Security News This Week: Hackers Are Erasing Western Digital Hard Drives Remotely

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by RickAgresta, Jun 26, 2021.

  1. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    The whole point of using a network-attached storage device is to have a hard drive where you can back up important data and then access the files over the internet while you're out and about. But unknown hackers are turning Western Digital My Book NAS hard drives into nightmare backup tools by compromising users' devices and then deleting all the data from them. The My Books are controlled by an app, WD My Book Live, which allows customers to access their data remotely and manage their NAS. But users worldwide are reporting that their devices have been hijacked and wiped. When they attempt to log in and gain access, the remote management dashboard says “Invalid password.” Western Digital told Bleeping Computer in a statement that it is actively investigating the situation. So far, though, victims who have lost data are simply out of luck. The devices in question are at least six years old and received their most recent firmware update in 2015. “Western Digital has determined that some My Book Live devices are being compromised by malicious software. In some cases, this compromise has led to a factory reset that appears to erase all data on the device," the company said. "At this time, we recommend you disconnect your My Book Live from the Internet to protect your data on the device."

    link:
    https://www.wired.com/story/western-digital-hard-drives-erased-amazon-wickr-security-news/

    Related article:
    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/ne...ces-are-being-remotely-wiped-clean-worldwide/
     
  2. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    IoT strikes again. The only mostly secure way to be online is to use devices that have a proven track record of constant security updates. What a mess. I feel for end users. #1 they haven't a clue that they are using a pathetically vulnerable device and #2 they lack the means and resources to know and do better in serving a file share online.

    Ish!

    Sent from my Samsung Note 20 Ultra using Tapatalk
     
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  3. Hook

    Hook Her Clack is Worse Than Her Bite

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    That's why I leave most of my online storage to my friend's Linux server (he does linux servers for a living) which I only access through SSH, SFTP and secure rsync. I don't know what I'm doing, but thankfully he does.

    I do use Dropbox, knowing they can be compromised, but everything is well backed up.

    I'm very lucky to have a friend who is such a good and knowledgeable resource.
     
  4. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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  5. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    This is terrible. I really feel for those users who trusted their NAS only to find them unexpectedly formatted.

    I considered WD products back when I decided to get a NAS. The only reason I didn't get any was that they were much more expensive than most other brands. I never thought about checking how often they were receiving security updates. I never check that, to this day, when buying any product. My Netgear ReadyNAS (purchased in 2017) still gets frequent firmware updates, with the last one about 1 or 2 months ago. I really should do some research, see if there's any known issue with this brand/model. I should also see how to make it more secure. I guess I should toss it out the window and replace it with a newer model once it stops receiving updates. I do have another backup of critical data, in the form of a portable hard disk that I only plug to update the backup, then store it back in a drawer.

    I also use OneDrive, but keep local backups of everything.

    What a mess indeed. I keep thinking I could have been one of those users if I hadn't minded paying top dollar for a WD NAS. I used to like that brand very much.
     
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  6. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    The individuals responsible for making the hard drives aren't the same individuals that are responsible for making craptastic IoT devices that are security vulnerabilities. They're under the same WD name, but worlds apart. I like their drives, but these SOHO devices aren't worth the trouble.

    I know it's anecdotal, but the forums for Plex - people running their servers or their media storage on these SOHO devices are the ones with the biggest issues, full stop. My skill-set puts me at a different level than many of the people on there, so it's not an apples to apples comparison, but at a certain point, the hardware you use does come into play with better reliability and fewer issues all around.
     
  7. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    Part of the allure of their SOHO drives is that WD markets them as very much worth the trouble: easy to setup, very easy to use, small footprint, etc. I know because of the -flawed and incomplete, as I just realized- research I did a few years ago when deciding on a NAS. My cousin has a WD My Book model, can't remember the model or manufacture year, but it's about 10 years old. I'm sure it hasn't been updated in the recent past years. It's such a compact, nice-looking device that back then I only wanted to get one, with at least double the capacity of the one my cousin has.

    I used to like WD drives, and tried to buy them whenever possible. For a long time I planned to replace my NAS drives (all four of them) with WD Red drives. Then I read about WD using shingle (SMR) drives instead of conventional (CMR) models for their Red line, which is supposed to be designed for NAS applications. I read a lot of horror stories about users switching to Red drives, only to discover that they were shingle models when their NAS bogged down once the Red drives were inserted. Now I'm looking at getting Seagate IronWolf models, if my wallet ever agrees, that is :D
     
  8. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    The WD Red drives are exactly what I am using. In my application, CMR vs SMR has virtually no impact. I am not using a NAS or a SAN, they are mounted inside my server as JBOD. They have done extremely well in this usage scenario and have afforded me the drive capacity I need, coupled with reliability and affordability. I don't have redundancy. Most of my data isn't crucial to keep. I can rebuild if needed. Any data that is critical to keep, I copy to a folder on every drive. 4 copies of that data, but one physical location. It could be better, but that is what I have for now.

    Sent from my Samsung Note 20 Ultra using Tapatalk
     
  9. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    I used to have my disks as JBOD. Back then my PC case held 5 or 6 HDDs. But it was too hard for me to keep track of where everything was stored, that's when I decided to turn everything to RAID. I eliminated some of the smaller (0.5TB and 1TB) disks, and consolidated everything into a 8TB, 4 disk array. Took me some time and a lot of HDD juggling to migrate everything, since first I had to copy stuff out of the four 2TB disks into whatever other disks I could find. Then I had to configure the NAS with the 4 disks, and then move everything back into the array. I remember that one of the 500GB disks I used to copy the stuff failed and I lost some data, mostly ripped movies with names starting from R to U. Star Trek (even-numbered movies and TNG) and Star Wars (original trilogy, plus the Jar Jar movies :D) were lost, together with U-571, Snatch, and a lot more. Luckily, back then I still had the original DVDs, so I had to rip them again. I can't repeat that feat, since I've given all of my discs (music and video) away, so all I've got is the files in the RAID. The really critical stuff (documents and my favorite movies) reside in the 4TB portable disk I mentioned above. The really really critical stuff is also stored in OneDrive, which does not backup to the NAS, but to my laptop's internal HDD and the portable 4TB disk.

    EDIT: Corrected the disk array size, it's 8TB, made up of four 2TB HDDs :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2021
  10. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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