iPhone's PIM lockdown

Discussion in 'iOS / iPhone' started by questionfear, Dec 4, 2008.

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  1. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    I was thinking on my drive to work this morning about Apple's PIM lockdown and why they won't let devs have access to the calendar, but they'll let them go hog wild on contacts.

    Here's my theory: Apple plans to release a "pro" version of their PIM, either as an upgrade or standard on the phone, but at some point in the future.

    They've obviously been pushing mail into the direction of being more outlook-ish, with tasks and notes integrated. Plus they've got their word, spreadsheet and powerpoint programs as well. Combine that with the exchange support in the iPhone, and there's a pattern; the iPhone is the same trojan horse on the business side as it is on the consumer side. The whole purpose is to draw people into the Mac OS ecosystem, and the best way to lure businesses is to compete with outlook.

    It's not a perfect theory, but it's as good as any to explain why Apple steadfastly refuses to allow anyone to sync with to-dos in iCal, and why no 3rd party can create a task program with alarms or have access to the calendar APIs in the SDK.

    Any thoughts on my wild speculation?
     
  2. berylrb

    berylrb Mobile Deity

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    right on, I see January, Q4 has Apple on top, 30% US Market, Apple needs to do something to counter RIM Storm, Android, and Nokia's Symbian redo. Hardware is not the issue to stay on top, software is seems to be.

    The only thing I'd push back on is your great metaphor of "trojan horse," that implies that Apple all along has had a strategy to delay and introduce new features at a certain pace (recall iPod), that's so not like them :p:p:p
     
  3. palmgeek5394

    palmgeek5394 Nokia N800 + HTC Wizard

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    Meh. Knowing a bit about Apple, I don't think we'll ever fully know why they do some of the stuff they do. But this is a good possibility. If they add copy/paste/text select, un-cripple the GPS, allow BT tethering, and allow changes, I might be interested. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Hook

    Hook Nexus or Nothin'

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    Watch it. You are getting close to deserving the horse. ;)
     
  5. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    You know, I can't figure out some of the missing features (like copy/paste) but I am basing my "pro calendar/outlook competitor" assumption on the way Apple has behaved against apps that compete with what they've got coming down the pike, like the podcast app that was rejected and then POOF there's OTA podcasts in the update.

    Plus really, in the end, everything Apple sells that is not a computer is designed to make everyone want an Apple computer...and that might help lure more people.
     
  6. berylrb

    berylrb Mobile Deity

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    right on, weird you just gave me an insight! i wonder if in general we don't realize in the front of our mind that Apple is in essence the new kid on the block that is in it for the long haul, thus, the paradigm they use is different, they want to make money and sustain dominance. They aren't just focused on satisfying consumers, rather on, like you said "(designing) to make everyone want an Apple computer."

    That's huge and a completely different business model than RIM, Nokia, Palm, HTC, Samsung, SE, ... did I miss anyone? :eek: :eek: :eek:

    Maybe HP has the same model, but being stuck on the WM OS, I'm not sure how to think of them, hmmm?

    But surely the real competition as stated above, aren't playing to win customers to a holistic platform, rather simply every 2-4 years consider coming back. Completely different customer supplier relationship that Apple is producing products for! Yeah? :p
     
  7. palmgeek5394

    palmgeek5394 Nokia N800 + HTC Wizard

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    @ Hook: You mean this? [​IMG] :rolleyes:

    @ QF: Wow. That... That sounds exactly like Apple. Clever...
     
  8. Hook

    Hook Nexus or Nothin'

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    Yup That's the one. ;)
     
  9. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    Poor horsey.....plus that guy's arm must get tired after a while.
     
  10. Green Loontern

    Green Loontern Gustatus similis pullus

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    I look at Apple's business model like this:

    Phone and smartphone manufacturers don't really sell their hardware to consumers. They sell them in bulk to cell/data service providers. The service providers then use the hardware as bait to lure us into their service plans.

    Apple's iPhone is terrific bait, which means that Apple can sell a lot of iPhones at premium prices to service providers. In fact, Apple was able to get certain service providers to pay even more for iPhones in exchange for exclusive contracts (AT&T, Rogers, O2 etc.).

    In addition to the big ball of money Apple gets from these exclusive contracts, Apple also earns money in the back end by locking consumers into their iTunes service, effectively delivering them to developers and content providers, for a fee, as an exclusive market.

    What does this mean for development? It means that Apple is developing iPhone hardware not to suit consumers, but rather to suit service providers' ideas of what will attract consumers.

    Likewise, Apple cultivates the offerings in iTunes not to suit consumers, but rather to suit developer's and content providers' ideas of what consumers will buy.
     
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