How to Increase the Battery Life of Apple's iPhone 4S Discussion

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by Ed Hardy, Nov 3, 2011.

  1. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    Many of those with an iPhone 4S have complaints about the battery life. Apple has acknowledged these problems, and is working to fix them. In the meantime, users of this new smartphone can make a few changes on their own that will increase their time between charges.

    Read the full content of this Article: How to Increase the Battery Life of Apple's iPhone 4S

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 20, 2015
  2. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    An additional suggestion is to be patient and let the iPhone 4S run through a few battery cycles. Your device needs to learn what its own battery life is, and until it does its estimates on how long it can last on single charge are going to be inaccurate. So if your new brand device tells you it already down to a 45% charge, that might not be true.

    Incidentally, this is one of the main reasons why Brighthand doesn't publish full reviews of smartphones after only trying them out for a day or two. At that point, it's much to early to say what the battery life is going to be.
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  3. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    At the same time, it will almost certainly make you more productive. Although there are exceptions, most of time stopping to check your phone every time a message comes in is a huge time waster. Don't think it just takes a few seconds -- studies have shown that people are less productive for several minutes after being interrupted in the middle of a task.

    So save your battery and get more work done by reducing how often you check your messages.
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  4. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    All good tips! I think the complaints are a vocal minority.

    My average day:

    6ish hours of use
    15-17hrs of standby
    Down to around 20% by bedtime

    Uses include:
    Yammer, BeejiveGT, two gmail accounts set to fetch every 15 minutes, twitter, cnbc real-time with push enabled (1-6 alerts per day), 1-2 siri uses (setting a reminder, texting someone while in the car), 15-45 minutes of phone time, maybe 15-20 minutes of web browsing, and maybe 20 minutes of gameplay like Angry Birds, etc.

    All with BT on (and BT connected to my car each way on my 45 min commute), and wifi on (and connected when I am home but not at work), and most location services on (turned off for camera and twitter, for instance). Weather widget is on in notifications but stock ticker is off.

    On weekends, swap out camera use over phone and GT time, and I get similar to better battery life.

    And I only kill apps if they're being buggy or things seem a bit laggy (only happened a few times).

    This is with a launch-day Verizon 16gb 4S.
     
  5. Varjak

    Varjak Mobile Deity

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    I'm not an iPhone user; but I'm impressed that 30% brightness works for many/most people.

    Also, I'm a bit confused by the email settings. Why doesn't changing to polling every 15m or so reduce battery drain? I'd have thought that that would still be much more efficient than push e-mail. And why would the number of emails significantly impact the difference? Again, I'd think that establishing connection, checking for e-mail and then retrieving them would be the big drain. Unless the attachments or text are very large the individual size shouldn't matter much, should it? (I don't know for sure, just asking.)
     
  6. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    Let's take a look at what I said:
    The "push" message you get from the server can be a big savings or a big drain, depending on how many emails you regularly get.

    If you get 8 messages an hour and have Push email set up, that means that, on average, every 7 minutes you get an order from the server that tells your device to connect and download new messages. So your phone goes through this process 8 times an hour.

    With the other possibility, if you have your device set to check for new messages every 15 minutes, the phone goes through the process of connecting and checking for messages 4 times an hour whether you have any messages waiting or not. If you only get 1 message an hour you're wasting a lot of connections, but, on the other hand, if you get 8 messages an hour checking for messages every 15 mins. is a savings -- you are only connecting half as much as you would with Push.

    In an extreme example, if you get just 1 message every 6 hours, and have Push email set up, you have to connect just once in that time period, not 24 times.

    Like I said, picking your email settings depends heavily on how many messages you usually get.

    A Segue
    As I said in a recent editorial, it would be really nice if Apple let us choose different settings for different times of the day. I get a lot of urgent messages during work day, so I like to have Push email on. That stops at 8 pm though, and I'd like to reduce that setting to maybe one email check an hour. I can't do that with my iPhone, even though this was a standard feature of the Palm OS and Windows Mobile back in the day.
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  7. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    I seriously miss the old days when we could choose a Profile that took care of a number of settings all at once, and could be labeled Profile1 Normal, Profile2 Silent or Profile3 Outdoors, for example. That was something that my old Nokia phones handled very well with almost no effort. And they weren't even "smart". ;)
     
  8. headcronie

    headcronie Greyscale. Nuff Said. Super Moderator

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    Amen!! Drives me nuts that I can't schedule Android to shut off email sync when work is done. Yet, Windows Mobile effortlessly does this. I don't care about email that comes from a co-worker with insomnia at 2 in the morning. I'll deal with it when I get on the clock. But no... I get woken up at 2am, cuz push email just runs all the time. :(
     
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  9. Drillbit

    Drillbit Mobile Deity

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    Get Tasker for Android.

    ICS does have built in tasking abilities for mobile data. It is said that it even has a daily data limiter which cuts off when its reached.
     
  10. Drillbit

    Drillbit Mobile Deity

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    Polling is more efficient when your emails are much more numerous and frequent. There is probably a graph when the power curves for polling and pushing would meet, pushing would start ahead but at a certain point, it becomes equal and as the number goes higher, polling becomes more efficient.

    Pushing requires that a connection to the email server is made for every each and one notification. Its like getting a phone call from your grocer and you drive your car to buy one item. Then you drive back to the grocer to pick up items from each new shipment that arrives.

    Polling means you can pull down as many email as you want one with one connection. Its like going to the grocer at a scheduled time, then buy and take home as many items as you need.

    If you got 10 emails within an hour, push email would mean opening connections at least 10 times, once with each email. A 15 minute poll would mean opening connections only four times within that hour to get all 10 emails.

    But as you can see with this example, if the number of emails are less than four, pushing would be more efficient.

    Its just a simplistic example to illustrate a principle.
     

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