Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Drug In A Rug: Is That A Bag Of Cocaine Under Your Toupee?

    July 17, 20194:21 PM ET
    VANESSA ROMO

    Twitter
    [​IMG]

    The 65-year-old man — unnamed by police — tried to smuggle a more than a pound of cocaine under his toupee. He was caught by Spain's National Police shortly after disembarking from a flight arriving in Barcelona from Bogota, Colombia, in June.

    A Colombian man trying to sneak more than a pound of cocaine into Spain was caught with the package (poorly) hidden under his toupee, a Spanish police official told NPR.

    The extra carry-on bag was taped to the top of 65-year-old man's head, creating a very bizarre lewk as he disembarked from a flight arriving in Barcelona from Bogota.

    The National Police said it wasn't necessarily the Snooki-like bump that gave him away — he had tried to disguise it under a hat — but rather his lack of chill.

    The unidentified man, who was dressed in a blue-and-white collared shirt and matching blue vest, was behaving suspiciously as he made his way through El Prat airport last month.

    "His toupee was very curious, but the agents there have a lot of expertise and they pay attention to people's attitude," the National Police told La Vanguardia. "His nervousness was very noticeable as he was about to pass the security checkpoint."

    It didn't take long to find the stash containing 503 grams of cocaine, which police estimated could be worth about 30,000 euros — more than $33,000 U.S.

    The drug-in-a-rug story is not over: The harried drug mule has been charged with "a crime against public health" and is being held by the Judicial Authority, the national police said
     
  2. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    This may be the best ever…unfortunately, the video can't be embedded :(

    https://twitter.com/kzoogrowlers/status/1151167816122458117

    https://twitter.com/kzoogrowlers/status/1151167816122458117?ref_src=twsrc^tfw|twcamp^tweetembed|twterm^1151167816122458117&ref_url=https://www.wxyz.com/news/kalamazoo-growlers-6-year-old-coach-throws-epic-tirade-after-ejection

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1151167816122458117

    I'm having a lot of trouble getting the video to play; on work pc, asssume its my network; no clue as to the phone...
    EDIT: thank-you, youtube!

     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
  3. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    I'm sure there will be hell to pay in Bogotá's airport because of this. That airport has one of the largest security/police detachments I've seen anywhere. I pass through this airport maybe once every month, and I'm always impressed by so many guards and policemen. Plus you can be sure there's many more disguised in civilian clothes. Me and my co-workers have seen a few busts live, and it's always scary to see a person being removed (sometimes forcefully) from the line and into the small rooms. But Bogotá airport is the main exit port for drug going to Europe or the U.S., so I'm sure that for every bust there's at least a couple that manage to trick the filters. I guess most go unnoticed at the entry ports, so there's no bad publicity as in this case.
     
  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Deputies find toddler who took off on toy tractor at county fair in Rush City, Minn.

    RUSH CITY, Minn. (FOX 9) - A Rush City, Minnesota toddler sent pulses racing this week after he went missing. As it turned out, the boy got behind the wheel of his toy tractor and hit the road for a night out.

    At two and a half years old, Kenneth Allen may be camera shy, but he’s fearless behind the wheel. Early Thursday evening, the toddler went missing from his home. His motorized John Deere toy tractor was also nowhere in sight.

    "I was just scared, what was going through my mind was that someone had actually took him," his mother Lynn said. She called 911 and within minutes Chisago County Sergeant Jason Foster was on the case.

    "Me and my partner converged on the area and sure enough there he was on his little John Deere battery-powered tractor," the sergeant said.

    Traveling one mile per hour, Kenneth left his yard, hit the road and drove to the Chisago County Fair two blocks away. "He had the brightest red hair, you couldn’t miss this little guy," Sgt. Foster said.

    "I was glad to see him, but the first thing I did was pop the hood, pulled his battery and said you’re grounded," Kenneth's father Kristopher Allen said.

