Odd news of the day

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by RickAgresta, Oct 10, 2007.

  1. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    O.M.G. -- just shoot me now…

    Calif. Judge Rules Coffee Must Come With A Cancer Warning

    Coffee companies in California must carry a cancer warning label because of a chemical produced while beans roast, a California judge tentatively ruled Wednesday.

    The decision was the result of a lawsuit filed in 2008 by a California-based nonprofit called the Council for Education and Research on Toxics.

    The lawsuit targets Starbucks and dozens of other coffee purveyors under the state's Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, which requires companies with more than 10 employees to warn their customers about the prevalence of carcinogenic and toxic chemicals in their products.

    Acrylamide, a chemical compound that is produced naturally in the preparation of certain foods like the roasting of coffee beans, is on the state's list of chemicals known to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity.

    Nobody was debating whether acrylamide is found in coffee. But what was up for debate was whether it's harmful in java. The burden of proof fell on coffee brewers and retailers to show that acrylamide posed no significant health risk, according to the judge.

    In his ruling, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle said Starbucks and other companies did not show that coffee provided health benefits nor that coffee posed no health risks, reported the AP.

    In an earlier phase of the trial, Berle also ruled that coffee companies failed to show that the risks posed by acrylamide were insignificant.

    "While plaintiff offered evidence that consumption of coffee increases the risk of harm to the fetus, to infants, to children and to adults, defendants' medical and epidemiology experts testified that they had no opinion on causation," Berle wrote. "Defendants failed to satisfy their burden of proving by a preponderance of evidence that consumption of coffee confers a benefit to human health."

    The decision is at odds, however, with a large body of evidence that drinking coffee is safe and may have health benefits such as reducing the risk for some cancers.

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer, after reviewing more than 1,000 human and animal studies, stated in 2016 that it "found no conclusive evidence for a carcinogenic effect of drinking coffee."

    Numerous studies have suggested that coffee actually decreases cancer risks. One 2017 review found that a daily cup of coffee is associated with a reduced risk of liver cancer and endometrial cancer.

    A 2018 study found that coffee was associated with lower risk of death after being diagnosed with colorectal cancer.


    Link to complete article:
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo...-must-come-with-a-cancer-warning-but-should-i
     
  2. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    He should also require the warning on toast then...
     
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  3. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Henry and Baloo: Dog and cat travel companions gain cult following

    [​IMG]
    Best friends Henry and Baloo have a lot in common - they have both been rescued and now enjoy long walks in the great outdoors. What makes them special to their many fans is that they are a dog and cat travelling duo.
    Their unlikely friendship and hiking trips around the beautiful mountainous landscapes of Colorado have gained the pair a cult social media following.
    Hundreds of thousands of people follow their adventures on the photo-sharing platform Instagram.
    For owners Cynthia Bennett and Andre Sibilsky, their popularity is surreal.

    Link:
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43666657
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2018
  4. Mi An

    Mi An Nexus Refugee

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    Maybe, but I suspect Baloo thinks Henry is his personal 24/7 sherpa.
     
  5. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    He Ate the World’s Hottest Pepper, Then Landed in the Hospital With ‘Thunderclap’ Headaches
    [​IMG]
    A Carolina Reaper, the hottest pepper in the world. It has recently been measured at more than two million Scoville heat units; a really hot habanero might come in at 500,000 units. CreditLuigi Lauria/Alamy Stock Photo

    If you eat a really hot pepper, you expect pain. A lot of pain.

    In addition to the feeling that you have just put a live coal in your mouth, you may weep, vomit and wonder where in your life you took a wrong turn.

    You don’t expect a headache so intense and immediate that it sends you to the emergency room. But that’s what happened to a 34-year-old man who turned up at Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown, N.Y., with what clinicians call a thunderclap headache.

    His problems began when he ate a whole Carolina Reaper — the hottest pepper in the world, according to Guinness World Records — while participating in a hot-pepper-eating competition.

    He immediately started experiencing dry heaves — not unknown in the hot-pepper-eating world. But then a pain in his neck and head came on like … a thunderclap.

    It passed, but over the next few days he experienced more thunderclap headaches — that’s the clinical term — so he sought medical attention.
    Scans of his head and neck showed the kind of constriction in some arteries that can cause intense headaches, doctors reported on Monday in BMJ Case Reports. The scientific term for this temporary narrowing of arteries is reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome.

    Dr. Kulothungan Gunasekaran, one of the report’s authors, now at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said that for some reason the man must have been particularly sensitive to capsaicin. The Carolina Reaper is a popular pepper, and many people eat them and experience nothing worse than the desire to cut out their own tongues.

    “I was discussing the case with a nurse who had eaten three Carolina Reapers,” Dr. Gunasekaran recalled.

