Reviews of Android OS Apps

Discussion in 'Android OS' started by Ed Hardy, Sep 1, 2010.

  1. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    I noticed your recent review of this in the Chrome store wasn't very good, but I installed it anyway in the hopes it'll work for me with my non-Gmail account. So far so good, but as you point out here, tiny non-resizable window.
     
  2. SGosnell

    SGosnell (retired) Palm Pilot

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    Yeah, it worked for me for awhile, but I recently started having problems. The developers have been communicating with me, think they have found the problem, and plan to provide an updated version soon that fixes it. I'll probably update the review again when it happens.

    The problem I hit is that it often just freezes, and I have to use the task manager to kill it. It seems to be an issue with an sqlite DB. I haven't had the problem on my chromebox or Android phone, just on the one chromebook. I'm using Icedove (Debian rebranded Thunderbird) in a crouton Linux chroot on it in the meantime. If they can fix the freezes, and make the window resizable, CloudMagic will be an excellent solution. The devs didn't seem to know it was possible, but I told them about Sunrise calendar, which can be resized at will, along with other ports from Android, and I'm hoping they figure it out soon.

    BTW, if you're looking for a calendar, Sunrise is very good. It syncs with Google seamlessly, and I get all my family's calendars in it. I like it a lot better than the Google web access version, and it also gives me the same interface on Android and ChromeOS. On Chrome, you can easily resize the window to any size using the standard corner drag, or click the standard icon in the top right corner to toggle full-screen.
     
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  3. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    CloudMagic has an awesome (relatively new) feature: Save emails to Evernote, Wunderlist, Pocket, OneNote and more. During my job search, I want to track recruiter and client communications and notes. I want to use OneNote, but can't easily send emails from my stock email client to there (unless I use Outlook.com). CloudMagic overcomes this limitation very nicely.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2015
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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    jig, agree it's a nice feature; am I right in thinking you'll be doing the 'heavy lifting' on your Chromebook? and be using OneNote on your phone as needed?
     
  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    I'm not sure. While I love OneNote on my desktop, so far I find it frustrating on my Chromebook and smartphone. Maybe I just don't know what I'm doing, but I can't figure out how to (easily) move a page from one notebook to another. I love how OneNote on the desktop lets me organize things, and while mobile I can add notes and refer to them, it's just that I haven't figured how to do any 'heavy lifting' other than on the desktop.

    My Chromebook is great for consuming media and information, but I haven't been able to get any real work done on it. The Chromebook nicely fills the gap between my desktop PC and smartphone, but Microsoft Office on a PC is far superior to anything else. Google Docs, MS Office Online, etc., just don't compare in terms of functionality and usability. The advantages I'm finding for taking things mobile on the Chromebook and smartphone are limited to convenience and availability of my information.
     
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  6. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    Just to be clear, I'm running CloudMagic on both my smartphone and Chromebook. The capability of sending emails to OneNote seems equal on both platforms and I really love that I can do this.

    On my desktop, I send emails from my Outlook client to OneNote. It's awesome being able to do this while mobile using CloudMagic, but on my desktop using Outlook I have many more options for how to add emails to OneNote as well as preserving formatting. That's not always necessary or even desired, but probably where I'll do most of my work.
     
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  7. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    You might have to find a new calendar app, Stan. ;)
    Microsoft reportedly buys social calendar app Sunrise
     
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  8. SGosnell

    SGosnell (retired) Palm Pilot

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    Yeah, I just saw that. I'll start looking...

    When I opened Sunrise today, there was an announcement that MS has bought Sunrise. It seems official. I really hate to see this, as Sunrise is the only calendar for ChromeOS that works well. I guess I'll be back to the default Google calendar unless something else pops up.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2015
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  9. SGosnell

    SGosnell (retired) Palm Pilot

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    Who knew? I opened Google Calendar for the first time in a long time, and it's better, and better looking, than Sunrise. Lots of changes recently, obviously, so I'm using that now, and have uninstalled Sunrise on everything.
     
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  10. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    I'm now several hours into The Banner Saga and I have to endorse it as one of the best games on Google Play.

    Trailer:



    Basically, it's one part tactical RPG, one part choose-your-own adventure book.

    TACTICAL RPG: Battles are well-thought-out and surprisingly complex. There are a number of tactical considerations which actually translate to real-life combat so they don't ruin the atmosphere. With each attack, you have to choose between attacking armor or attacking strength (in real life, trying to shatter their shield or trying to hit them). Damaging armor makes subsequent attacks to strength do more damage. And then there's this whole point of "attacking strength"--your strength for attack purposes and your remaining hit points are one in the same; injuries weaken you in addition to bringing you closer to death. This makes so much logical sense you wonder why more games don't do this. And then there's a number of different classes, combat styles, special abilities, items that grant buffs, etc. It's a lot to keep track of at first but there's a rewarding sense of depth to it all, and it never feels artificial or complex for complexity's sake (the way some of the more esoteric combat-and-leveling systems of, say, Final Fantasy can be).

    Also, the game runs off auto-saves. None of this "save before the battle and try to do it perfectly, and if not, load and try again" stuff. It adds some real weight to the experience.

    CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE: Between battles, gameplay pans out in a series of branching dialogue trees or action trees. Something happens or someone says something, and you have 3-4 ways to respond (it puts text up and you choose one of the options). This works well for two reasons. First, your decisions really matter; it's not like in certain games that have the illusion of choice, but basically the same result occurs regardless (the ending of Mass Effect 3 being the classic example). Characters live and die, join you or fight you, based on your decisions. Entire villages of women and children can live or die based on your decisions, and there's sometimes no one "morally right" answer, and unintended consequences are common. Second, this works off auto-saves too. No "gosh, that didn't turn out as I expected, lemme try this again." Every decision has weight because you can't change your mind and try the other options to see what is best.

    ATMOSPHERE: The art style is hand-painted and fits great with the sad/stoic feel of the game overall. Characters are believable, morally complex, and have diverse personalities. I have two gripes. First, the music is good, but isn't playing the majority of the time; I'd like more of it. Second, the lore of the game is thick, and they kind of throw you in the middle of it without quite enough background explanation early on of who is who and what's going on. It's Old Norse-ish without being entirely based on Old Norse mythology, and some of the lore of the game had me confused for the first hour even though I have a bit of a background in Old Norse mythology, You catch up eventually, though, and after an hour or two you start to get really sucked in.

    PERFORMANCE: I get occasional stutters with a Moto X (2014), but nothing too serious. Load times for battle or changing location are a few seconds of black screen with a progress bar. Nothing in the game requires twitch reflexes, so these minor issues are only annoyances and don't affect gameplay. Some control elements are small on a 5.2" screen, but nothing unmanageably small (and this isn't a game where reflexes matter at all).

    PRICE: $4.99, and worth every penny. No in-app purchases or ads either.
     
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