Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    Shatner keeps living up to the legend.

    tt4pk4w.jpg

    I'm sure he'll do something awesome up there, like yelling "Khaaaan! Khaaaan!" or tossing some furry tribbles all over the place.
     
  2. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Seriously hope they catch that on tape (modern speak: make a video of that)
     
  3. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Day care owner gets 6 years for hiding 26 kids in basement

    COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — A Colorado day care owner convicted of keeping 26 children hidden in the basement of her business two years ago has been sentenced to six years in prison after parents said some of the children suffered trauma including sleeping problems and anxiety.

    A judge issued the sentence to Carla Faith on Thursday following her conviction by a jury in August of more than two dozen misdemeanor child abuse charges and other crimes.

    Faith was only licensed to care for up to six children at her Colorado Springs private day care and only two of them were allowed to be under the age of 2.

    But police who went to her Mountain Play Place day care in November 2019 after receiving reports there were more children than allowed found 25 children in the basement, including 12 children under age 2, prosecutors said.

    There were two adult employees supervising them in the basement and one of them, Valerie Fresquez, accepted a plea deal and testified at Faith's trial, KRDO-TV reported. The 26th child who had been in the basement was picked up by a parent while police were at the day care, authorities said.

    Many of the children had soiled or wet diapers and were sweaty and thirsty, according to an arrest affidavit.

    When police arrived, Faith repeatedly told an officer that no children were there and that the home did not have a basement, but the officer heard children’s music and a child’s cry from the basement, the affidavit said.

    Another officer discovered a false wall and moved it to reveal the basement staircase, the affidavit said.

    At Faith's sentencing on Thursday, parents of the children and relatives filled the courtroom, telling the judge that their children have suffered trauma since being at the day care, citing sleep and anxiety issues, KOAA-TV reported.

    Parent Kim Marshall said that both of her children still receive counseling.

    “We sleep with the lights on in our house,” she said. “My kids are anxious. They are fearful of the world.”

    Faith's lawyer, Josh Tolini, said she had difficulty saying to “no” to parents who wanted to place their children at her day care and that the situation snowballed.

    She made some “incredibly poor decisions about how to do this,” Tolini said.

    Faith was convicted of 26 counts of misdemeanor child abuse, attempting to influence a public servant and obstructing a peace officer.

    KRDO-TV reported that charges against Fresquez will be dropped if she meets some unspecified steps.

    Day care employee Christina Swauger was convicted of the same charges as Faith and is awaiting sentencing.

    Link:
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/day-care-owner-gets-6-151114577.html
     
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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Wright Brothers go the wrong way: Ohio bungles new license plate

    We all enjoy a tale of governmental ineptitude, especially when it involves an error by a DMV: Ohio's new license plate design depicts the Wright Brothers plane towing a banner. However, the plane is backwards.

    e454209099acb402bdfb13ccfff9eaab.jpg

    In fairness, the error is almost understandable. Somebody in the bowels of state bureaucracy experienced a common misunderstanding that has made a few visitors to the National Air and Space Museum scratch their heads: The 1903 Wright Flyer's design has a small set of elevators in front that are normally in the tail on a modern airplane. And it's a push prop design — the propeller is behind Orville Wright's feet in this photo, as he lies alongside the 12-horsepower engine:
    6b2c350d97eb8009926ff04cb2aac147.jpg

