, but not because I worry that much about security), but because they are kind of hodge podge and Google often loses interest and changes stuff around. Companion Link actually has a nice solution of syncing everything in Outlook to an Encrypted server and then sending the data OTA to your devices. I haven't used it extensively because I am waiting for my Nexus 4 and jelly Bean, but i was impressed when i tried it out. It doesn't give you web acces to the data, but that just adds to the security. Pocket Informant also is trying to build their own cloud, but so far only do events and tasks.

    To me the Cloud is fine as along as it is my pass-through back-up and not the only place I keep stuff. I love Dropbox and couldn't live without it.
     
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  3. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    r0k's description of the effectiveness of the iCloud is hard to beat. And it can be a proof of concept that the legacy ability to hotsync has been surpassed. However, I still have my objections regarding the iCloud mechanics. Such as the high-walled approach that such functionality demands. But OK, in the end life is a series of tradeoffs.

    This, and only this, makes me question the Google people's sanity. I mean, their core services are generally stable and up to the state-of-the-art. If the Calendar only had Categories... I mean, is it really asking that much?

    There used to be the Google Notebook until somebody figured you do the same thing when you doodle a phone number on a sticky next to your home phone line, and when you spend the evening at your desk finishing a monthly report for your boss. Yeah, right, you use the same tools. So they merged everything in Google Docs. That's why I liked Google Notebook. Ah, and BTW there's this Google add-on for Outlook that allows you to sync the Outlook Contacts and Notes to Google. The Outlook Notes sync to Google Docs. I installed it in one of my dad's computers and it works fairly good.
     
  4. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Aportis

    I ran into this one earlier in the evening, and it turns out that Aportis had shut operations kind of a decade ago. And I'm just finding out. In my early Palm days, I used Aportis Doc, as a side option to the Palm Reader which was my main mobile documents reader. I used an economy Palm model, so I had to save as much internal memory as I could. Even though Aportis Technologies had long since faded away, their reader is still available here and there all over the Net. And FWIW, the contemporary office productivity suites, such as Microsoft Office, OpenOffice.org, and LibreOffice, they all include plugins to interpret the AportisDoc file format.

    A very belated farewell, Aportis.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2013
  5. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    3Com

    Belated tombstone in place.

    All the whole Palm happening took place during the historical lapse when personal computing was already a reality but full-size computers still had to disseminate to the current condition, where you can find a PC or similar waiting for you at a new job, or at school, or yes at home. The Palm OS devices arrived at more or less the time when desktop computers were becoming appliances.

    And much of it happened when 3Com, for all things a modems manufacturer, merged with US Robotics, the latter being the then-owner of the Palm brand, and also a modems manufacturer. If you ask me, I'd say that perhaps this early modem affinity was what allowed the Palm saga to be so well equipped for desktop connectivity. And the HotSync feature was born. In the current times, when most mobile platforms still don't come along with a dependable transference system (I said most, not all, before flak starts flying), well these mobile platforms, however current and evolved, are more than a decade late in transfer technology. When the Palm devices were incepted, HotSync was a part of the whole thing. It wasn't an accessory, nor an optional 3d party thing. And in much of it, a dependable landing of data from mobile to desktop was a notable part of this platform's success.

    3Com took much of curbing and swerving throughout the years. It expanded, it merged, it did takeovers, it shrunk. I reckon much of it at the general pace of the dot com era, and beyond. In 2010 it was sold to HP, in order to enforce one of the contemporary guidelines of that firm, the Converged Infrastructure Strategy. Odd enough, US Robotics outlives the corporation that once took it over.

    I raise my coffee mug, and toast for a brand of the recent past. Godspeed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2013
  6. JRakes

    JRakes NOT your Average Joe

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    Indeed, Hal! I miss Palm... <Toast>
     
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  7. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    LIKEWISE

    P.S. Some months ago I told our church's children's pastor that DailySteals were having Pre 2's on sale for $75 to replace her Pre Plus. She ordered - but pressed the order button twice. Before they arrived she upgrade her phone with Big Red with an Android. She's been using the phone (an entry level one at best) but got tired of it after 4-6 months &amp; converted to the Pre 2 on Sunday afternoon.

    I was holding out for a Pre 3 - but before I could get one with Verizon our family switched to Sprint.

    Sunday I got to hold the phone I had wanted (except the Pre 3 was a little bigger). It felt SO nice in the hand - plus I enjoy Web OS.

    Sunday, holding that phone just brought back all the painful memories.

    I don't drink - but maybe I need a few more glasses full for this toast!

    Sent from my Samsung Epic 4g using Tapatalk
     
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  8. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    InkMark Software

    After Xerox claimed a patent infringement regarding hand writing recognition, Palm had to phase the original Graffiti out. And ever since, things went FUBAR with this subject. The Graffiti 1 engine was incredibly simple and effective. Graffiti 2 had an additional layer provided by Jot, originally created by CIC Softare, and it is good in general, period. And a whole constellation of options came up in order to "write on a Palm".

    InkMark Software offered an impressive option called MobileWrite. It was less dependant on a rigid digital calligraphy format, and allowed personal handwriting to overpose the Graffiti digital calligraphy. I tried it years ago, and I was also impressed that it didn't eat that much memory. This resource was timely announced at Brighthand. Eventually, a version for Android was released.

    Currently, the website is site squatter's meat. Godspeed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2013
  9. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Aaron Swartz

    Under discussion in a thread of its own. Farewell, Aaron. Every RSS feeds user owes you something.
     
  10. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Canuck Software

    This developer was widely reknown for its Canadian pride. I remember downloading a couple of freebies years ago. This morning I noticed the original website is down, with an announcement and an automated jump to another site, that is also down.

    Godspeed.
     

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