    Link to full article:
    http://www.fox9.com/news/deputies-f...tractor-at-county-fair-in-rush-city-minnesota

    Poster's note: is Florida's dominance in jeporady? :vbrolleyes:
     
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  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Surgery Gives 1-Month-Old Kitten the Anus She Desperately Needed

    Now that Cluck the kitten is through her crowdsourced surgery, she is waiting to see if her new butthole works.

    Cluck the 1-month-old kitten will no longer be the butt of anyone’s jokes.

    The rescue cat was born with an Imperforate Anus, a birth defect which caused her to come into this world sans butthole. As we know, everyone poops, so everyone needs an anus.

    In hopes of helping the innocent baby cat, Kitty Bungalow Charm School for Wayward Cats, the rescue caring for Cluck, created a fundraising page to crowdsource the $10,000 it would take to pay for a new anus and the operation that goes with it.

    [​IMG]

    Thanks to countless cat lovers out in the world, the rescue was able to raise the money and schedule Cluck for surgery. After waiting for the kitten to grow a little bit stronger, doctors put her under the knife for a complicated operation, which, in the end, resulted in a new anus for the little angel.

    Now that the pussycat has all her parts, it’s a question of whether they all work.

    “They did have to do a little more extensive work than just ‘make a hole’ as they had to bring down her large intestines and connect the sphincter. The question as to if either are working muscularly or neurologically is still unanswered,” Kitty Bungalow explained on its Crowdrise page. “And just because they aren’t working at first doesn’t mean they won’t work in the future. She is very young and those muscles and connections can still be made.”
    Rescue worker Shawn Simons said in a statement that there has been some successful pooping on Cluck’s part post-surgery, but not enough for the rescue to determine the kitten’s long-term needs.
    Regardless, this kitty got her holiday wish.

    Link:
    https://people.com/pets/kitten-gets-new-anus/
     
  6. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    Strictly speaking, not everyone needs/has an anus. Some creatures (snails and some worms) have a single opening for feeding and defecating, meaning they poop through their mouths (or eat through their anus, whichever you prefer). Tardigrades don't have an anus, instead they defecate inside their cuticle, and just acumulate poo until they molt, leaving the poo in the old skin.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
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  7. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    I know some people who are perfect a-holes. Maybe they could've helped.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
     
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  8. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    A peculiarly Dutch summer rite: Children abandoned in the night woods
    by ELLEN BARRY, startribune.com
    July 21, 2019
    AUSTERLITZ, Netherlands – Shortly after 10 p.m. on a recent night, a car came to a stop at the edge of the woods. A door opened to release three children: towheaded boys of 12 and 15, and a 12-year-old girl with dark pigtails and an emoji-covered backpack. Then the driver threw the car into gear and sped away, gravel crunching under its tires.

    They were tiny figures at the foot of the forest, miles from the summer camp they were attending, with only a primitive GPS to indicate the right direction. Darkness was falling. And they were alone.

    They peered into the night: Was this the path?

    “Could be,” said Thomas, the 12-year-old team leader.

    And then, because there was nothing else to do, they plunged into the woods.

    This is the Dutch scouting tradition known as a “dropping,” in which groups of children, generally preteenagers, are deposited in a forest and expected to find their way back to base. It is meant to be challenging, and they often stagger in at 2 or 3 in the morning.

    In some variations of the challenge, loosely based on military exercises, adults trail the teams of children, but refuse to guide them, although they may leave cryptic notes as clues. To make it more difficult, adult organizers may even blindfold the children on their way to the dropping, or drive in loop-de-loops to scramble their sense of direction.

    Sometimes, they hide in the underbrush and make noises like a wild boar.

    If this sounds a little crazy to you, it is because you are not Dutch.

    The Dutch — it is fair to say — do childhood differently. Children are taught not to depend too much on adults; adults are taught to allow children to solve their own problems. Droppings distill these principles into extreme form, banking on the idea that even for children who are tired, hungry and disoriented, there is a compensatory thrill to being in charge.

    Certainly, many adults in the Netherlands look back on their droppings fondly. Rik Oudega, a 22-year-old scout leader, recalled being pulled over by police as he drove the wrong way on a one-way road on his way to a dropping. His heart sank, he said, “because what I did was against the law.”