    Fortunately, somebody caught the mistake before takeoff. Ohio's Bureau of Motor Vehicles says it's going to fix the error before the new design goes into effect. The banner of the new design retains Ohio's longstanding slogan "Birthplace of Aviation," so it yields no ground to the longstanding license plate grudge match with North Carolina, whose plate's slogan is "First in Flight." Both states have a valid claim. Orville and Wilbur Wright were Ohioans and designed and built the Flyer in their bicycle shop. They traveled to Kitty Hawk, N.C., to take advantage of the winds, and Orville piloted the first powered flight on Dec. 17, 1903, traveling 120 feet in 12 seconds. Wilbur had the best flight out of four that day, traveling 852 feet in 59 seconds. And the aviation age was born. Beyond the plane snafu, the new design is filled with sunbeams and wheat fields, and a kid and dog at play. Presumably that's not the Cuyahoga River at left, as it's not on fire. Our resident license plate critic James Riswick has already declared it "deep into the Toon Town category" of plates. Here's his critique of all 50 states' best and worst license plate designs. The plates will be available Dec. 29, with the correct design shown here:

    FCPgYbZWYAIRyE3.jpg

    Link:
    https://autos.yahoo.com/wright-brothers-wrong-way-ohio-150400858.html?guccounter=1
     
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  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Factory farms of disease: how industrial chicken production is breeding the next pandemic
    At least eight types of bird flu, all of which can kill humans, are circulating around the world’s factory farms – and they could be worse than Covid-19

    One day last December, 101,000 chickens at a gigantic farm near the city of Astrakhan in southern Russia started to collapse and die. Tests by the state research centre showed that a relatively new strain of lethal avian flu known as H5N8 was circulating, and within days 900,000 birds at the Vladimirskaya plant were hurriedly slaughtered to prevent an epidemic.

    Avian flu is the world’s other ongoing pandemic and H5N8 is just one strain that has torn through thousands of chicken, duck and turkey flocks across nearly 50 countries including Britain in recent years and shows no sign of stopping.

    But the Astrakhan incident was different. When 150 workers at the farm were tested, five women and two men were found to have the disease, albeit mildly. It was the first time that H5N8 had been known to jump from birds to humans.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) was alerted but, this being at the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, little attention was paid even when Anna Popova, chief consumer adviser to the Russian Federation, went on TV to warn “with a degree of probability” that human-to-human transmission of H5N8 would evolve soon and that work should start immediately on developing a vaccine.

    Global attention is fixed on the origins of Covid-19, either in nature or from a laboratory, but eight or more variants of avian flu, all of which are able to infect and kill humans and are potentially more severe than Covid-19, now regularly rattle around the world’s factory farms barely noticed by governments.

    China, where another type of avian flu known as H5N6 has infected 48 people since it was first identified in 2014. Most cases have been linked to people working with farmed birds, but there has been a spike in recent weeks and more than half of all the people infected have died, suggesting that H5N6 is gathering pace, mutating and extremely dangerous.

    WHO and Chinese virologists have been worried enough to call on governments to increase their vigilance. “The likelihood of human-to-human spread is low [but] wider geographical surveillance in the China affected areas and nearby areas is urgently required to better understand the risk and the recent increase of spillover to humans,” said a WHO Pacific-region spokesperson in a statement.
    Earlier this month, China’s Centre for Disease Control [CDC] identified several mutations in two recent H5N6 cases. The spread of the H5N6 virus is now a “serious threat” to the poultry industry and human health, said Gao Fu, CDC director, and Shi Weifeng, dean of public health at Shandong First Medical University.

    “The zoonotic potential of AIVs [avian influenza viruses] warrants continuous, vigilant monitoring to avert further spillovers that could result in disastrous pandemics,” they say.

    Factory farming and disease
    The WHO suspects, but has no proof, that Covid-19 is linked to the intensive breeding of animals in south-east Asia’s many barely regulated wildlife farms. Major outbreaks over the past 30 years including Q fever in the Netherlands and highly pathogenic avian influenza outbreaks have been linked with intensive livestock farming.

    Governments and the £150bn-a-year poultry and livestock industries emphasise how intensive farming is generally extremely safe and now essential for providing fast-growing populations with protein, but scientific evidence shows that stressful, crowded conditions drive the emergence and spread of many infectious diseases, and act as an “epidemiological bridge” between wildlife and human infections.
    UN bodies, academics and epidemiologists recognise the link between the emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses and increasingly intensive poultry farming.

    link:
    https://www.theguardian.com/environ...cken-production-is-breeding-the-next-pandemic
     
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  6. Hook

    Hook Helga in Disguise!

