I Need to Be Converted...

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by lelisa13p, Nov 8, 2018.

  1. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    As an aside, I have never kept track of generations of processors. Your post left me wanting to know the generation of my system.

    1st generation (Lynnfield series). Top of the line Xeon x3470 that I snagged off ebay for $50 used. Works for my needs, but ancient by current standards. Wheeze... :D

    Your 4th gen i5 could be budget and come in with less processing power than mine which would limit your options. Or it could be middle of the road or high end and give you plenty of options and leave me in the dust.

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Note 8 using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018
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  2. z22 2006 User

    z22 2006 User BHOT's Own Fluffy

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    Looks like it's a 3ghz i5-4430
     
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  3. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    That will work just fine in my opinion. :)

    https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i5-4430+@+3.00GHz&id=1924

    You want a cpu mark score of 2000 for each concurrent transcode of a 1080p video. You should be able to do 2 at once pretty easy.

    A DVD rip will take between 3-7gb of drive space. A Blueray rip is around 40-60gb I think. A 2TB drive will hold around 300 DVD movies.

    You will want your 'server' to be hardwired to your network.

    Any current player within you home network should be able to direct play your content pending you have good wireless coverage.

    Outside your network, your server will need to transcode to reduce the bitrate to accommodate the minimal upload bandwidth most home ISPs provide. Your CPU should handle that pretty easy with your media you want to host.

    Got more questions? Let me know. :)

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  4. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Hmmmmm..... I have a Lenovo G580 Laptop: Intel Core i3-3120M (2.5 GHz), that's not being used for anything. That could end up being a decent HTPC.

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  5. z22 2006 User

    z22 2006 User BHOT's Own Fluffy

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    Neat, thanks for the guidance!

    *jots it down on a notepad, putting it with all the other "to do"s of life*
     
  6. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    Should be able to do a single concurrent 1080p transcode or handle multiple DVD transcodes. Just be sure to let your laptop breathe by keeping it open and, vents unobstructed and dust free. :)

    Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Note 8 using Tapatalk
     
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  7. EdmundDantes

    EdmundDantes Mobile Deity

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    I actually have a NAS (Synology DS214play) that transcodes on the fly; but I actually don't really use that feature much. When I rip discs, I rip them to file formats that VLC plays directly. I recently did an unscientific a/b test because I've always been curious if some of the higher bitrate rips really make a difference and I'm not convinced they do. I recently compared a couple of shows between the broadcast standard (1080i) to 1080p rips that varied in file size and frankly, on a 50-inch plasma TV, I could not really differentiate between the broadcast (played from on-demand FiOS) to the file played on a Mac Mini with VLC. Doubling the bitrate and file size didn't seem to make a difference. The file actually seemed a bit better than the same episode from FiOS on-demand. Ripping to about 1-1.5 GB/hour gives a pretty good result. I've seen files ripped to 4 GB or more/hour and I don't see the return.
     
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  8. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    VLC plays anything. It's the Swiss army knife of video players. If VLC can't play it, you've got a very unique format. Your scenario with a NAS and VLC should work quite well.

    I can't provide any useful comment on higher bitrate, or higher resolution stuff. I'm still ripping 480p DVDs even though I have 1080p TVs. I figure I don't need to see the pores of the actors skin to enjoy a movie. :)
     
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  9. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    I had to look up your system, as I'm not knowledgeable on NAS systems in any manner. Nothing crazy powerful, which is what you would expect from an Atom processor, other than it is new enough to have built in transcoding in the chipset. That's pretty nice. I've got no such luck with my rig. I have to rely on horsepower of my 1st generation Xeon to plow through transcoding. Your option is better suited pending you don't do any other tasks on your NAS. I've got other things running on my server, including Hyper-V so I couldn't go your route.
     
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  10. raspabalsa

    raspabalsa Brain stuck BogoMipping

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    I have a NetGear ReadyNAS RN-214, and it has transcoding built-in. But I also rip to formats that can be played without transcoding. As HC said, VLC can read everything, and so does MX Player on my Android devices. On Android I stream with Bubble UPnP. I usually rip using MKV container with a H.264 video codec. I've also done some very unscientific comparisons, and agree that anything over 1080 is overkill, at least for my eyesight and TV (46" LCD). But I've also been playing with the H.265 codec, and found it gives the same quality at a much smaller file. For the settings I usually use on Handbrake, a 2-hour movie may take 1.5GB to 2GB on H.264, but less than 1GB on H.265, other settings equal. I think H.265 demands more on the network and player, but streams fine on my 100 Mbps Ethernet.

    I used to have my media on a self-built desktop, but used it as a file server only, sharing via SMB (vanilla Windows shares) and Plex. But I never did like Plex that much, and then my desktop started to show its age. Upgrading meant changing mainboard, CPU, RAM, and possibly a new Win10 license, and that's when I decided to get a NAS. The four-bay device I got is a mid-level NAS, but it was desgined with media sharing in mind. It's even advertised as "optimized for Plex" or something like that. Still, I don't use Plex on it, but SMB shares, so no transcoding. All my devices (Win computers, Android with BubbleUPnP, WD TV meadia player) see the NAS as a network share.
     

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