Nokia N810 Preliminary Review: Wireless and Wired Networking

Discussion in 'Other Device Manufacturers' started by Ed Hardy, Dec 17, 2007.

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  1. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    When I first posted this, I was still in the process of writing the N810 review. Since then, I've published it, but I suspect people will continue to find this thread. That's why I'm updating it with the final version of this section of the review. If you would like to read the whole review, it is here.


    Wireless and Wired Networking

    As I've already said, the N810 isn't a smartphone, but it can use many mobile phones as an external modem. If you have a phone with Bluetooth, and a data plan with a telecom that supports tethering, then you're in business. This handheld comes with an easy-to-use wizard that walks you through the process of setting up the connection to your phone. It just takes a minute or two.

    For the most part, though, you'll probably be connecting to a Wi-Fi network. Fortunately, the N810 handles this brilliantly. You can easily connect to secure and insecure networks, and its range is impressive. I have a strong connection while sitting on my back deck, a hundred feet or so away -- and on the opposite side of a brick wall -- from my access point. I can also see wireless networks all up down my street.

    If you have any shared drives on your network, they appear in this Internet Tablet's file manager when it's connected via Wi-Fi. This makes transferring files onto this device over the network an easy, if somewhat slow, process.

    And the N810 is just getting warming up. Bluetooth is good for more than connecting to mobile phones. This device comes with the driver for standard Bluetooth keyboards, so you can easily use a full-size external one. I'm using the iGo Stowaway Bluetooth Keyboard with mine without a problem.

    You can also connect to a Bluetooth headset for listening to music or making VoIP phone calls.

    But there's more to life than wireless networking. The fastest way to have the N810 exchange files with your PC is hook the two together by USB 2.0. As soon as you do this, both the handheld's memory cards appear as removable hard drives on the desktop or laptop, with no additional software needed.

    Incidentally, the device can not charge through a USB connection, so you can't save on bulk by carrying a single charge/data cable.
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  2. holvoetn

    holvoetn Still a moderator ...

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    How is the reverse communication working ?
    Can it be used to act as BT access point for WiFi-less devices ?

    Can the content of its storage be seen from Desktop PCs ? From reading this paragraph it is not totally clear to me ...
     
  3. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    It's possible there's a third-party app out there that can handle this, but I haven't heard of one.

    No, the N810 does not act as a shared drive. But when it's connected to the network, shared drives that are also connected to the network show up in the N810's file manager. You can then copy files back and forth.
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  4. Antoine Wright

    Antoine Wright Neighborhood Mobilist Super Moderator

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    Interesting, because PC Suite should allow you to view the internal and external memory cards as drives on your PC. It did with the N800, and other Nokia products as well.
     
  5. PinCushionQueen

    PinCushionQueen Oxidants Happen

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    Actually I can see the contents of the Internal storage drive and my SD card on my desktop when I connect using the USB cable. I'm using a Linux desktop though, so I don't know if that's why I can and you can't.
     
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  6. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    H and I are talking about when the N810 is connected to the network via Wi-Fi. As far as I know, PC Suite only does things when the device is connected via USB.

    If I'm wrong please say so, but I think you're confused about which connection we're talking about.
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  7. holvoetn

    holvoetn Still a moderator ...

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    I was indeed referring to the WiFi connection method.
     
  8. Antoine Wright

    Antoine Wright Neighborhood Mobilist Super Moderator

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    PC Suite does BT and wired connections (not anymore/yet) wifi. Memory doesn;'t help if whether I was able to mount the N800 over BT, but I know I did to the N95 so my apologies.
     
  9. Milhouse

    Milhouse Mobile Enthusiast

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    One option is to install openssh-server on the internet tablet, then use a standard file transfer client application that supports ssh - on XP, something like Filezilla works perfectly and allows you to establish a secure connection over WiFi to the tablet and navigate all of the storage on the device, dragging and dropping files (via scp) to/from the device.

    Here's a simple guide to setting up ssh access via PuTTY on the internet tablet. Configuring Filezilla is just a case of adding the site (ie. the tablet) and ensuring the system tray application PuTTY Pageant is running on the PC to handle the key exchange.
     
  10. fgol

    fgol Mobile Enthusiast

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    So if I have a Linux server with shared resources on my LAN, I can see the share names in the N810's file manager but I cannot get to any data because it is password protected. Since there doesn't seem to be anything that will let me log in, I guess ssh or FTP is the way to get / put files between my N810 and server?

    Frank
     
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