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    Lol. I'm reading this with "Don't Fear the Reaper" ringing in my ears (doing the sound check on my radio show) :vbeek::vbgrin:
     
  7. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Rick, almost every article I've read about likely flu pandemics starts with an avian flu virus, not something like Covid, whose origins we still don't fully understand. Past dangerous flue viruses have tended to be mutated mash-ups of pig and avian viruses, both heavily cultivated animals that can be in close proximity.

    And that license plate thing made me smile. As a kid, it always seemed so strange that the Wright Flyer always seemed 'backward' to me. We're so used to seeing the more common biplane format with the large wings leading, and a smaller tail structure behind.
     
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  8. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    Reminds me of the Far Side comic 'Beware of Doug.'

    A potato the size of a small dog is found in New Zealand
    November 4, 202111:42 AM ET
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

    [​IMG]
    A large potato sits on a toy truck at Donna and Colin Craig-Browns home on Monday near Hamilton, New Zealand. The New Zealand couple dug up a potato the size of a small dog in their backyard and have applied for recognition from Guinness World Records.

    Donna Craig-Brown/AP
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Colin and Donna Craig-Brown were weeding their garden in New Zealand when Colin's hoe struck something huge just beneath the soil's surface.

    As the couple knelt down and began digging around the object, Colin wondered if it was some kind of strange fungal growth, a giant puffball. After Colin pried it out with his garden fork, he scratched away a bit of the skin and tasted it.

    A potato.

    "We couldn't believe it," Donna said. "It was just huge."

    And not exactly pretty. Donna describes its appearance as more of an ugly, mutant look.

    But it's quite possibly the largest potato on record. When the couple lugged it into their garage and put it on their old set of scales, it weighed in at a remarkable 7.9 kilograms (17.4 pounds). That's equal to a couple of sacks of regular potatoes, or one small dog.

    In the weeks since their unusual find on Aug. 30, the couple's potato has become something of a celebrity around their small farm near Hamilton. They've named the potato Doug, after the way it was unearthed, and Colin even built a small cart to tow Doug around.


    [​IMG]
    Donna Craig-Brown holds a large potato dug from her garden at her home on Wednesday.

    Colin Craig-Brown/AP
    "We put a hat on him. We put him on Facebook, taking him for a walk, giving him some sunshine," Doug said. "It's all a bit of fun. It's amazing what entertains people."

    A more official weigh-in at a local farming store put Doug at 7.8 kg. The current Guinness World Records entry for the heaviest potato is a 2011 monster from Britain that weighed in at just under 5 kg. The couple say they've applied to Guinness to have Doug recognized and are waiting to hear back.

    Guinness didn't immediately reply to a request for an update on the application.

    Colin said he doesn't have any secret gardening tips. Usually they throw a bunch of cow manure and straw onto their garden and see what happens. He said they'd been growing cucumbers in that area of their garden before the weeds took over and hadn't planted any potatoes. Doug must have been self-sown, and quite possibly growing for a couple of years or more.

    "It's a mystery to me," Colin said. "It's one of nature's little pleasant surprises."

    But Doug hasn't proved an easy charge to look after. As the couple showed the potato off, it began drying out and losing weight. Mold started growing from its wounds.

    "He was getting a bit pongy," said Colin, referring to the potato's smell.

    So Colin cleaned up Doug as best he could and put the potato in the freezer, where it remains.

    But Colin may not be done with Doug yet. An amateur brewer, Colin said he's keen to turn Doug into a nice drop of potato vodka.
     
  9. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    That looks like some kind of oddball modern art sculpture in Photo #2. :vbgrin:
     
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  10. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta General Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Big_tater-1636086733-picsay.jpg
     
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