Laptop OS issues

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by EdmundDantes, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    From what I can tell, removing the hard drive shouldn't be that difficult as long as you have the right tools :D:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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  3. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    What brand and model is it?
     
  4. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    Not a bad idea. I'd work to backup the data first. While it may fix the issue, it also risks doing things to your drive that may result in permanent data loss, especially if the drive is actually about to fail. Backup first, then proceed. :)

     
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  5. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Yeah, backup is my first concern. The irony is that I WAS backing the bloody thing up when it happened!

    It's a Toshiba L55 Satellite. I bought that one because The Wirecutter, now owned by the NY Times, recommended it as the best choice in its class. Frankly, it wasn't a great computer to begin with. Quite flimsy, with some sharp plastic edges (which one guy on Amazon mentioned).

    Jig, I will took at that, it sounds promising. I did find another shop that may take a look at it. I'm a bit nervous about opening up the computer myself.

    Edit: Jig, I looked at it and it has some interesting stuff, especially towards the bottom. What happens for me is that I get the Toshiba screen and then it goes into that 'diagnosing PC,' then 'Attempting Repairs,' then it gives me the 'Advanced Options' screen. I tried some of the options, staying away from things that will wipe the drive. I'm not sure if I tried startup repair; but I do think it has something to do with the bootloader,

    A friend of mine who's a bit more savvy than I am told me that 'dual-boot' systems like those on branded Windows machines can lose their way as mine did. That seems like the most likely issue.

    I'd had something similar happen on Windows 7 machines, but the self-repair function always seemed to recover it. I thought the same would happen this time; but I think Windows 10 is much worse as an OS.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
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  6. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Jig, I haven't tried those things yet, but may this weekend. The tech friend I know said they may not work, again because of this 'dual boot' system where it boots to the Toshiba screen etc. first, before loading Windows. Apparently there's a small, separate partition for the Toshiba-specific stuff. Do any of you know more about this issue? It seems like the 'hand off' to Windows is where the problem is. Unless one builds their own laptop or specifically specs it a certain way, every one I've owned booted first to some kind of branded welcome screen (Toshiba, Dell, Sony, etc.).
     
  7. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    Edmund, depending on the computer and dual boot setup, you may be able to bypass dual boot and boot normally to Windows. See below (hope the image appears):

    bios.jpg

    This is my laptop's BIOS. I have dual boot, to Ubuntu and Win10. Notice that the normal Windows-only bootloader is present, but there's also the dual bootloader, and it's set to a higher priority than Win10's. Meaning that when I turn the laptop on it will select the dual bootloader, and then I can choose to boot to Ubuntu or Win10. This also means that simply by setting Win10's bootloader as # 1 boot option, I can bypass the dual bootloader and my computer will boot to Win10 as if Ubuntu wasn't installed. This assumes that the regular Win10 bootloader is present and in working condition, but if your laptop's BIOS has this option, I think it's worth a try.

    BTW, I just noticed there's a third option in my laptop's boot priorities, and it's also the Ubuntu dual boot, but I have no idea why it's there or even if it has always been there. I guess I'd better leave good enough alone :D
     
  8. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    While I'm sorry for the issues you're experiencing, I am learning a lot from this thread.

    Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
     
  9. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Raspa, I can't view that image for whatever reason, not even in a new tab. That's helpful though. My 'dual-boot' is that it boots to Toshiba first (or so my friend says, maybe he's not right). I don't have 2 OS's on the PC. But that might be helpful if I can view the image and try it out.

    I'm making very slow progress. I thought to search for 'preparing security options' and that appears to have been an issue plaguing Windows going back to Vista. Not much reference to it for Windows 10; but some aren't sure whether it's even a virus or part of Windows. In any event, it seems like bad news when you see it.
     
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  10. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    Edmund, the image is from my laptop's BIOS setup. It's the Boot tab, where one can configue several boot options, although the available options depend on the computer and BIOS model. In my case, my laptop originally had the Windows bootloader, but after I installed Ubuntu a second bootloader appeared for this OS, and it automatically set itself to first boot option , and placed the Windows bootloader as second option. So when the computer starts up it will look for the first option and run it, in this case the Ubuntu bootloader. Of this option is missing or -I'm guessing here- if it fails, it will then look for the second option, which is the Windows bootloader, and in this case it will bypass Ubuntu and boot to Windows. By moving Windows to first option, the computer will look first for Windows and boot it, ignoring Ubuntu completely. I hope this explanation doesn't make things more confusing :)

    In your case, I'm not sure how it will work, as I'm not sure what that dual boot from Toshiba means. My wife's laptop is a Toshiba, so it may have something like that. I'll see if there's something on her machine's BIOS that says dual boot or something similar.
     
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