    The Reaper has been measured at more than two million Scoville heat units, the accepted scale for how hot peppers are. Measurements vary, but a really hot habanero might come in at 500,000 Scoville units.

    The patient was fine, with no lingering damage, but thunderclap headaches are not to be dismissed. For one thing, there’s the pain, which seems to surpass even the normal effect of the peppers.

    Dr. Lawrence C. Newman, a neurologist and director of the headache division at NYU Langone Health, said, “On a one to ten scale, it’s off the charts.” And it can indicate the kind of stroke that results from bleeding in the brain.

    It happens instantaneously. If that kind of headache hits you, it makes sense to seek medical attention “whether you’ve bitten into a pepper or not,” Dr. Newman said.

    The new study does suggest that capsaicin, being investigated for its role in alleviating pain and lowering blood pressure, can have unexpected effects on certain people.

    Cayenne pepper pills and a capsaicin patch, sold in China and Turkey, have been blamed in medical reports for two nonfatal heart attacks in young men, the result of spasms in arteries.

    But “we are not advising anything against the Carolina Reaper,” Dr. Gunasekaran said.

    The Reaper was bred to reach record levels of heat. Reached by phone at the PuckerButt Pepper Company in Fort Mill, S.C., the Reaper’s creator, Ed Currie, offered mixed advice on pepper consumption.

    On the one hand, he said, “People who eat whole Reapers are just being stupid.” But Smokin’ Ed, as he calls himself, also gave the impression that wasn’t such a bad thing. “We eat them all the time,” he said, with no ill consequences beyond pain.

    Mr. Currie indulges in other competitions of suffering. For instance, he said, he had recently taken the Death Nut Challenge, which involves eating insanely hot peanuts. He has a partnership with a company that produces them.

    “I knew beforehand I shouldn’t do it,” Mr. Currie said. “I was in pain for two hours.”

    For the average person interested in spice, not suffering, he advised using small amounts of any really hot pepper in food preparation, as they were intended.

    So if you happen to go beyond your limits — having, say, entered a hot-pepper-eating competition?

    “Citric acid seems to work the best to alleviate the pain,” he said. “Don’t chug milk because you’ll just throw it up.”
     
  6. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Rick, I read that article in the Times today. I'm known for eating hot foods and peppers; but nothing like that. I did once drink about half a bottle of hot sauce on a dare (yes, I was younger, stupider, and drunker when I did it). The next day was not pretty.
     
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  7. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Edmund, I'm having sympathy pains, just reading your post.
    Waiter, I'll have a double Pepto Bismol™, w/ a dozen Tums® on the side…and, are there any Tucks© in the vending machine?
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2018
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  8. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Want a mummified monkey found in downtown Dayton's? No receipt needed
    We can now confirm what has long been suspected about downtown Minneapolis: It really is a jungle out there.

    The people behind the massive makeover underway of the dormant Dayton’s flagship in the heart of Minneapolis confirmed Tuesday that a mummified monkey was found by construction workers.

    The decades-old remains were found by crews tearing down interior areas of the historic 12-story store, said Cailin Rogers, a spokeswoman for the Dayton’s Project development
    team.
    “We continue to find pieces of history in The Dayton’s Project as we redevelop the building,” Rogers said. “Unfortunately, this was one of the recent historic discoveries. We don’t know the origin or story behind this find, but we have been working with local museums to learn more and to find homes for artifacts like this.”

    Rogers added that the Minnesota Historical Society has received many pieces from Macy’s, which had its nameplate on the building until the location closed as a store a year ago after more than 100 years, “and we are working with groups like them to see if we can build ... a partnership” as the $200 million project that includes office, retail and a food hall goes forward.

    A photo of the petrified primate was shared Sunday by construction worker Adam Peterson on a Facebook page called Old Minneapolis.

    The intact skeleton “revealed itself in a ceiling during the renovation,” the posting read. “Does anyone know how a monkey would have ended up in the rafters of an urban department store and remain there undisturbed for probably decades? ... Perhaps some of you Dayton’s veterans know something about this? We’d love to solve The Mystery of the Mummified Minneapolis Monkey.”

    There is at least one theory.

    “My dad once stole a monkey from a Dayton’s display back in the ’60s,” Robbinsdale Mayor Regan Murphy wrote Tuesday afternoon on Twitter.

    Murphy told the Star Tribune that he learned of the escapade from some of his late father’s closest friends.

    “After he died in 2001, I went on this fishing trip with his best friends, and they started telling stories,” Murphy said. “He and his buddy Tom skipped school and took a bus downtown, and saw the monkey in a cage or some kind of display.”

    The boys used a jacket, “brought it home to Tom’s house” and left it there alone, the son continued.

    The pet project didn’t last very long, Murphy was told. The monkey trashed parts of the home and had no curiosity about the bathroom, he said.

    “They went back in the store, put him on an escalator and left the store,” Murphy said.

