Laptop OS issues

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by EdmundDantes, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Before I try Notebook and laptop review, I thought I'd try here first.

    I was transferring files from my newish Windows 10 laptop to my NAS. The laptop froze up and nothing would break the freeze (cntrl-alt-del, etc.). I turned off the computer with the power button and now it won't boot into Windows. I only get the Toshiba welcome screen. I took it to Best Buy and they told me the drive was failing, but I'm not sure it is (it's less than 6 months old, but could still fail obviously). I think because I didn't shut down properly, I messed up what my friend calls the 'dual-boot' system. Now I'm a bit stuck as to what to do. Toshiba will obviously fix the computer, but I'll lose all my data. Best Buy gives me different answers each time as to whether they can backup and restore my HD.

    Now, I've begun to wonder if I should buy one of those enclosures that turns an internal HD into an external one and see if a Windows PC can see the files that way? If they're not corrupted, do you think Windows Explorer/File Explorer would see them?

    Any other thoughts or thoughts on that idea? Thanks.
     
  2. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    Pending you're not afraid of cracking your system open, a drive caddie is not a bad idea. I use them on a daily basis at work, as well as at home.

    You can get a nice dual drive dock for $60 at BestBuy. Supports desktop and laptop drives. I've got this one, and it has worked well for me. http://www.bestbuy.com/site/thermal...docking-station-black/9062073.p?skuId=9062073

    Your computer should not suffer hard drive failure from improperly shutting your system down. However, you may suffer data corruption from improperly shutting it down. You can recover and rebuild your OS on latter, but on the first, you'd best try to get your data off it now, as you may not get another chance, or may have missed your opportunity.

    I use SpeedFan and have it measure the SMART stats for the drive to aid me in determining the drive health, and if it needs to be replaced.

    This is an example of what a diagnostic report from SpeedFan looks like.
     

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  3. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    Not dragging thread OT, but Dag! it's good knowing someone in IT who actually knows what they're doing!
    love-zippy.png
    .
     
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  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
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  6. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    Thanks Rick! It is what I do as part of my job. :)

    Sent from my SM-N920P using Tapatalk
     
  7. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    Also a valid approach, especially if you don't have a secondary device to do diagnostics / recovery on. Just be sure to build these disks before you need them. It's near impossible to build these if you don't have a working system.

     
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  8. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Wow, some totally awesome advice. My tech-savvy friend told me about SMART and also has something like the dock described, but he didn't have enough storage to dump my drive. I may borrow his or just buy one.

    Jig, I'm going to check that out and maybe try that. All I have to do is get my stuff off the drive if possible and then rebuild the system. I don't know why the built-in recovery function doesn't account for protecting the data or why Toshiba doesn't do that for computers under warranty.

    HeadCronie, do you think buying that 2-bay model is better than either an enclosure that converts an internal drive to an external drive? Obviously it allows side-by-side copying. But I will probably need to get a new internal drive for my laptop and then plug in my damaged drive to see if I can access the files.
     
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  9. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    It really depends on your usage scenario. An enclosure allows for semi to permanent use scenarios. Put a drive in there, never open it up again until you decide to replace the drive. They're a hassle if you're in need of swapping drives routinely. The dock is great for swapping drives in and out on a routine basis. It could be used for semi and permanent mounting, but I would think that is not the best choice.

    The work that I do, the dock is by far the best choice for me. I support ~800 systems and routinely have to pull drives to copy data, and check drive health. I have a USB drive adapter kit that I've permanently mounted to my system that I run a virtual machine on. By far not optimal as the drive is just sitting out on top of my computer, but as my office is secure, I figure it's not the end of the world.

    With the way warranty works, you'll have to send in the computer with the failing drive. You will be able to use either an enclosure to copy your data to another running computer, or if you have another drive, and you get the dock, you could copy your data to a healthy drive in the dock, and then send your computer in for repair.


     
  10. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    Definitely I see that for you; but for me I rarely will need to accommodate more than one drive at a time. As to your second point, that's the rub. Figuring out how to get the drive out, try to save the data, then put it back and then send off the computer (if it really needs to be sent off as I think Geek Squad just said it was a failing drive).

    I don't want to, but I may ask a friend who has a job similar to yours Headcronie (I think) at a big New York bank. Maybe he has someone who can figure it out for me.
     

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