Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    :vbeek: :vbeek: :vbeek: I would surrender to the inevitable odoriferous coma. :vbeek: :vbeek: :vbeek:
     
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  2. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Rare snow rollers spotted in field near Marlborough

    [​IMG]
    A spooky natural phenomenon which makes it look like wheels of snow have been rolled on their own has been captured in photos.

    Six rare "snow rollers" were spotted by Brian Bayliss in Wiltshire.

    He said he spotted them in a field he owns and at first thought they had been manmade but there were no footprints.

    It is thought the bales are formed when wind conditions are ideal to blow chunks of snow along, picking up more snow along the way.

    [​IMG]
    Forestry worker Mr Bayliss, 51, said he had "never seen anything like it before" and when he got closer he "could see the sun through the middle, and they just made no sense".

    BBC weatherman Ian Fergusson said it was "very rare" that conditions were so perfect that snow rollers could be formed.

    [​IMG]
    "These are truly beautiful photos of a very rare meteorological phenomenon - called snow rollers or snow bales. Brian was very lucky to see these," Mr Fergusson said.

    "Conditions have to be just right for snow rollers to occur: a smooth, un-vegetated hillside, such as in this case near Marlborough, enhances the chance of them being formed.

    "A layer of thin snow, settled atop existing ice and not sticking to it, combined with specific temperature, moisture level and wind speed, are fundamental to the creation of these natural oddities."

    [​IMG]
    If the wind is too strong, or too weak, or the snow is too tightly packed, snow rollers will not form.

    The resulting snowballs look like a hay bale, a doughnut or a Swiss roll, and can be hollow inside.

    .
     
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  3. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Police: Woman arrested for driving under influence of vanilla extract

    https://www.wsbtv.com/news/trending...-under-influence-of-vanilla-extract/910332148


    by Bob D'Angelo, wsbtv.com
    January 26, 2019 01:48 PM
    NEW CANAAN, Conn. - A Connecticut woman is accused of driving under the influence of vanilla extract, the Connecticut Post reported.

    Stefanie Warner-Grise, of New Canaan, was arrested Wednesday afternoon, the newspaper reported.

    Police responded at 4:45 p.m. after a car was reported stopped at an intersection with the driver sitting behind the wheel with her eyes closed, according to the Post.

    Authorities said Warner-Grise had slurred speech and an odor of vanilla coming from her breath, WFSB reported. Police also noticed several empty bottles of vanilla extract inside the car, the television station reported.


    After Warner-Grise failed a field sobriety test, she was taken into custody. She refused to take a blood alcohol test and arrested, the Post reported. Warner-Grise was held on $250 bond.

    According to the Food and Drug Administration, pure vanilla extract must contain 35 percent alcohol, making it 70 proof. By comparison, the alcohol content of beer is between 2 to 6 percent, wine can range between 10 to 20 percent, and distilled liquors fall in the 40- to 50-percent range, Medical Daily reported.



    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
     
  4. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Did a Seal Eat Your Vacation Photos? A New Zealand Scientist Is Looking for You
    by Charlotte Graham-McLay, nytimes.com
    February 6, 2019

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/06/world/asia/new-zealand-seal-usb.html

    [​IMG]
    Do you recognize this seal? The image taken in New Zealand in 2017 was found on a USB drive in a sample of leopard seal scat.
    Photo by: via New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Krista Hupman, a biologist in New Zealand who studies the feces of leopard seals, knows they can contain surprises like feathers, fish bones and birds’ feet. But on Wednesday, she described “definitely the weirdest” find yet: a USB drive containing photos and videos of a tourist’s vacation.

    Now Dr. Hupman, a research scientist at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, wants to reunite the USB drive with its owner.

    The seal scat, Dr. Hupman said, was collected from Oreti Beach in the Southland region of the South Island of New Zealand in November 2017, and frozen for a later study of the animal’s diet. Two volunteers defrosting the fecal matter last month discovered the thumb drive and called Dr. Hupman.

    “They said: ‘You won’t believe what we’ve found,’” she recalled.

