List of Common Misconceptions

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Ed Hardy, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Adama D. Brown

    Adama D. Brown Brighthand Reviewer

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    To borrow another XKCD...

    [​IMG]

    In any event, reading through the Wikipedia article I was pleased to see how many of those I actually knew.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2015
  2. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    John Hanson was the first president of the United States, not George Washington.
     
  3. WyreNut

    WyreNut Palm Aficionado

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    "Common Sense" is actually not common, and at times can be very difficult to locate and employ!

    WyreNut
     
  4. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    Commonly held misconception: Skinny people have a higher metabolism than fat people.
     
  5. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    "Hey, watch it there. One of the bad sides of quoting Internet sources, is the inability to verify the true origin".

    Abraham Lincoln
     
  6. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    :eek: If that's true, jig, you're tearing my Elementary education to pieces! :D

    OK, I didn't get it. Who was the first President of the US?

    My two cents:

    #1
    The first Mexican President was Guadalupe Victoria, but he was not the first head of state of the (then) new independent nation. The first was an emperor, Agustín de Iturbide. Mexico was not born as a democratic, representative and federal Republic, it was born as a monarchy.

    #2
    What kills in a gunshot is not the bullet, it's the speed.
    I find this one incredibly ludicrous, and I've seen it IMPRINTED in publications as serious as Reader's Digest (serious, not flawless). The day it comes true, we will not load guns with bullets, we will load them with speed :D
     
  7. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    Okay, so maybe George Washington was the first president, but it's fun reading about John. :D

    -Wikipedia

    Also: Snopes article

    EDIT: By the way, did you know that not every former U.S. President is buried in American soil? It's a fact: Of the 43 former U.S. Presidents, 4 of them are not buried in American soil.
     
  8. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Pretty interesting thing about John Hanson. OK, George Washington was the first President of the U.S. And weird fact that not all former U.S. Presidents are buried on U.S. soil.

    EDIT: jig, that's cheating! :D 4 former U.S. Presidents are not buried whatsoever cause they're still alive!

    Now, regarding facts south of the Rio Grande:

    There is a kinda National Cemetery in Mexico, not quite a whole cemetery. It's a portion of the Dolores Hidalgo Civil Cemetery, in Mexico City, a portion called the Roundabout of the Illustrous People (Rotonda de la Gente Ilustre). Supposedly all former (& DEAD) Mexican Presidents shall be buried here. But some of them have never been here. For instance, Gral. Porfirio Díaz, the President taken down from power by the Mexican Revolution, and Gral. Ignacio Comomfort, who ran more than two terms in office under extremely conflictive conditions. Nor President Benito Juárez.

    The Roundabout of the Illustrous People is essentially an invention of the governments that appeared during the Mexican Revolution, and most of the official policy was mirrored in their decisions. The President that behaved in opposition to the people's will, the one whose actions sparked the revolution itself, Gral. Porfirio Díaz, cannot be entitled to rest there. He was exiled to France, where he died, and decades later his family was allowed to bring him back, yet he is not buried in the Roundabout of the Illustrous People. President Juárez is most certainly one of the most prominent Mexicans ever, but he ruled against the establishment. He promoted the total separation of the church power from the goverment, and during the French Intervention he aimed his power against the de facto ruler of Mexico, Maximilian I of Habsburg; both being members of the Masonic fraternity, the rest of the members of it certainly agreed that Juárez accomplished his duty as President, but never allowed him to receive honors being buried in the Roundabout.
     
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  9. Adama D. Brown

    Adama D. Brown Brighthand Reviewer

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    This is based on a theory called "hydrostatic shock," i.e. the belief that a very fast moving bullet can cause "remote wounding" effects through shockwaves transmitted through the body, and thus that a small, fast bullet is better than a slower, bigger one.

    The actual science is disputed, mostly because there aren't a lot of opportunities to line people up and shoot them in order to test what does the most damage. However, the real world experiences of police, military, and private citizens tends to support the premise that "hydrostatic shock" is mostly an imaginary friend of people who simply like small and light rounds and don't want to admit that they're less powerful.
     
  10. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    Oops! :rolleyes: :D
     

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