Creationism vs. Evolution...should both be taught?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by dogbarber, Oct 2, 2006.

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Intelligent Design vs. Evolution

  1. Evolution should be taught exclusively

    17 vote(s)
    54.8%
  2. I.D. should be taught side by side with Evolution

    14 vote(s)
    45.2%
Multiple votes are allowed.
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  1. r0k

    r0k Dazed

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    another quote...

     
  2. dogbarber

    dogbarber No one in particular...

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    Heard about this on one of my podcasts....interesting. :)


    Brights and Dims
    Paul Geisert and Mynga Futrell have formed an organization of people known as Brights, who have the following characteristics:

    A Bright is a person who has a naturalistic worldview.
    A Bright's worldview is free of supernatural and mystical elements.
    The ethics and actions of a Bright are based on a naturalistic worldview.

    You can proclaim yourself a Bright by signing up at Geisert and Futrell's web site. Among those who have done so are

    Biologist Richard Dawkins
    Philosopher Daniel Dennett
    Magician James Randi
    Nobel laureate Richard Roberts
    Helen and Edwin Kagin, founders of Camp Quest, a summer camp for the children of atheists

    The rest of us mental midgets, who don't subscribe to the Bright creed, are presumably Dims, or worse. Dawkins even charges that those who give their children a religious upbringing are guilty of child abuse.
    I'd guess that many of those who call themselves Brights are employed in scientific and technical professions. In my twenty years in the computer business, I've met few who admit to being Christians, but many who loudly trumpet their atheism. It's refreshing to happen across computer scientists who aren't afraid to confess their faith, such as:

    Frederick Brooks, author of The Mythical Man-Month: Essays on Software Engineering, who became a Christian at age 31 and is faculty advisor of a chapter of the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship.
    Larry Wall, creator of the Perl programming language, who is an evangelical Christian and web master of his church's web site.
    Donald Knuth, author of the monumental Art of Computer Programming, who is a Lutheran and church organist.
    But none of these luminaries qualifies as a Bright, I suppose.

    One of my favorites Dims is the composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). A large portion of his oeuvre consists of religious cantatas, performed in his lifetime as part of the Lutheran liturgy, in which of course a Bright would never participate. Bach was so far from holding a "naturalistic worldview" that even in his secular works he insisted on writing such comments as JJ (Jesu juva = Jesus, help me), SDG (soli Deo gloria = to God alone be the glory) and INJ (in nomine Jesu = in the name of Jesus) in the margins. Mystical, supernatural claptrap, the Brights would say.

    A hallmark of Christianity is that you don't need a high IQ to join. You don't need to be a Nobel laureate, or a professor at a famous university. It would be supremely unfair if you did, and it might even be a disadvantage if you do, since "God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty" (1 Corinthians 1:27). There's no age requirement. You can start being a Christian when you're a child, and a childlike demeanor is even recommended to adults:
    "Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 18:3).
     
  3. dogbarber

    dogbarber No one in particular...

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    LAST CAAALLL!!! Closing time!.....Bar's closed!!!................good night everyone. :)
     
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