    On the memory stick — discovered intact and with the cap still on — were images of wildlife taken at Porpoise Bay, almost 60 miles from where the scat was collected, but no identifiable human faces. Some images included a blue kayak, which the researchers hope might be recognizable to the stick’s owner.

    Dr. Hupman is part of a team studying leopard seals, an Antarctic species increasingly being seen farther north in New Zealand. The researchers are trying to find out why.

    Four people have come forward to claim the USB drive since its existence was first reported on Tuesday, but Dr. Hupman said she did not believe any of them was the actual owner. Claimants have to answer questions about the contents of the drive, including recalling some descriptive file names.

    On social media, New Zealanders agitated for a resolution to the mystery. “This is the most NZ CSI ever,” one Twitter user wrote, while another rewrote the lyrics to the Police song “Message in a Bottle” to reflect the fate of the USB drive in the digestive tract of a “constipated seal.”

    Dr. Hupman said she hoped the publicity would encourage visitors to New Zealand’s beaches to help with the scientists’ research. Her website lists instructions for how to scoop up seal scat found on the beach, freeze it and get it to her team.

    “Weirdly enough, you can put it in the post,” Dr. Hupman said of the scat. “You just need to make sure it reaches its final destination in a frozen way.”

    2019 The New York Times Company.

    The content you have chosen to save (which may include videos, articles, images and other copyrighted materials) is intended for your personal, noncommercial use. Such content is owned or controlled by The New York Times Company or the party credited as the content provider. Please refer to nytimes.com and the Terms of Service available on its website for information and restrictions related to the content.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2019
  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Flying Squirrels That Glow Pink in the Dark
    by Veronique Greenwood, nytimes.com
    February 1, 2019 11:42 AM
    While ultraviolet fluorescence is common in birds, butterflies and sea creatures, scientists haven’t often observed it in mammals.


    In most circumstances, the flying squirrel has a brownish color, left. But ultraviolet light reveals them to glow hot-pink.
    Photo by: Northland College
    One spring night in Wisconsin, John Martin, a biologist, was in his backyard with an ultraviolet flashlight. Suddenly, a hot-pink squirrel flew by.

    It was a southern flying squirrel, a small, furry creature most active at dawn and dusk. Under most circumstances, it has a warm brown color. But in the beam of Dr. Martin’s flashlight, it sported a gaudy Day-Glo hue closer to something you might see in a nightclub or a Jazzercise class circa 1988.

    “He told his colleagues at Northland College, but of course, everyone was pretty skeptical,” said Allison Kohler, a graduate student at Texas A&M University.

    Dr. Martin asked Ms. Kohler, then a student at Northland, to look into it. After examining more than 100 specimens of flying squirrels across two museum collections and spotting five more squirrels under UV light in the wild, the researchers and their colleagues reported surprising results last week in the Journal of Mammalogy: The pink is real.

    [Like the Science Times page on Facebook. | Sign up for the Science Times newsletter.]

    Three different species of flying squirrel — southern, northern and Humboldt’s flying squirrel — turned that color under ultraviolet illumination.

    What the flying squirrels get out of it is still a mystery. Confirming that the squirrels are even capable of seeing in ultraviolet wavelengths will require additional study, Ms. Kohler said.


    Scientists suspect the flying squirrel may have evolved fluorescence to evade owls that hunt them. Alternately, the glow may have a mating function.
    Photo by: Northland College
    While ultraviolet fluorescence in mammals has not been closely studied, it is not unheard-of in other parts of the animal kingdom.

    Birds and butterflies have many brilliant markings that are usually invisible to humans, who can’t see ultraviolet wavelengths except under special lighting, but that are easily spotted by other members of their species. Fluorescence is common in the oceans, too.

    Studies have found that birds may use fluorescent markings when choosing a mate, and fish flash at other members of their species while darting through reefs.

    The researchers have some hypotheses concerning what’s behind the squirrels’ Day-Glo displays. Ultraviolet rays are abundant during the dawn and dusk periods when the squirrels are moving around. So it is reasonable to expect that the fluorescence is visible to other organisms even when there are no biologists with UV flashlights in the vicinity.

    The vivid pink color might have evolved to confuse the owls who prey on the squirrels. Those birds of prey fluoresce in precisely the same hue themselves; a flying squirrel may look, superficially at least, like a flying owl.

