The death of the Tablet?

Discussion in 'General Smartphone/Handheld/Wearable Discussion' started by LandSurveyor, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    I was browsing through Flipboard on my phone when I came across an article in an Indian publication wherein the tech pundit there thinks tablets are on the wane. He says his current device is about 3 years old now and succeeding devices have offered nothing new to make him consider upgrading. He also cites the rise of the phablet and lower cost laptops and convertibles as squeezing in on the tablet space.

    I can't really disagree. While I could easily go to a larger phone than my SIII, I am quite glad to have replaced my Touchpad with a Chromebook for most of my at-home browsing and I believe it would be a capable on-the-road device as well, what with both T-Mobile wireless data and wifi. Granted, the Touchpad was a dead-end, what with HP's fumbling but a lot of the frustrations I had with it, such as the onscreen keyboard, are common to all tablets.

    But that's just me (and at least one guy in India). I'm sure others find it perfect in their own scenario. I just wonder if, like so many other tech devices in the past, it may be allowed to die on the vine when the majority of consumer interest goes somewhere else.
     
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  2. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Tablets have been killing PCs for about two years now (traditional PC sales are in a freefall, and it corresponds directly with the growth of iPads and Android devices), and there were super-cheap netbooks long before the iPad took the world by storm, so I'm not expecting cheap laptops or desktops (of traditional form factors) to hurt tablets at all.

    I DO think phablets are a threat to dedicated tablets, as are convertible tablets. My next phone is going to be a phablet, and between that and my convertible tablet PC, I really have no use for a pure tablet of the iPad/Nexus variety. Why have three dedicated devices when two genre-bending devices cover he three usage scenarios just as effectively, with less total cost and less worries about syncing/sharing documents between devices?

    Here's a recent article about the iPad killing PC sales: 'My iPad has Netflix, Spotify, Twitter – everything': why tablets are killing PCs | Technology | The Guardian
     
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  3. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    Well I don't know if Tablets will become obsolete or not but I'm still enjoying and using my HP TouchPad - especially having it fixed to dual boot in Web OS or CM 9. I use it most for media consumption and use my Acer C7 and Toshiba laptop for work.

    When I travel and want to take only 1 item, besides my phone, it is my TouchPad with a Bluetooth keyboard.

    Today, if I didn't have what I have I definitely would get the Asus T100 Transformer. A tablet with an attachable keyboard and free Windows Office seems the best of all the options.

    By the way, I just purchased another 32g HP TouchPad for $130. The guy bought it from Costco, couldn't find very many apps so it was stored in his closet. The TouchPad is for my parents. They never use their computer any more. They say they wanted a spare - I think they both want one to use. This time I've dual booted it so they'll have the option to use Android.

    Again, IMO, the TouchPad is still a great value for a 10'' Tablet.



    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4
     
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  4. Drillbit

    Drillbit Mobile Deity

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    PCs are definitely hurting. The local K-Mart use to carry a few every Christmas but now its down to one model and a whole bunch of Android and Kindle tablets. A friend I know who works in the PC shop I browse often complains about the lack of sales recently. I told him the local economy is faltering, maybe I should have told him across the world, PC sales might already be less than half it was in 2010. Indeed, its likely tablet sales would have overtaken PC sales this quarter.

    I do think phablets are poised to disrupt tablets, although phablets themselves are still quite expensive assuming the Galaxy Note as a median. The sub $200 tablet might still be around, and over $200 like the Nexus 7 may still be a safe bet. A decent mid range phablet will still cost $300 to $400 like the Galaxy Mega.

    The killer feature of the phablet is that it combines both tablet and phone functions in the inbetween size. But the funny thing about it is that in Asia, where phablets are growing, tablets that feature mobile data capability have true phone capabilities, unlike their versions in the US (see the Galaxy Tab 7"). In the US, the same tablet will only work with a mobile data only SIM, and has no SMS and voice capability. But in Asia, these tablets work with phone SIMs, have callers and true SMS. They are literally giant phones. And just as it was Samsung who led the phablet race, its Samsung making a lot of these phone capable tablets, and everyone notably, Asus, is responding.
     
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  5. sofene

    sofene Mobile Deity

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    I have touchpad which is mostlly lying idle because of lack of apps to download. I would be interested in knowing how you created the dual boot to install android.
     