    The officers pulled up beside him and asked him to roll down his window. They peered into the back seat of his car, where there were four children in blindfolds, which, Oudega said, “is not really allowed either.”

    Oudega tried to look wholesome. “I’m here on a dropping,” he told them, hoping for the best.

    “They looked at each other, then they smiled at me and said: ‘Have a good evening. And try to follow the rules.’ ”

    The children on the dropping in Austerlitz, not far from Utrecht, walked into the woods, and the smell of pine needles rose from the sandy earth. The forest floor was patched with ink-black moss. A half-moon had appeared in the sky.

    For a few minutes, there was the sound of cars on a road, but then that, too, quieted. The woods closed in, becoming dense.

    That night was the first dropping for Stijn Jongewaard, an 11-year-old boy with jutting ears, who claimed to have learned English from Minecraft video games and “Hawaii Five-O.” At home, he spends much of his leisure time planted in front of his PlayStation. This is one reason his parents have sent him to camp. He has never been lost in the woods before.

    His mother, Tamara, said the time had come for him to take on greater responsibility, and the dropping was a step in that direction.

    “Stijn is 11,” she said. “The time window in which we can teach him is closing. He is going into adolescence, and then he will make decisions for himself.”

    After they had been walking for half an hour, the group turned off the path and into the forest, then paused, stood in conference for a few minutes, and reversed themselves. Ten yards off the path, a huge body leapt, thrusting, behind the leaves, and the children startled. A deer.

    If you peruse the Dutch newspapers with sufficient attention, you will find evidence of droppings gone awry. In 2012, German news media reported that five Dutch boys on a dropping in Germany called local police to extract them from the narrow space where they had become stuck, between a rock face and a ventilation duct.

    A “perilous adventure,” the Germans reported.

    But Dutch journalists seemed unimpressed at all the fuss, mocking it as a “droppingsdrama” and “a bit romanticized.” “The dropping is often the most exciting part of a camping trip,” one follow-up article said.

    Another report surfaced in 2017, when scout leaders in Belgium dropped 25 children in the woods, and then drank a number of beers and fell asleep, leaving the children wandering in the forest after their appointed pickup time. The campers finally rang someone’s doorbell and got a ride.

    “The parents,” the newspaper noted somberly, “were not satisfied with the incident.”

    Droppings are such a normal part of Dutch childhood that many there are surprised to be asked about it, assuming it is common to every country. But Pia de Jong, a novelist who has raised her children in New Jersey, said it reflected something particular about the Dutch philosophy of parenting.

    “You just drop your kids into the world,” she said. “Of course, you make sure they don’t die, but other than that, they have to find their own way.”

    Still, de Jong, 58, has begun to question whether droppings are really all that fun. “Imagine that you are lost and have no idea where to go,” she said. “It could be 10 hours, it could be the whole night, you just don’t know. It is late and long and people are a little frightened.”

    She paused, in thought. “I don’t think it’s a nice thing to do to kids, actually,” she said.

    In 2011 and 2014, children on droppings were fatally struck by cars while walking alongside roads. Since then, the practice has become far more regulated.

    The dropping team does carry a cellphone in case of emergency, and the scouting association requires participants to wear high-visibility vests and distributes a long list of guidelines, mainly geared toward traffic safety. “Pushing boundaries is fun,” reads one recommendation, “but that, too, has boundaries.”

    The scout leaders of the recent dropping, staring into the embers of a campfire, murmured about the proliferating paperwork, the way childhood has softened in recent years. “Society is changing,” Oudega said. “It’s a miracle that we are allowed to have a fire.”

    But the core experience of dropping, he added, has not changed.

    “It really is being on your own,” he said. “It really does make you feel that you are in charge.”

    By 1 a.m., Stijn and the other campers were well into their third hour of hiking. They trudged along a paved road in single file, too drained for conversation. Fifteen minutes passed, and then another 15 minutes, and there was no sign that they were anywhere near their campsite. Stijn was staring straight ahead, like a zombie.