    Or, if it’s confirmed that the squirrels see UV, the color might have something to do with mating or signaling to other flying squirrels.

    “It could also just be not ecologically significant to the species,” Ms. Kohler said, noting that future work will delve into the question. “It could just be a cool color that they happen to produce.”

    More living things that glow in the dark
    In the Deep, Dark Sea, Corals Create Their Own Sunshine
    July 7, 2017

    Hunting Mushrooms, and What Makes Some Glow in the Dark
    April 27, 2017

    The Deep Seas Are Alive With Light
    Aug. 21, 2017
    The Gooey Details Behind a Glow Worm’s Starry Night Illusions
    Dec. 16, 2016

    © 2019 The New York Times Company.

    The content you have chosen to save (which may include videos, articles, images and other copyrighted materials) is intended for your personal, noncommercial use. Such content is owned or controlled by The New York Times Company or the party credited as the content provider. Please refer to nytimes.com and the Terms of Service available on its website for information and restrictions related to the content.
     
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  6. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I'd guess that hot pink color might keep Bullwinkle up at nite. :vbgrin: Having a roommate can sometimes be difficult. :vbsmile:
     
  7. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Tiger Found in Abandoned House by Person Who Just Wanted to Smoke Pot
    Tiger Found in Abandoned Houston House
    The big cat was found by someone who had tried to sneak into the house to smoke marijuana. It has been taken to an animal sanctuary.CreditCreditBARC
    https://nyti.ms/2E6UPtv

    By Sandra E. Garcia

    • Feb. 12, 2019
    It was like “Home Alone,” but instead of an 8-year-old boy setting traps to keep burglars away, a 2-year-old tiger stopped a marijuana smoker from lighting up in its house.

    That started a chain of events on Monday that ended with the tiger, left alone in a small cage in an abandoned house in Houston, being taken away for proper care at an animal sanctuary.

    “This is not the first tiger that we have been called out to investigate,” said Lara Cottingham, the chief of staff of the city’s administration and regulatory affairs department. “In the City of Houston you cannot keep exotic animals, including a tiger.”

    The big cat was found by someone who had tried to sneak into the house to smoke marijuana and reported the discovery to Houston’s Animal Shelter and Adoption Facility, known as BARC, the authorities said.

    Animal control obtained a warrant and entered the home to find the tiger in a cage in the garage.

    “They were able to remove the tiger from the building and took it to BARC,” Ms. Cottingham said. “It must have been quite an experience.”

    The tiger — whose sex has not been announced — was tranquilized and transported in the back of a horse trailer. It made it to the animal shelter safely and slept through the night.

    The animal was then transported to the Cleveland Amory Black Beauty Ranch in Murchison, Tex., according to a statement from the Humane Society of the United States. The ranch has more than 800 animals, including two tigers, the Humane Society said. One was rescued from a breeder, and the other is a former pet.

    The authorities are still trying to find the owner of the tiger. No arrests have been made, and any charges against the owner will “depend on what the investigation uncovers,” said Kese Smith, a spokesman for the Houston Police Department.

    Heidi Krahn, the founder and executive director of the Center for Animal Research and Education, a nonprofit organization in Texas that looks after exotic animals in need and is home to more than 20 tigers, said she saw the allure of having a tiger as a pet, but emphasized the risk.

    “When a baby tiger is born, they weigh about two pounds, they are very helpless and they are very cute,” Ms. Krahn said. “They become dependent on people, but by the time they are eight weeks old, they can eat chicken bones. By the time they are four months old, they can eat a calf, which is approximately the size of a human.”

    It usually costs about $1.2 million to raise a tiger through its 20-year life span, according to Ms. Krahn, and she estimated that they could cost $5,000 or less to buy illegally.

    “They are not worth anything,” she said. “They are a liability.”
     
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  8. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Finding a tiger would be a sure-fire buzzkill. :vbeek: :vbgrin:
     
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  9. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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  10. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    I had read that tiger story. The amazing thing is the guy stumbled on it while it was still alive. I would imagine that a tiger couldn't survive long without food and water (much like us).
     
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