PPC programming?

Discussion in 'Windows Phone' started by cratos, Jul 30, 2003.

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  1. cratos

    cratos Mobile Deity

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    Anyone done any development for the PPC? I did a little research on it and found a couple of things that look promising for making small apps.

    One was the eVB thing. But i couldnt find much information on how this works. is there something that youput on your PPC in order to run these eVB apps? or is it just compiled so that it will run on the PPC?
    The other was SUPERWABA. This seems very promising because you can compile a program and run it on palm and PPC as long as they both have the WABA vm.

    What does everyone else use for development?
     
  2. R0B

    R0B Mobile Enthusiast

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    Most programmers who program the apps and games for the pocketpc will use eVC++ 3.0 (or 4.0 for ppc 2003). This is a very nice (and free :D ) c/c++ compiler. If you have never programmed before, you could use eVB to start out with (since there is very little programming involved), but if you plan on developing the next killer app, you will probably want to try out eVC. Either way, all of the tools that you need can be found at www.pocketpc.com. Look under the downloads section (developers segment) for all of the tools you need. You will want to download embedded visual tools (which includes eVC and eVB) and the sdks for the oses you plan on programming for (i.e ppc2000, ppc2002, ppc2003, hpc2000 (to name a few)). Last I checked, embedded visual tools 3.0 included ppc2002 sdk in the package, but MS changes that every so often.

    If you want a good book to get you started, I would recomend "LeMothe:pocket PC Game Programming." While it is mainly focused on games, and has several flaws (It always kills me when an author says, "This code is unoptimized and you can optimize it yourself later") it has a very good walkthrough of basic windows programming (in c/c++), covers creating windows, graphics (which really arn't used for just games any more) and user input. All of which are important aspects of almost every program. Anyways good luck and have fun.
     
  3. cratos

    cratos Mobile Deity

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    No, I am a computer science major and I have almost 7 years of programming under my belt. I know that programming in c/c++ would make the app much more efficient but I was just wondering how the eVB thing worked. Does it run on a vm type thing or is it a compiled program? You never know eVB could be usefull someday for very quick and easy apps that dont need to be superfast. (I had in mind my own custom DogAteIt type app that I dont have to pay for. I'm a broke college student). I don't plan on writing any games anytime soon.

    It seems that the SuperWABA option is promising because then my brother could run the apps on his palm. =)
     
  4. iqat

    iqat Mobile Evangelist

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    i have just just started to play with programming ppc too. i am an IT exec with (what used to be) excellent programming skills.

    i understand your question. I do not believe that you need any VM or intepreter or runtime files for eVB apps. I think whatever might be needed is already installed on a basic PPC. If someone knows for sure please speak up.

    New question: anyone know how to copy flat files to arbitrary place on the PPC emulator? I've tried to connect to it using ActiveStink but no luck. I can look at files using platform manager but the file|Import function is disabled.

    thanks!
     
  5. imported_macpel

    imported_macpel Mobile Deity

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    EVB apps do require a runtime and are interpreted at runtime, that's what makes them slower than a c++ app.

    Now I don't recall which ppc have the VB runtime installed but I beleive 2003 don't. They have the .net runtime build in.

    Personally I would suggest to use C# to develop your apps if you can afford the development kit if not then C++. Now superwaba is nice but again requires a vm, if it's for yourself than it's ok but personally people won't want to install the vm and your app if you're looking for distribution. Also since it's java the ui is quite different from say a regular ppc app. Good luck...
     
  6. tsapiano

    tsapiano Mobile Evangelist

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    Depending on how poor you are, you could buy a copy of Visual Studio .NET 2003 Academic - at $100US it isn't cheap, however compared to the ~$1500 price of the Pro version (academic is idential in functionality to Pro, just you have to be a full-time student to get it) it ain't bad.

    Using .NET the visual tools work with either Visual Basic.NET or C# - and C# is a much better programming language if you have decent background in programming ;) .NET doesn't produce compiled code, but uses JIT compiling so it still isn't as fast as C++ - however the MSIL code is supposedly more compact and the framework has Java-like garbage collection routines.

    eVB uses a runtime that IIRC interprets the code as it runs - so it will be slower than the JIT approach used by .NET and a lot slower than compiled C++. Additionally, I believe that Microsoft is dropping support for eVB as WM2003 doesn't even contain the VB runtime - eVC++ is still supported as it still creates the fastest code, however eVB is being replaced by VB.NET in Microsofts scheme of things.
     
  7. cratos

    cratos Mobile Deity

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    Does Visual Studio .NET come with Pocket PC programming tools? How does that work, I mean you cant create an app the same way you do for windows right, system calls cant be the same, and what about screen size?
     
  8. cratos

    cratos Mobile Deity

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    Seems that microsoft is giving away eVB and eVC++. Check it out.
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...48-31EE-4CBE-AAC5-0AFFD5FB27DD&displaylang=en
    and the newer eVC++4.0 too
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...3D-50D1-41B2-A107-FA75AE960856&displaylang=en
     
  9. imported_macpel

    imported_macpel Mobile Deity

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    You can, your object calls are just limited to the compact framework compare to the full framework, but you can expand on it if you so desire (with new objects or .dlls). When you create a ppc project your screen size is fine.

    Here's some info:

    http://smartdevices.microsoftdev.com/

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/device/compactfx.aspx
     
  10. tsapiano

    tsapiano Mobile Evangelist

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    VS.NET 2003 added a bunch of tools specifically aimed at PocketPC development. The development environment has a drag and drop UI development system like VB that works in both C# and VB.NET languages. The .NET compact framework is a subset of the full framework, so one of the large benefits to using it is that code can be compiled for desktops without modification. You'll need to modify the UI for it not to look silly, however it will work ;)

    The .NET framework is basically a new object-oriented API for Windows - one uses it instead of the conventional API functions or MFC. Asside from the API, all languages that work within it use common data types and calling conventions, so one can mix and match several different languages.

    eVB and eVC++ are free, as are the tools to utilize them, however they rely on the conventional Windows CE API. If you write code in these languages, then it is going to need significant modifications to run on a larger platform. eVC++ is still necessary, as .NET isn't as fast as doesn't allow one to muck with the system-level stuff - however eVB is basically superceded with VB.NET (notice only eVC++ is available in version 4.0).
     
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