Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Slithering surprise found under hood of SUV in Wisconsin
    OMRO, Wis. — A Wisconsin motorist was having car trouble when he pulled over to find a slithering surprise.

    Chris Nguyen opened the hood of his mother's SUV. Inside, he found a 4-foot-long ball python.

    Police in Omro responded. They tried to wriggle the snake free and called Menasha snake rescuer Steve Keller for help.

    WLUK-TV reports it took hours to free the snake, which had wrapped itself around the engine.

    The snake's owner said it had been missing for more than a month. It's illegal to have such a snake in Omro, so the owner was fined $313.

    Police say they'll dismiss the ticket if the owner pays for the SUV's damages, which fittingly include a displaced serpentine belt.

    Keller says he'll adopt the python.
     
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  2. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    #NoMoreMayo: North Florida town changes name to Miracle Whip
    MAYO, Fla. — Looking for a different flavor, the Town of Mayo changed its name Saturday morning.

    Plain old Mayo is out. In its place is the tangy taste of Miracle Whip.

    Well, sort of.

    Mayor Ann Murphy issued the proclamation announcing the temporary name change in a ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park accompanied by Miracle Whip representatives as well as a film crew that has spend most of the week filming in town.

    For the “name change,” the town received a $25,000 donation from the company for beautification projects.

    Murphy, stressing that there were no secret meetings held that would have violated the state’s Sunshine Laws in regards to the name change, said she wasn’t originally on board when Miracle Whip first approached the town about a month ago with what Brand Manager Molly White even admitted was a different, tangy idea.

    “I was like, ‘No way, because they are going to be really angry,’” Murphy said about the town's 1,200 residents, even announcing to the crowd prior to the ceremony that the name change wasn’t permanent.

    Originally the plan wasn’t to announce that fact until Monday.

    However, word about the proclamation leaked out Friday, in part due to the unveiling of the change on the water tower where “Miracle Whip” replaced “Mayo.”

    Even so, the event was still everything the company was hoping for, even if a little different.

    http://www.suwanneedemocrat.com/new...cle_fc095c68-a898-11e8-aeaa-a37baf7c18d3.html
     
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  3. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    NBC announced John McCain’s death — then abruptly cut to men kissing in dolphin masks

    Sen. John McCain’s family had announced Friday that he was no longer seeking treatment for his brain cancer. Then, just a day later, word of his death ignited a flurry of alerts, as media outlets tried to deliver the jarring news that the statesman had passed.

    For people who first heard the news while watching NBC’s Saturday night programming, though, the jarring didn’t stop at the announcement.

    On Saturday night, NBC was airing a particularly bizarre rerun of “America’s Got Talent” that included two sumo-size men who call themselves the Japanese Belly Guys. Then NBC News cut in with a special report.

    So one moment, a stone-faced Richard Lui was telling people that the former prisoner of war and 2008 GOP presidential nominee was dead at 81, and the next moment:

    For those not acquainted with the comedy duo’s full act, which barely escaped elimination from the AGT judges, the Japanese Belly Guys use a creative array of everyday objects to make sounds with their corpulent torsos.

    It is weird even when it’s not juxtaposed with news about a political stalwart who served more than three decades in the U.S. Senate.

    The interrupted act that aired Saturday night was a dolphin love story, complete with romantic music and masks shaped like the marine mammals. The performers used air nozzles to make their bellies emit dolphin-like squeaks — which intensified as the ‘dolphins’ moved in for a passionate kiss.


    Collectively, the Internet wondered what the gods of media broadcasting had just subjected them to. Some criticized NBC’s timing and suggested that whoever was in charge of the programming maybe shouldn’t be in charge of programming ever again. NBC did not immediately return a call seeking comment.

    Some said the late senator would have gotten a kick out of the bizarre moment. Others sympathized, saying the people in the news studio had no control over when news broke.

    But the majority reaction was perhaps perfectly summed up by one person with this tweet: “What did I just watch? What the heck?”

    [​IMG]
    Sen. John McCain in 2008.Photo by: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2018
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  4. scjjtt

    scjjtt A Former Palm User

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    I, along with I assume so many Americans, was shocked that the day after the announcement that McCain would not continue any more treatments for his brain cancer, he died. I'm proud to live in the state were this man served from in the senate. I'm grateful for those who have served us in the military and continued that attitude of serving when in politics.

