Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    < lelisa13p is oddly comforted by this example of how 23-year old surfers in Jax Beach haven't changed a bit since she herself was friendly with their ilk, also at age 23. > :vbtongue:
     
  2. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Raspy, that story about the cat puts the lie to the old saying that 'opinions are like xxxxxxs, everybody has one' right?
     
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  3. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    :D :D

    That could have been a great title for the story: "This kitten disproves the theory that opinions are like a-holes", or "If this cat doesn't have an a-hole, can he have an opinion?"
     
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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Dashcam shows plane making emergency landing on Pacific Avenue


    AUGUST 01, 2019 11:40 AM
    A dashcam video from Washington State Patrol shows the moment when an aircraft made an emergency landing in Spanaway.

    A single-propeller KR2 plane landed on a busy road in Pierce County Thursday morning after the aircraft had a fuel system malfunction, according to the Sheriff’s Department.

    Nobody was injured.

    The emergency landing occurred about 8:20 a.m. on Pacific Avenue (state Route 7) between 135th Street South and 143rd Street South, near Spanaway and Parkland.

    Link:
    https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/article233388862.html
     
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  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Doctors remove 526 'tooth-like structures' from 7-year-old boy's mouth

    The unidentified boy was brought to a Chennai, India, hospital by his parents because they feared a swelling of their son's jaw might have been cancer.

    A 7-year-old boy in India had 526 tooth-like structures removed from his mouth, according to doctors.

    The unidentified boy's parents took him to the Saveetha Dental College and Hospital in Chennai, the capital of Tamil Nadu state, because they feared a swelling of their son's jaw might have been cancer. Surgeons found a "well-defined bag-like mass" in the boy's jaw and removed it during surgery, the hospital said in a press release Thursday.

    [​IMG]
    Doctors at the Saveetha Dental College and Hospital found 526 teeth-like structures after performing surgery on a 7-year-old boy's jaw in Chennai, India.Saveetha Dental College and Hospital

    "On further evaluation by the oral pathologists, and to their utmost surprise, the bag revealed 526 tooth-like structures," the hospital said. "In the pathologists’ own words, 'it was reminiscent of pearls in an oyster.'"

    It took the doctors five hours to remove all the minute teeth from the bag, according to the hospital in the city formerly known as Madras. The teeth varied from 1mm to 15mm in size, each resembling a tooth with a crown covered by enamel and a root-like structure.

    "This is the first-ever case to be documented worldwide, where so many minute teeth were found in a single individual," the hospital said. "This rare lesion is termed as 'compound odontome.'"

    According to a case study from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, a compound odontoma is considered a developmental anomaly where tumors made of enamel and dentin are formed. Odontomas are typically detected in people by the age of 20 but can be diagnosed at any age.

    Link:
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna1038406
     
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  6. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Skywatching Spider Photobombs Perseid Meteor Shower

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    A NASA camera located near Tucson, Arizona, captured this image of a spider and a Perseid meteor on Aug. 5, 2019.
    (Image: © NASA)


    How do you spot a "shooting star"? Well, you don't look for eight legs; that's for sure.

    But a NASA camera designed to photograph meteors spotted more than it bargained for during the Perseid meteor shower, when a curious spider stopped by. The photograph was taken at Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter near Tucson, Arizona, on Aug. 5, 2019.

    NASA maintains a network of 17 all-sky cameras, which capture black-and-white images of the entire sky using a fish-eye lens. The cameras are designed to spot fireballs, which are meteors that enter Earth's atmosphere in a streak brighter in the sky than Venus.

    Related: Perseid Meteor Shower 2019: When, Where & How to See It


    All-sky cameras regularly spot critters that are a little more terrestrial than meteors. NASA has previously published photos of a bug, an owl and a small bird stopping by an all-sky camera. And this recent spider visit isn't the first time NASA has dealt with a photogenic arachnid: In 2007, a plumper spider crawled over a camera poised to watch the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis.





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    Another spider found space fame in 2007 when it crawled over a camera preparing to film the launch of the shuttle Atlantis.

    (Image credit: NASA)
    The Perseid meteor shower is traditionally the best one of the year, but this year, the streakers are difficult to make out against the glow of the waxing moon. The Perseids peak Aug. 12, when skywatchers could spot between 10 and 15 meteors per hour, and the meteor shower continues through Aug. 24. The Perseids happen when Earth plows through debris surrounding Comet Swift-Tuttle.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019
  7. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    I remember when we lived for 7 years in very rural Arizona. We would stand outside our house at night with no light pollution and no humidity and would get such a spectacular light show in the sky from these. Nothing like that where I am now. It's really breath taking if you ever get to see it under those conditions.
     
  8. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    I thought you were talking about spidergazing :D :D In my teens I spent several hours every day watching my beloved eight-legged critters, and yes, it was breath taking. Watching stars can be breath taking too. I grew up in the city, so the first time I really saw the Milky Way was in my late 20s, in a mine camp high in the mountains and far from any city. It was really awesome, how it spanned the whole sky from horizon to horizon. There was another light show below and far away, because I could see several hundred km of coastline (I was on the western side of the Andes mountain range), and the major cities (Guayaquil in Ecuador and Tumbez in Peru) were clearly visible in the distance.
     
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  9. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    by the descriptions of the Milky Way (above and elsewhere) I've not yet seen it…sigh
     
  10. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    A man's false teeth got stuck in his throat during a surgery. It was eight days before anyone noticed.
    By

    Rob Picheta
    cnn.com

    View Original
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    An X-ray of the man's throat, where his dentures were stuck.


    A 72-year-old's false teeth got stuck in his throat during surgery and weren't discovered for eight days, doctors have said.

    The man was having surgery to remove a harmless lump in his abdominal wall, but the operating team neglected to take out his dentures before the operation.
    He returned to the hospital six days later complaining of blood in his mouth and difficulties breathing and swallowing, which had prevented him from eating solid food.
    Ultimately, more surgery was needed to resolve the problem, which was revealed in a case report published by the British Medical Journal on Monday. Lead author Harriet Cunniffe, from James Paget Hospital in eastern England, is calling for surgeons to ensure dentures are removed from patients before an operation.
    [​IMG]
    The X-ray showed a semicircular object lying across the man's vocal cords.
    During the patient's first return to the emergency room, doctors were unable to diagnose the problem and the unnamed man was sent home with a prescription for mouthwash, antibiotics and steroids.

    But he returned two days later with worsening symptoms and was admitted to the hospital with suspected aspiration pneumonia -- a severe chest infection.
    Eventually a diagnostic procedure identified a semicircular object lying across his vocal cords, which had caused internal blistering and swelling.
    The man, who said he had lost his dentures during his initial visit to hospital, was subsequently rushed into surgery to remove the false teeth. He remained in the hospital for another six days.
    He returned suffering complications on multiple occasions over the following month, before eventually healing.
    The authors of the study wrote: "There are no set national guidelines on how dentures should be managed during anaesthesia, but it is known that leaving dentures in during bag-mask ventilation allows for a better seal during induction (when the anaesthetic is being infused), and therefore many hospitals allow dentures to be removed immediately before intubation (when a tube is inserted into the airway to assist breathing)."
    "In addition to reminding us of the risks of leaving dentures in during induction of anaesthesia when the Swiss cheese model of errors aligns, this case also highlights a number of important learning points," they added.
    "The first is to always listen to your patient. It has long been known that one gets the majority of the information needed to form a diagnosis based on the patients' history."
     
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