Nokia E7: the New Flagship Symbian^3 Business Smartphone Discussion

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by Ed Hardy, Sep 14, 2010.

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  1. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2014
  2. Hook

    Hook Hookette's edgy lately

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    Nice! Only disappointing spec is screen resolution (screen size is great), but it's ok. Like to know the memory configuarion and will be intrested in the more detailed specs. I hope it uses a memory card.
     
  3. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    H, today was more of a pre-announcement than a full one, timed for the first day of Nokia World. More specifications will come to light as we get closer to the launch.
    -
     
  4. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    I have no idea how well it WORKS, but it IS beautiful to look at. The resolution isn't terrible (if not state of the art). What's odd is that this is an E-series phone (previous versions of which were more 'BlackBerry like.') It almost seems like it should be an N-series phone (I understand it has a different OS though).

    I know it's not likely; but I wish Nokia would hop on board the Android bandwagon. Their hardware with Android would be pretty cool, I think.
     
  5. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    The hardware looks good and I don't think many people have doubts about Nokia's build quality. The only kicker for the NAM market is the OS. I wonder do that many people really dislike Symbian, even a greatly reworked Symbian, or are they just disappointed that it's not Android?
     
  6. Hook

    Hook Hookette's edgy lately

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    I'm not sure what you mean. I don't actually think most people care about the OS on their smartphone beyond the advertising telling them how cool it is. The problem for Nokia in the US is more the lack of penetration of their smartphones into the subsidized contract merket and the lack of push by the carriers.

    Beyond that, I think there are problems with their services, but Nokia hasn't gotten far enough in the NAM market for those issues to really arise.
     
  7. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    That was true a few years ago, but not any more. The iPhone, BlackBerry, and the Android OS are well known now, and people know that they want them.

    Just about everyone in the market for a smartphone is picking their device by the operating system. In N. America, that puts Nokia at a distinct disadvantage. Virtually no one here has heard of Symbian, and MeeGo is completely off the radar.
    -
     
  8. Hook

    Hook Hookette's edgy lately

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    That's kind of what I meant by the phrase "beyond the advertising telling them how cool it is." ;)
     
  9. Antoine Wright

    Antoine Wright Neighborhood Mobilist Super Moderator

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    THe E7, like the N8 is a pentaband device, success for the NAM market is soly on Nokia working with carriers - or folks like us just being crazy enough to pick up one of these.

    I like the E7, its not on my radar to replace my N97 (though would be a logical choice if there's not my wished for device and my N97 does bite the dust by the time its available).

    Symbian^3 operating system
    Penta-band WCDMA and Quad-band GSM
    4 inch 640×360 AMOLED capacitive display with ClearBlack technology (CBD)
    8 megapixel camera with HD video capture support
    802.11 b/g/n WiFi
    Bluetooth 3.0
    FM radio
    A-GPS receiver
    HDMI port
    USB On-The-Go support
    16 GB internal user memory, no microSD card slot
    1200 mAh battery
    Dimensions: 4.87 x 2.46 x 0.54 inches and 6.21 ounces
     
  10. Hook

    Hook Hookette's edgy lately

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    Again, I don't like not having a memory card slot, but for specs this nice it might not be a showstopper. I'm very happy with my Nexus One and doubt I will be looking for anything before 2012 (it is highly likely the N1 will get Gingerbread), but a device like this with a much more advanced version of Symbian will at least get me at least looking.
     
  11. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    Ed both beat me to it and said it better than I probably would have. For me, it's not the 'OS' itself that is so important (what language it's built on, the provenance of the OS, whether it's 'open' or 'closed,' etc., although those things may matter for some individually); but what the OS 'means' as far as app availability and utility, what it might mean for the hardware, etc. When I think of 'Android,' I'm not thinking of Linux, GNU, open, etc. It's the 'ecosystem' I think about.

    Unfortunately, when I think of Symbian, Maemo, Meego, etc. is: fractured, limited device manufacturers, little broad-based support, etc. There's just not a large ecosystem for it.
     
  12. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    I'm judging Symbian resistance by the amount of complaints I've found online about it. There's a general "Nokia should dump Symbian and embrace Android" feeling among the self-styled cognoscenti. Having experience with neither, I'm not qualified to judge but I have a feeling Symbian would be OK with me. And yes, I expect you're right. The general public, or at least those in the market for a smartphone, really just want a cool-looking phone that works.

    FWIW, my local Tmo rep says the little Nuron has been selling quite well and that the features work fine.
     
  13. LandSurveyor

    LandSurveyor LandSurveyor

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    Of course, we are still waiting on the new Windows OS and some sort of WebOS machine soon as well. Will Symbian be any worse off getting recognition than them?

    BTW, Nokia announced a couple of other nice-looking handsets at the same time as the E7. Why no mention of them?
     
  14. Palisandr

    Palisandr Newbie

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    I have been a long time Nokia smartphone user, but recently switched to Nexus One (from E71) and still consider that Nokia makes the best hardware (HTC is really weak in hardware). The fact that E7 has five frequencies for 3G, which will work on AT&T and T-mobile in the USA as well as in Europe indicates smart engineering (I travel quite a bit on business). Besides inability to add more memory to E7 specs look terrific. The Achilles' heel of all Nokia devices has been their language support. All of the modern OS (android, iOS) support a plethora languages, where Nokia holes you in your own market. I can not write in Cyrillic unless device is bought in Russia. Well, I live in the USA. Also, poor sync with Google services adds to frustration. On my N1 I am syncing with my business account (Google Apps) and personal gmail, both calendars are sync with my N1 and I am a heavy user of GoogleVoice.

    I think Nokia will still have problems in moving their smartphones in NAM unless they address the following issues:

    1. internationalization (ease of adding languages on demand)
    2. seamless integration with Google services (GoogleVoice), which are widely used in NA
    3. 3rd party app development (Android's international keyboards are developed by a 3rd party)
    4. calendar and e-mail sync using multiple accounts: e-mail (possible now through Nokia Messaging) and calendars (currently impossible to sync more than one through ActiveSync)

    I will be sticking with N1 for now despite frequent call drops, 3G issues and short battery life. Looking forward to Gingerbread.
     
  15. Antoine Wright

    Antoine Wright Neighborhood Mobilist Super Moderator

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    Speaking solely from my time with the N8 and experience with E-Series devices, this device should have amazing battery life. If some of the UI quirks are addressed, the E7 could easily be a sleeper hit.
     
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