Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Someone at Walmart™ (this is their brand, and, presumably, their marketing/pricing) ought to reconsider:
    Smaller_20180919_121611-picsay.jpg

    EDIT: OKAY, {damn Caps lock} just noticed that the Value Pack is slightly different than the smaller package, peanut butter & dark choc. vs. almonds, peanuts & dark choc. but still (esp. since there's no difference in price for the smaller boxes)
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2018
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  2. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Unfortunately, a lot of this is done intentionally. Consumers often assume buying the larger, greater quantity is a better bargain and fail to do the math (or even read the unit pricing label).
     
  3. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Jig is right. People became accustomed to assuming the larger pack/quantity was the better deal, so they switched it up to snare people who just grabbed the bigger pack. (Wish I could like Jig's comment many times instead of just once.)
     
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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    And in other news…

    Kayaker blessed by a seal, slapped in the face with an octopus
    (poor pun of the day: Loose seal brawl)

    A man kayaking off the coast of New Zealand’s South Island was clobbered in the face with an airborne octopus unleashed by a seal, Yahoo7 News reports. But here’s the best part: the entire inter-species aquatic slap fight was caught on camera, so you can watch it as many times as you need to get through the day.

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/26/17906542/kayaker-slapped-seal-octopus-new-zealand
     
  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    MOBILE WEBSITES CAN TAP INTO YOUR PHONE'S SENSORS WITHOUT ASKING
    WHEN APPS WANTS to access data from your smartphone's motion or light sensors, they often make that capability clear. That keeps a fitness app, say, from counting your steps without your knowledge. But a team of researchers has discovered that the rules don't apply to websites loaded in mobile browsers, which can often often access an array of device sensors without any notifications or permissions whatsoever.

    That mobile browsers offer developers access to sensors isn't necessarily problematic on its own. It's what helps those services automatically adjust their layout, for example, when you switch your phone's orientation. And the World Wide Web Consortium standards body has codified how web applications can access sensor data. But the researchers—Anupam Das of North Carolina State University, Gunes Acar of Princeton University, Nikita Borisov of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Amogh Pradeep of Northeastern University—found that the standards allow for unfettered access to certain sensors. And sites are using it.

    The researchers found that of the top 100,000 sites—as ranked by Amazon-owned analytics company Alexa—3,695 incorporate scripts that tap into one or more of these accessible mobile sensors. That includes plenty of big names, including Wayfair, Priceline.com, and Kayak.

    "If you use Google Maps in a mobile browser you’ll get a little popup that says, 'This website wants to see your location,' and you can authorize that," says Borisov. "But with motion, lighting, and proximity sensors there isn’t any mechanism to notify the user and ask for permission, so they're being accessed and that is invisible to the user. For this collection of sensors there isn't a permissions infrastructure."

    https://www.wired.com/story/mobile-websites-can-tap-into-your-phones-sensors-without-asking/
     
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  6. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Somewhat related to that, I was watching a fiction show or movie (can't recall which, maybe SIX), but they claimed the capability to help pinpoint a location of a video from analyzing the pixels for clues on heat and humidity. I wonder if that's a real capability?
     
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  7. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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  8. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    :vbgrin: X Infinity.
     
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  9. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Toddler shreds over $1000 parents had saved to pay debt
    HOLLADAY, Utah – A Utah family is figuring out how to replace more than $1,000 in cash that their 2-year-old son sent through the shredder.

    Ben and Jackee Belnap said they had been saving up cash to pay Ben’s parents back for University of Utah football season tickets. They had $1,060 in an envelope ready to go, when that envelope disappeared over the weekend. Ben and Jackee started searching the house.

    “I’m digging through the trash and she hollers and says, ‘I found it,’” Ben said. “She’s holding the shredder and she says, ‘I think the money is in here.'”

    Jackee said their 2-year-old son, Leo, is familiar with their shredder.

    “Leo helps me shred junk mail and just things with our name on it, or important documents we want to get rid of,” she said.

    Leo apparently sent the envelope through the shredder sometime when they weren’t looking.

    “We just, for like five minutes, we just shuffled through it, not talking. We didn’t know what to do and then I broke the silence and I’m like, ‘Well, this will make a great wedding story one day,’” Jackee said.

    It turns out the couple might not be out all that money. There is a government office that deals with mutilated cash.

    “I called the guy the next morning and he said, ‘Oh, we might be able to help you here,’ and I was shocked,” Ben said. “He said, ‘Bag it up in little Ziploc bags, mail it to D.C., and in one to two years, you’ll get your money back.’”

    Two years might be a long time to wait, but when that money does come back, little Leo will probably still be banned from going anywhere near their shredder.
     
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  10. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Birds are flying under the influence in Iron Range town
    [​IMG]

    The birds in Gilbert, Minn., are berry, berry drunk. Literally.

    With the town buzzing about erratic avian behavior, the police chief in the Iron Range city of 1,800 residents took to Facebook this week to let the public know what was going on.

    Turns out, it seems that the birds have been getting tipsy on fermented berries.

    “The Gilbert Police Department has received several reports of birds that appear to be ‘under the influence’ flying into windows, cars and acting confused,” Chief Ty Techer wrote Tuesday. “The reason behind this occurrence is certain berries we have in our area have fermented earlier than usual due to an early frost.”

    Techer’s post drew dozens of comments from area residents who had been wondering just what was going on.

    “This explains why I have hit 7 birds with my car this week,” said Rebecca Rankila Warwas.

    “I was going to say something ... but I thought I was crazy!!!” wrote Betsy Walli. “This has been happening to me!”

    Tipsy birds aren’t unheard of, said Jim Williams, who writes the “Wingnut” bird blog for the Star Tribune. But since most birds don’t eat much fruit, the avain alcohol problem is limited to a few species, such as cedar waxwings and robins.

    “Every once in a while you get a [fruit] tree that ferments,” Williams said. “It’s like drinking wine, I guess.”

    Birds usually fly above automobile traffic and are alert enough to avoid cars when they encounter them. But add a dose of fermented berries, and the birds lose their edge.

    “They’re flying low, they’re not flying very well,” Williams said. “It’s drunken driving, except they’re flying straight into people’s windshields.

    “They’re behaving like drunk people.”
     
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