Can Nokia gets its magic back with Lumia 920?

Discussion in 'Other Device Manufacturers' started by webbjames, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. Grant Hatchimonji

    Grant Hatchimonji Brighthand Site Editor

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    Hmm...so do you mean syncing other elements with desktop Outlook aside from just the inbox? Because yes, the Outlook sync on WP does that natively as well. So for example, Outlook calendar entries and tasks (and contacts) are automatically synced up to my phone now that I've connected it to my Outlook account. Now, a text reminder of that Outlook calendar entry automatically shows up on my lock screen the day of the entry, and I'll also receive a notification buzz/beep 15 minutes prior to the event. Also, if I make any changes to my desktop Outlook calendar, they will be reflected on my phone (and vice versa). Is that the sort of syncing you're referring to?

    EDIT: In case it wasn't implied, no part of this process involves plugging your phone into your computer, it's all handled automatically after you punch in your Outlook account info that one time. I feel the need to include this disclaimer because a lot of the Zune syncing nonsense often requires you to plug your phone into your computer.
     
  2. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Aesthetic differences and live-tile functionality aside, WP is actually a LOT like iOS. There's no "file explorer" or anything. It's a very locked down walled-garden ecosystem. There's not a lot of customization. But the native apps are really, really user-friendly, and it runs flawlessly without lag or hiccups. Third-party software offered through the store is generally decent quality and almost invariably matches the aesthetic of the rest of the OS.

    It's not an OS for programmers or hackers. Like iOS, it's an OS meant for laypeople, so the emphasis is on stability, refinement, and user-friendliness, not ultimate malleability in the hands of an expert.

    The advantages it offers over iOS are (1) hardware choice from multiple OEMs, and (2) while both Apple and Microsoft are playing up the greater ecosystem across multiple devices, most of us have Windows PCs and many have Xbox 360s, whereas OSX machines are rare and Google TV is extremely rare. Obviously iOS's advantages are developer loyalty (iOS is priority #1 for many app developers) and widespread consumer use of iTunes as opposed to Zune (which is well-loved by Pass-holders but still a drop in the bucket compared to iTunes).
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2012
  3. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    Actually, I wasn't talking Inbox at al. Email is trivial on any platform. However, I still can't tell if you are talking Calendar, contacts, notes from Outlook on the desktop or from an Exchange account. I don't have the latter and have no interest in it. If you are talking desktop, what is the means by which is synchronizes?
     
  4. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    You keep pushing this programmer and hacker characterization for Android. I'm neither. I also don't use Linux. I use Windows, although it is XP. But I also don't care very much about media, social or otherwise. I care about having a device in my pocket which I can use to get work done. I know I can do it with either Android or iOS although Android offers me more options for doing some things, such as managing files.

    I don't know how well I can do the things I want to do with WP.
     
  5. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Maybe "programmer" or "hacker" isn't the right word, but how would you characterize someone who doesn't flinch at rooting a device and installing a custom ROM such as Cyanogenmod? Technophile? Experienced tech user? "Root-er"? Regardless, I personally wouldn't classify anyone who feels comfortable rooting a device and installing and setting up a custom ROM as "mainstream."

    Whether WP works for you to "get work done" depends on your work. For me, work on my phone = email and lots of it. And my phone does that wonderfully. The email interface is really pleasant and I have three email accounts linked to it.

    To try to answer your questions:

    * "Does WP8 have a file system." I'll answer for WP7 as WP8 hasn't been formally unveiled yet. Like I said, no manual file manager. It sorts and organizes files for you, and you can't override that.

    * "What are the limitations to the Office apps?" They can display documents from Office 2003 but need newer file versions (docx, not doc) to actually edit it. OneNote works great. Word is a very rudimentary version, with highly limited formatting options. It's really meant for reviewing Word and Excel documents, not creating them, and it does a very good job with that in most cases. Same with Excel. I expect more features for WP8, but that hasn't been unveiled yet.

    * "Can it sync in some manner with Outlook?" The "outlook sync" in WP7 is for Exchange and Office 365, not for the Outlook PC software that's part of the MS Office suite. I believe that WP8 and Office 15 will play nicer together, but we won't know for sure until both are officially unveiled. I sync contacts and calendars through my gmail and hotmail accounts, and that works flawlessly.

    * "What apps are available for it particularly for productivity?" Over a hundred thousand apps are available. This depends a lot on what you are looking for in terms of "productivity" apps. If you want to know if a certain app is available, I'll look for you, but I can't list all productivity apps in the Windows Marketplace.
     
  6. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    Frankly, it is easy to do on Android and gives me more control, but is not an ability I require. Further, I only do it where the pr0cedure is little more adventurous than installing a program and changing settings. Hence, no flashing ROMs on my Galaxy Player-- they are all science projects so far. I'm pretty timid with this stuff and wouldn't do it if it weren't easy.

    Thanks, this information is helpful. :)
     
  7. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    I tried and failed to root my Kindle Fire. I know people who say that sewing their own clothes is easy, replacing the suspension on their sport compact car is easy, and rooting their mobile devices is easy...I've never found any to be easy for me. Maybe I'm just dumb and these things are easy for everyone else.

    Let me know if you have any other questions I can answer about Windows Phone. Always happy to.
     
  8. weegie

    weegie Mobile Deity

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    That's me, if it has tiles, I won't be using it, and I'm very heavily invested in Windows with expensive MCAD software among the usual Office etc....they want to play hardball with lack of choice and configuration, I will play hardball with my wallet.Life without Windows is easily doable, Steve Ballmer would do well to remember this rather than just saying stuff the customers, they will get used to it.

    What convinces you that an interface that's proved unpopular with WP would become popular on PC's where it's even more out of place?
     
  9. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    One of the things I find simultaneously amusing and sad is that MS cannot seem to get mobile Office right. It should be the premiere mobile Office app, exclusively on their platform,such that, if you use Office, you should want to check out their platform first as a mobile solution. There is no excuse for third parties to be able to handle Office Doc editing better than MS. Same with Outlook PIM syncing-- it should be a no-brainer. This same lack of capability is what made me choose Palm over Pocket PC years ago. Looks like nothing much has changed.
     
  10. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    How often do you sit there with the start menu open in Windows 7? A few seconds every hour when you hit the start key and type the first few letters of a program you want to enter? Because so long as you're using a keyboard and mouse and running desktop applications, that's how often you'll see tiles in Windows 8.

    Windows Phone 7 proved unpopular, but that doesn't mean people rejected it BECAUSE of its tiles. To the contrary, it was hamstrung by low-res screens, single-core processors, [edit]a serious lack of app selection that's recently been remedied (over 100,000 apps available)[/edit], and a lack of serious OEM and carrier support, both of whom were playing conservatively and sticking with the established players (Android and iOS). Almost every time I've walked into a cell phone store to try to casually shop for new hardware, the salespeople have tried to steer me away from WP and onto Android or iOS. If I wasn't already informed, I'd go along with that--and that seriously hurts WP7 sales. With hardware that actually can compete with iOS and Android devices and serious carrier support for WP8, I think you're going to see very different sales results.

    If people were averse to the tiles themselves and not those other issues, you'd have expected Xbox 360 sales to plummet and everyone to jump ship to the PS3 after the 360 went Metro. They didn't; the 360 still dominates US sales.
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2012

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