iPhone's PIM lockdown

Discussion in 'iOS / iPhone' started by questionfear, Dec 4, 2008.

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  1. palmgeek5394

    palmgeek5394 Nokia N800 + HTC Wizard

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    I see. I haven't ever used Publisher or Frontpage, and I don't use OOo much. I only use Word, Excel, and PowerPoint enough to actually say I use them (Of the M$ SW, anyway. I use PDN and PS [and other misc. Notepad, etc. apps] a lot, more than Word and stuff.). Isn't Frontpage the Web design thingy with the IE dependence?
     
  2. r0k

    r0k Dazed

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    Yes, Frontpage should have been the root of many a class action lawsuit for the obfuscated code, open table tags, spurious divs and spans it littered pages with but alas enforcement is outflanked by technology. Stuff that no snake-oil salesman could do in 1908 M$ routinely pulls off in 2008.
     
  3. Hook

    Hook Her Clack is Worse Than Her Bite

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    Actually, Frontpage's current incarnation, Sharepoint, is even worse. :rolleyes:
     
  4. berylrb

    berylrb Mobile Deity

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    I think the Brickman chimed in, I would just add that in the past - SE, Nokia, Sprint cell phones - my thought was that it was the cell providers job to hand me a disk just like they did windows users to sync their product with my computer, just like we expect HP to hand us a disk or give us a link with printer drivers, yes?

    However, I am Oh so grateful when Apple includes the capability. That said, Apple does support several phones via iSync and has for years, its just that not all are supported. I would like to think that this lack of support is not all Apples fault, eh? Of course I could be naive too! :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 18, 2015
  5. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Certain thoughts arise from following this thread.

    The Apple marketing model is indeed some thing of a lot of interest around. Cause it's working, in the first place. Second, cause it spans more than one inner working model. Also, because it brought life to a company that a decade ago was sinking fast. Just how they kept afloat it's matter of another discussion. How do they work now?

    Macs have stepped out bounds the graphics designers' community, which was for years Apple's turf. Now more people have Macs and they think of it as a good option even though they are not even related to graphic design or similar. Their best feature for it is stability. OK, lots of programs for, say, Windows, don't have a mirroring program in Mac platform, but what can indeed be found for Mac works good, and Mac users usually don't tinker, as commented in other thread.

    A significant feature in the Apple strategy is that of coolness. But not just over external design, that is, appearance (cause it's cool to produce an iPod Touch among the gang). It's also over performance, that is, stability (cause it's cool that the laptop doesn't crash in a meeting with your boss). Now, there's a clear marketing strategy that wants to keep some sense of belonging. That's the iTribe. OK, PG has pictured the worst case in a guy he knows: the guy that doesn't know as much as to really exploit his device, but let's remember not everybody shares the curiosity or the need to go far beyond the brochures. Most people pull off their IT devices just as much service as to justify the purchase, and that's it. And, within a cool factor, IQ is irrelevant. That sense of belonging to the iTribe gathers brand, performance, similar tastes over digital tech, the feeling of being updated, and why not mention, money. Belonging to the iTribe is a matter of status. This iTribe thing is a clear phenomenon, but not everyone purchasing any iThing bites, or worse swallows, such bait. Many people go for the performance and that's it. Status has a limit.

    Portable players arrived some decade ago, but the arrival of the iPod traced a before/after frontier in that timeline. The iPod made history - period. It works good and it holds loads of music. Most players simply are built with the iPod as a benchmark. This, IMO, was the success that Apple needed to nurture the iTribe happening in the recent years. Next, several other gadgets came along to reinforce this phenomenon as a core show, but also with a growing number of customers getting interested in the iProducts without really getting into the iTribe.

    The factor that keeps on worrying lots of people is that, placing apart stability and beauty and friendly interfaces in its products, Apple is not quite in a hurry to solve interoperability. Macs and BBs don't get along. iPods, AFAIR, originally synced to Macs only, until that proofed unsustainable, cause maybe you can break the piggy for an iPod just like that, but not for an iPod and a Mac (& hope the piggy holds more than a grand in coins, that is).