    R.I.P. John McCain

    Sent from my Lenovo TAB 2 A10-70F using Tapatalk
     
  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Spaghetti mystery that stumped famous physicist is finally solved
    [​IMG]
    Don Lincoln is a senior scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. He is the author of "The Large Hadron Collider: The Extraordinary Story of the Higgs Boson and Other Stuff That Will Blow Your Mind" and produces a series of science education videos. Follow him on Facebook. The opinions expressed in this commentary are his. View more opinion articles on CNN.

    (CNN)Richard P. Feynman was one of the brightest minds of the 20th century. He was a key player in inventing quantum electrodynamics, which describes the behavior of light and matter. He invented what are now called Feynman diagrams, hieroglyphic scribbles that make it easier for lesser minds to perform calculations using his theories. He even played a pivotal role in digging out the core cause of the destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

    Feynman was a brilliant mind, a legendary trickster, a bon vivant.
    [​IMG]
    Don Lincoln
    There is, however, one physics mystery that he never solved: The nature of how a spaghetti noodle breaks -- or whether it was even possible to break a stick cleanly in two.
    In the book "No Ordinary Genius," Feynman's friend, Daniel Hillis, tells a story of a night when he and Feynman tried to figure it out. "Why is this true -- why does it break into three pieces? We spent the next two hours coming up with crazy theories," Hillis recalls.
    Eventually, Feynman gave up. He died not knowing the physics that govern the most beloved pasta. But last week, a group of scientists discovered a new piece of the answer. Their findings were published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and announced in an MIT news release.
    If you're a huge pasta fan like I am, you understand the problem. Take a stick of spaghetti, hold it by the ends and bend it until it breaks. Naively, you'd assume that the stick would break into two pieces; but it never does. The stick will break into three pieces or, more often, with little spaghetti bits flying everywhere.
    Now, the recent discovery isn't about why spaghetti ordinarily doesn't break into only two pieces. In fact, scientists have understood that for over a decade: When a long and thin object like a stick of spaghetti is broken by bending it in two, the energy of the initial fracture propagates back through the stick, causing the stick to fracture in multiple places.
    This results in the frustrating, time-honored practice of picking out the tiny spaghetti fragments from the crevices of the stovetop. The scientists who explained this annoying feature of spaghetti, Basile Audoly and Sebastien Neukirch, shared the 2006 Ig Nobel Prize in Physics (not to be confused with the Nobel Prize), awarded for research that first "makes people laugh, and then think."
    Until this month, however, it was unknown if it is even possible to break a stick of spaghetti into only two pieces. Spoiler: It is. And researchers Ronald Heisser of Cornell University and Vishal Patil of MIT and their co-authors figured it out. All it takes is a twist.
    If you take a stick of spaghetti and twist it before you bend it, you can break the stick into two. When the initial fracture occurs, energy is released as occurs in a normal break, but rather than propagating through the stick and breaking it, the energy goes into relieving the tension induced by the twist.
    Heisser and Patil built an apparatus that allowed them to precisely twist and bend dry noodles and test their calculations.
    This work, while whimsical, has potential applications beyond making dinner. The calculations apply more generally to determining the crack formation of other rod-like structures, like poles used in pole vaulting and other engineering situations.
    While the published calculation was specifically for cylindrical rods, it is clear that the approach can be applied to other generalized geometries that aren't cylindrical, like perhaps helicopter or wind turbine blades.
    Feynman, who died in 1988, would have been delighted to know that the solution to this problem has been found. While his most impactful research was at the edge of human knowledge, he truly loved physics and spent much of his time playing with conundra like the broken spaghetti problem.
    As he said in his best-selling book, "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!," his reasoning behind picking the problems he sought to solve "didn't have to do with whether it was important for the development of nuclear physics, but whether it was interesting and amusing for me to play with."
    And what is more fun than playing with your food?
     
  6. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    A good article in Scientific American regarding his brain cancer:
    https://www.scientificamerican.com/...the-cancer-that-killed-john-mccain-so-deadly/
     
  7. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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  8. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Reminded me of the "unsuspected/tragic side effects" from observing the fabulous meteor shower displays in The Day of the Triffids. :vbeek:
     
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  9. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Don't florescent lights produce blue light?

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
     
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  10. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    I believe LED lights also produce a fair amount of Blue Light. I'm not sure if how much time we aim our eyes at screens (we don't usually stare at bulbs) makes a difference.
     
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