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  6. SGosnell

    SGosnell (retired) Palm Pilot

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    I still have my Asus Transformer Prime, but I use it less and less these days. I mostly use my chromebook, either running ChromeOS or Debian as I need, and that's mostly enough. I have a SolidRun CuBox-i running as my desktop, and I can run Android on it as well as Debian. There are some limitations with using an ARM CPU, but they're not really serious. The worst are that I can't run Dropbox or Teamviewer on it in Debian, but the're both available in Android. It's somewhat of a pain switching between the two operating systems on the CuBox-i, since it boots from a microSD and I have to change the card to reboot into the other OS, but it's not the end of the world. On my chromebook I just switch between browser tabs, and use a keyboard shortcut to switch, a matter of seconds. If I had an Acer C720P with touchscreen, I would be somewhat happier, but the touchscreen is only a convenience, not a necessity. I've never been that enthusiastic about a pure tablet. I need a keyboard, must have a keyboard. No keyboard, no sale to me. That won't likely change.
     
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  7. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    Sofene,

    I have dual booted 4 TouchPads even though I always get help in rooting and putting a different ROM on my phones. Here are the steps that I use to put CM 9 on. I use CM 9 because it is stable and I know everything works - wifi & Bluetooth. The only thing that I miss with CM 10 is the ability to close out all background running programs with one click - in CM 9 I have to swipe them off the screen to disable them one by one. Not a big deal for something that runs without any problems.

    If you haven't already done this - you need to go to the following site and maximize your TouchPad for Web OS. The author for installing CM 9 assumes you have already done this. Doing so makes your Web OS experience better PLUS it sets the unit up for the instructions for CM 9 installation.

    New Touchpad? Here's your "Get Started" guide - webOS Nation Forums

    I did all the essential things that "ncinerate"suggests to do. If you have any questions on anything - feel free to ask here or send me a PM.

    After you have your TouchPad in top shape - take a day off and then go to...

    CM9 on the Touchpad? Here's your "Get Started" guide! - webOS Nation Forums

    ... and again follow "ncinerate" instructions.

    When I went to install my 3rd TouchPad with CM 9 I found some of the links that "ncinerate" had in the instructions no longer were valid - therefore unable to download the files needed to dual boot. Fortunately I had saved all the files and used them. I have offered on that last link above to send anyone the necessary files that they'll need to install CM 9. Just PM and let me know of an email address to send them to.

    When I purchased my 4th TouchPad for my parents the seller had already put a different ROM on it. It was Evervolv. The Bluetooth didn't work on it. Although it seem like a great ROM I was watching another YouTube video about it tonight and still there are some things that don't work. Here's the site:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6jXF1oVLlM

    With CM 9 - everything works and I have a great Android Tablet.

    Remember, I'm not savy I have friends who set my phones up - but when it comes to TouchPads - I just slowly follow the directions and I've been able to dual boot 4 TouchPads.

    Good luck and let me know if I can help in any way.
     
  8. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    I'm pretty much the same. These days my Touchpad is gathering dust. Now I mostly use my HP14 Chromebook.
     
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  9. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    There are a couple of things going on here.

    I suspect affluent Asians are just farther along in a trend than Americans -- if one almost never makes phone calls, there's little reason to have a small phone. Larger screens make everything else better.

    Those Asians with more modest incomes can only afford one computer, and in increasing numbers are choosing a phablet or small tablet as the most flexible solution. For their money they get a device that's both their PC and their phone. If I could only afford one single device, that's what I'd do, too.
     
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  10. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    There's no room for doubt that tablets are cutting into sales of desktops and laptops. And I see room for a range of designs in tablets.

    The "pure" tablet appeals most to consumers looking for a device for personal use. This is the best configuration for video, ebooks, games, and just generally sitting in front of the TV accessing web sites, social networks, etc.

    Business people want and need a keyboard for word processing, email, spreadsheets, etc. but one these can easily be added to a tablet. This is a superior option to a laptop because it's more flexible -- the keyboard can be removed whenever it's not needed, and a work device becomes a personal one.

    Asus, HP, and others are making tablets that are bundled with keyboards, but my gut sense is that the iPad is still the most popular choice for this, thanks to the plethora of companies that make add-in keyboards (Logitech, ZAGG, etc.).

    Personally, I'm ready for Apple to realize how many people get an external keyboard for their iPad and use it as a two-in-one. (I'm doing so right now.) Apple has not given the business potential for its tablet enough attention, and as a result has not only left money on the table, it has left openings for its competitors.
     

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