E-Book readers

Discussion in 'Android OS' started by weegie, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. weegie

    weegie Mobile Deity

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    My HTC Sensation has an ebook reader linked to Kobo store, trouble with Kobo is that the choice seems to be fairly limited for someone like me that really isn't into mainstream books.
    Google ebooks requires internet connection to use theirs which I'm not interested in, plus I'm don't want to purchase the reader software [unless it's free from the market] or ebooks from them.
    So....my requirements are...
    No Google purchases
    Must be locally stored [on the device]
    Large selection of History, Biographical, Technical books

    anybodies suggestions are appreciated.:)

    Just out of interest to my complete lack of knowledge re E-books, how many different formats are used, can readers display multiple formats etc
     
  2. Hook

    Hook Phone Killer ;-) Arrrrr...f

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    Well, most of the ebook stores are online, however you don't need to be online to read the books. I would think that would be true of Google books too, but I've never used it.

    Aldiko is a great ebook reader that you can get both free and puchased books for. Also the easiest to do sideloading from the SD card with.

    I also like Kindle, but have now switched to a kindle wifi instead of reading kindle books on my handheld, though I can do that too. Books are stored locally although they can also be archived on the web. Wifi is fine, don't need data.
     
  3. Mi An

    Mi An Nexus Refugee

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    The two major formats are epub and mobi. The 2 major DRM schemes are a larger barrier to universal reading. One is Amazon's system, used by Amazon. The second is adobe's system, used by most everyone else. Barnesandnoble started out using eReader's social DRM, but I can't say for sure that they still use it, they might have switched over to adobe.

    As uncertain as things are, I'm not likely to suggest any store other than Amazon or Barnes and Noble, but I don't particularly like Amazon's android readerware myself for lack of formatting options and perks. If you're willing to strip DRM (a legally gray area see this for more) and convert with calibre, you can use any reader, and something like Aldiko or Moon+ will allow you to fully customize your reading experience. Aldiko can read adobe DRM'd stuff w/o resorting to DRM removal, which is what Sony uses.
     
  4. weegie

    weegie Mobile Deity

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    Thanks guys, I will check out the information you've given me and come back
     
  5. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    I'm going to add another vote for Aldiko. In addition to being uber-customizable, they have built in storefronts for Feedbooks and a few other non-mainstream sources. May not be a perfect selection but worth trying...

    And if you're looking for mainstream-ish books but with more variety than Kobo, your best bet is Amazon followed by B&N, in which case Mi An's DRM stripping advice is going to be your best friend.

    IIRC, Amazon said they have almost 1 million for-pay ebooks-B&N, Kobo, and the others claim 2.5 million ebooks BUT there's at least 1.5 million in there that are free from Google Books, etc. Amazon probably has the highest non-free ratio, but I'd guess B&N to be a close second.
     
  6. weegie

    weegie Mobile Deity

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    I think I need to wait for a couple of years for the more unusual books to be converted to ebooks, I haven't had much luck searching the suggestions
     
  7. LaLongeCarabine

    LaLongeCarabine Mobile Deity

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    I have three, e-reader, Barns & Noble, and Kindle.
    They all work the same with a few slight differences. Mostly I use Kindle now, due to a favorite author no longer sells books for e-reader.
     
  8. Hook

    Hook Phone Killer ;-) Arrrrr...f

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    I suspect the kind of stuff you are looking for, if it is available, is available in pdf. If so, I'm not sure how rewarding it's going to be to deal with them on a small screen.

    A very curious thing has happened to me since getting my Kindle Wifi for a Father's Day present. I can't even read regular books on my Nexus One anymore, even though it is convenient because my Nexus One is always with me and my Kindle isn't. The Kindle ebook reader is just such a natural experience-- no UI in the way, just me and the words, great contrast, very light to hold. I almost am incapable of putting up with any other way of reading.

    Frankly, my wife and son got me the present despite my resistance. "Why do I need another device, I can read on my phone."

    Wow. Was I surprised.
     
  9. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    I use the Kindle app, and what I like best about it is it runs on both my smartphone and my tablet.

    I prefer to read on the Galaxy Tab, but (as H said) you don't always have your tablet with you. So if I'm stuck in a queue somewhere I can pull out my phone, open the Kindle app, and start reading right where I left off on the larger device. When I get home again, when I go to the Kindle app on the tablet, I'm right where I left off on the phone.
    -
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 19, 2015
  10. Stryker

    Stryker Mobile Deity

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    Kindle and Aldiko. Just recently tried Aldiko, and I like it...
     
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