Can You Really Work from a Smartphone with Microsoft Office Mobile? Discussion

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by Sarah White, Apr 15, 2014.

  1. Sarah White

    Sarah White Mobile Enthusiast

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  2. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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    You've mentioned that in Excel, the only included formula-function is Auto Sum -- does the mobile version for either platform at least properly display the results of formulas from a spreadsheet created on a full PC/Mac? for example, something I use often utilizes conditional formatting, to underline a specific value, which changes on a daily basis. Granted, I've not looked at all the Android spreadsheets available, but the full versions of Documents to Go and QuickOffice Pro (pre-Google acquisition) do not show any of this conditional formatting, only Planmaker Mobile works as I need it to (Planmaker Mobile also has a wide array of built-in formula-functions).
     
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  3. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    Over the years I have regularly worked with Word documents on a range of smartphones, but sitting down and creating one from scratch isn't something that's been common.

    Most often, I am using one for reference; someone sends me a file and I read it to get information I need to do my job.

    I also edit other people's documents. Someone sends me a Word doc and I make a few changes and then send it back. This is really where the phone version of Office is ideal. Being able to read something over and make a few tweaks wherever and whenever I need to, can be a tremendous convenience.

    But this doesn't mean I've never done any real writing on a phone. Writing a few hundred words on a 3.5-inch screen isn't something I'd recommend anyone make a habit of, but it is possible and sometimes necessary.
     
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  4. RickAgresta

    RickAgresta Peanut, leader of the Peanutty Forces

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  5. Hook

    Hook Phone Killer ;-) Arrrrr...f

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    Yes, my experience is similar to Ed's. I really like creating and editing docs on my Nexus 7 with the Lenovo BT keyboard an, yes, the Lenovo BT keyboard could be used with my Nexus 5, but it still isn't that great an experience on a 5" screen. It wasn't that great on my TX. Mostly I use a handheld to refer to documents and maybe make a few notations for later. The N5 and N7 make a great combo, tho. I can write on the N7 with the keyboard, while using the phone to check notes, do a quick internet search for research or check a different document to look up something I said before all without leaving what I'm working with on the tablet.

    In either case, however, Microsoft Office for Android just isn't feature rich enough. Softmaker Office (Text Maker (forum won't let me properly run those two words together) and Planmaker) is so much better and feature-rich. Not free, of course.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
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  6. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    Here's hoping the wait for Microsoft Office for Android isn't too long, as should help tablet users like you a great deal.
     
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  7. Sarah White

    Sarah White Mobile Enthusiast

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    The app currently only has a few key features, but I hope Microsoft has plans to expand the available functions with future updates. I think part of the reason Microsoft has only introduced basic functions at this point is because of the company's Office 365 subscription service. It seems Microsoft is hoping that interest in the mobile app will drive users to the more feature-rich iPad and Android apps, or even into the arms of a full Office 365 subscription.

    As of right now, it's definitely easier to open and edit documents in the app that were originally created on a notebook or desktop, rather than drafting one from scratch. This is especially true for Excel users that need to create extensive spreadsheets with charts, graphs, and complicated formulas. From testing, it seems that formulas will translate as data, but will remain static. Same goes for complicated graphs and charts. Microsoft is a bit vague on their site as to what users can except to accomplish with each app, but we found that most of the basic functions exist in the Office Mobile app. However, it's really going to depend on a user's specific needs and usage. PowerPoint users will be disappointed if their needs extend beyond simply opening a presentation and editing the text. Personally, I got the most use out of Word, but that may be the nature of my job, which relies heavily on Microsoft Word.
     
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