    That fish tale about young Larry Murphy’s monkey business appears to be no whopper. Dayton’s did host a “Pet-O-Rama” decades ago that was touted in a newspaper ad as being “a menagerie of delightful pets from all over the world!”

    The slice of wildlife on the fifth floor, home to the Dayton’s pet shop, included “hilarious monkeys,” various exotic birds and tropical fish, the ad continued.

    Regan Murphy’s mother said Larry told her of his monkey-napping back when they were dating in the early 1960s, but she married him anyway.

    Monica Murphy said that “it’s been hysterical” for her and her family to have the monkey memory rekindled by this exhumation.

    “Oh my god, we should have named it.”
     
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  9. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Restroom Hand Dryers Suck Up Feces Particles and Spray Them All Over Your Hands
    Washing your hands is one of the easiest ways to stop the spread of germs, right? Well, your office hand dryer might actually be spreading fecal bacteria onto your hands and throughout your building.

    Scientists comparing normal bathroom air to that blasted from hand dryer nozzles have found far more bacterial colonies develop in samples exposed to the latter. The results were published this month in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

    “Bacteria in bathrooms will come from feces, which can be aerosolized a bit when toilets, especially lidless toilets, are flushed,” study author Peter Setlow told Newsweek. The simple movement of lots of people in and out of the bathroom, shedding microbes from their skin, he said, adds to the messy picture.

    Hand dryers suck up bathroom air and spew it out at speed. So, in the brief moments your hands rest below the nozzle, they’ll be exposed to far more air than usual—and far more bacteria.

    In the study, researchers searched 36 bathrooms at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine for a harmless, lab-engineered strain of bacteria Bacillus subtilis called PS533. Unlike other types of B. subtilis often found in soil, this strain is only found in laboratory environments.

    The team found PS533 in every bathroom tested. Bacterial spores, Setlow explained, had probably traveled throughout the research building from a lab. Although these particular spores, which can survive for years, are “meaningless” for human health, their vast distribution shows that bacteria had spread through the air of the entire building.

    “Within a large building, potentially pathogenic bacteria including bacterial spores may travel between rooms,” the authors wrote in their research paper. Hand dryers, they added, could be one way such bacteria had seeped through the building.

    In theory, adding high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters should stop bacteria particles from spraying over your newly cleaned hands. However, when the team retrofitted some of their dryers with HEPA filters, they only blocked about 75 percent of bacteria. Although that's a lot, it certainly isn't perfect.

    “Perhaps the filters weren’t working properly, or the large air column below the hand dryers was sucking in bacteria from unfiltered air adjacent to the forced air column,” Setlow, who is a professor at the University of Connecticut, explained. Convection created by a hand dryer's air streams, for example, might pull in unfiltered bathroom air.

    Link to Newsweek article: http://www.newsweek.com/hand-dryer-bacteria-feces-hands-878925
     
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  10. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Mummified Monkey whodunit at Dayton's yields confession
    We now have a video confession in the Case of the Mummified Monkey.

    After news spread Tuesday of the discovery of a mummified monkey by a crew remodeling the former downtown Dayton’s department store, the family of one of the monkey-nappers came forward.

    “I can confirm the story of the Monkey told by Monica Murphy and Reagan Murphy,” e-mailed Jessica Christensen. “My dad Tom Netka was with Larry Murphy, they were about 15 years old when they stole the monkey from Dayton’s.”

    Christenson said her family heard the tale many times growing up, and even got their dad to tell it on videotape in 2016, months before he died in February 2017. They volunteered the video to the Star Tribune to share.

    Netka tells the assembled family that there was a pet shop at the downtown Dayton’s, and he and Larry stole the monkey.

    Whodunit?

    “We blame each other,” Netka says.

    He said it was a squirrel money, small enough to be wrapped in his jacket.

    After a couple of days as Netka’s roommate, the monkey was evicted. “My mom made me bring it back,” he said. “It wouldn’t stop pooping.”

    Do you think they went back to the pet shop, gave back the money and apologized? Think again.

    “I think we just walked into the store, just opened the door and threw the monkey in,” he said. “Me and Murphy, we did a lot of crazy things.”

    The tale unfolded after a photo of the mummified monkey remains was posted on the Facebook page by one of the Dayton’s construction crew members.

    On Tuesday afternoon Robbinsdale Mayor Regan Murphy tweeted that his dad, Larry, had once stolen a monkey from Dayton’s.

    Regan Murphy’s mother, Monica, said her late husband told her of his monkey-napping back when they were dating in the early 1960s.

    Monica Murphy said that “it’s been hysterical” for her and her family to have the monkey memory rekindled by this exhumation.

    But not all Tom Netka’s grandchildren could overlook the moral of the story.

    “Grandpa did you really steal a monkey?” a boy asks Nekta on the video. “That’s not nice.”
     
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