    Over QF's opening post, my guess is that the simple PIM interface placed into the iPhone is due to: one, maybe to the original scope of such device, a cellphone with good surfing features and enhanced towards multimedia contents; a platform into which PIM apps were present in the sense of those in a dumbphone. Two, maybe that simple, Apple had stepped into a new business line and started with something, that would turn to be upgradable as the platform evolved; in this one, I personally drop the notion that Apple is keeping something to itself as to run a spinoff business out of the innocent buyers, for as Napoleon said, "never ascribe to malice that which can adequately be explained by incompetence"; perhaps the guys just didn't know that much about PIM apps. Third, and here is my best guess, a platform so web-oriented, may just as well gather many things with OTA services without needing many local apps (that is, installed in the device); how about improving the MobileMe service to the point that all the PIM enhanced features are OTA-available, and just an access portion is local (just as a side example, like Facebook for Palm); BTW, FranklinCovey already offers a similar service called FranklinCovey Online, using WM devices with Pocket Informant and a proprietary software for kinda OTA group services; that way, PIM apps would be floating in the net and the user could reach them with the iPhone or with (this point unsolved) a Mac. The third is my best guess cause it's been the whole point of ubiquity of the personal critical information that actually made the Palm platform strong, but with a handheld and a computer; how about that same thing but floating in the Net (and working, r0k would add). If Apple would spring some open competitor program to Outlook, I bet it'd work as the local interface for such MobileMe enhanced thing. Both, iPhone and Outlook-similar, may be PIM and email thin clients.

    Thin client is a modern focus to solve the storage and safety of information. It necessarily works over net services. But it solves quite a lot of issues, where the net access is not an issue itself, though. And the thin client is not just a corporate option, for as a recent example, netbooks are the consumer market approach to the thin client focus.
     
  6. r0k

    r0k Dazed

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    iSync supported lots of phones in the past, before Apple had a phone market to protect. Logic would seem to indicate Apple will continue to support a lot of phones with iSync, but... if Apple were to adopt a more M$-ish model, perhaps they would block other phones or make it more difficult to sync other phones. Not really something I expect them to do, but something that would be along the lines of the M$ approach to the web or even Apple's approach to locking competing apps out of the app store.

    @Hal: That's an interesting observation that ipods may have originally sync'd with Mac only. Since itunes has been on windows for a long time, I doubt that's the case. But it is fair to say that in everything Apple does, there is a behind the scenes agenda to lead all users to Mac computers and OS X. iPhone and iPod are profitable, but Apple really wants to sell computers and when users are impressed with their portable players they begin to wonder if the desktop OS X experience is along the same lines. I would like to see Apple stick to this approach, attracting users by doing things well, rather than adopting an approach similar to M$ that you must buy an Apple product to enjoy seamless interoperability.
     
  7. Hook

    Hook Her Clack is Worse Than Her Bite

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    I believe hal is right, the iPod was Mac only when it was first introduced. Also, iPods used to have separate software, before iTunes Store integration. The iTunes store was Mac only for it's first year. The windows version added the non-DRM WMA converter.
     
  8. r0k

    r0k Dazed

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    oops. In a previous post I said I didn't want Apple to adopt a M$ approach and force you to buy everything from them to enjoy seamless interoperability. I forgot to mention that in the M$ world, seamless interoperability doesn't really exist. I should have said "force you to buy everything from them by promising you would enjoy seamless interoperability".

    @hook: I'm not surprised that the ipod worked first with Mac but given desktop OS market share, I bet that situation didn't last long. Apple got right on making itunes and ipod work with windows. There is a concrete example of Apple doing "platform bullying". They don't allow you to connect to MobileMe with Firefox running on Linux. Either Apple views Linux as more of a threat than Windows, or they care less about what Linux users think about Apple.
     
  9. Hook

    Hook Her Clack is Worse Than Her Bite

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    Probably the latter. Their target audience are not tweakers. In fact, a lot of their advertising from "It just works" to "Mac and PC" is aimed at convincing Windows users they don't need to be tweakers. In point of fact, I think they are right. The majority of users out there (not necessarily this forum) just want something that works most of the time, first time.

    I remember one great commercial Apple did a couple of years back was to tell Windows users that they really didn't need to worry about a learnng curve in switching to Apple (that was the implication, not what they aid). The pointed to the iTunes interface and said "You already know how to use it."

    Bingo. ;)
     
  10. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Just about the sideline example of the iPod: Hook & me, both kinda remembered the iPod originally synced with Macs only (if we can take the WikiPedia for a reasonably good source):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPod

    Get to the part of Software. There it is.
     
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