    “My parents are sleeping,” he said. “My sister is sleeping. My brain is tired. My feet are tired.”

    They were bone-tired, all of them, but also adamant on finishing. One boy had asked to be picked up at the halfway mark, and that seemed to make the rest of them more determined. At that halfway mark, the children were given snacks and water, but in exchange, their GPS was taken away, and they had to follow their instincts. But no one complained, because there was no one to complain to.

    “I’m going,” Stijn observed. “I don’t know why I’m going, but I’m going.”

    It was nearly 2 a.m. when Stijn and the other campers stumbled into camp. There was a crackling fire, and boiled sausages tucked into soft rolls. Owls were on the hunt, and their shrieks could be heard in the tree canopy high above.

    The campers wolfed down the food, stared into the fire for a few minutes, and stumbled to their tents. When Stijn emerged the next morning, bleary-eyed, at 11 a.m., he considered himself a veteran.

    He no longer missed his PlayStation. And he said that someday, when he had children, he wanted them to experience a dropping.

    “It shows you, even in very hard times, to keep walking, to keep going,” he said. “I have never had to do that before.”



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  9. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    U.S. man on honeymoon in Caribbean falls into volcano
    more competition for Florida?

    A young Indiana couple on their honeymoon on St. Kitts in the Caribbean were hiking on the island's dormant volcano when the husband fell in.

    Mount Liamuiga, the tallest peak on St. Kitts, has a lush crater full of plant life due to its inactivity.

    According to his social media, Chastain tried to climb into it on July 18 using ropes that led from the trail into the crater.

    “I trusted the ropes with my weight too much and one of them snapped,” Chastain wrote on July 19, adding that his wife, Acaimie, who witnessed the accident, estimates he tumbled more than 50 feet down the crater’s wall.

    Acaimie Chastain told the Indianapolis Star that after her husband fell, she climbed into the crater to rescue him.

    "I was freaking out about what I was going to find at the bottom," she said, adding that no one else was around at the time.

    She helped get Clay get out of the crater and supported him as they hiked down the trail until they had cellphone service to call for help, the couple said. Chastain said he was “collapsing and vomiting” the entire walk back.

    "It was a miracle that he was able to support himself for as long as he did with the injuries he had," Acaimie Chastain told the Indianapolis Star, which reported that Clay suffered a fracture at the base of his skull, cracked vertebrae, loss of hearing in his right ear, and a severe concussion.

    “It's honestly amazing thanks to God's help that my injuries were not worse,” he said on Facebook.

    Because of the skull fracture, Chastain said on Facebook he was unable to fly commercially to return home. Instead, he needed a low-flying emergency aircraft that would allow him to avoid high air pressure. The couple raised $35,000 for the trip through an online fundraising effort.

    According to the fundraiser page, the couple, who NBC News reached out to for comment, was scheduled to fly from St. Kitts to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on Wednesday evening.

    OP note: all flyers know that commercial non-puddle jumpers do not subject passengers to high air pressure, but at cruising altitude the cabin pressure is lower than at seal level.
     
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  10. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    There must be a law ruling that this kind of things must only happen in Florida:

    Florida surfer attacked by shark opts for bar instead of hospital, friend says

    A professional surfer who was attacked by a shark in Florida didn't go to the hospital after the incident — he went to the bar instead, according to his friend.

    Frank O'Rourke, 23, was surfing at Jacksonville Beach around 3:30 p.m. on Saturday when the shark attacked him in the water.

    "Shark comes out of the water and grabs onto my arm right by my elbow," he told ABC News. "Kinda tugs a little bit and throshes."

    O'Rourke joked: “I guess it tasted me and was like, ‘Nope.'”

    His friend RJ Berger, who said he was swimming with O'Rourke at the time, said the shark "pretty much came fully out of the water, his tail like splashed everywhere."

    Berger said his friend kept saying "I think I got bit, I think I got bit," and noted that "once he got to the beach he just started bleeding everywhere, the blood started rushing to his arm."

    << LINK >>

    This quote from the above article sums everything there is to know about surfers, and maybe Florida also:

     
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