Can Nokia gets its magic back with Lumia 920?

Discussion in 'Other Device Manufacturers' started by webbjames, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. webbjames

    webbjames Mobile Enthusiast

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    Nokia isn't staying away from the smartphone battle and will enter the fray with Apple's iPhone 5 and Samsung's Galaxy S3 with the Lumia 920.

    It is said The Lumia 920 could have a release date as early as Oct. 21. But will you buy buy it at that time? It is a long time to wait. Don't you think so?
     
  2. Grant Hatchimonji

    Grant Hatchimonji Brighthand Site Editor

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    The timing shouldn't really be the point of concern for Nokia. Let's say Oct. 21 is the release date: while it's true that by the time the Lumia 920 is released the Galaxy S III will be roughly 4 months old, the iPhone 5 will only have been out for about a month. It will be the last out of the gate, sure, but it's the best they can do while they wait for Microsoft to wrap things up and release Windows Phone 8.

    So to address your question of whether or not Nokia can "get its magic back" with its new flagship phone, I'd have to say that the real concern for Nokia is the need to create converts to WP8. Objectively speaking, the Windows Phone platform is simply not very popular; it has, far and away, the least amount of market share out of iOS, Android, and WP (I'm leaving BB out of this for now since RIM's fate is in limbo).

    But peoples' indifference (or, in some cases, disdain) for Windows Phone is unlikely to be swayed by WP8 which, at least on the surface, does not appear to be a drastic change from WP7. Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of new features in WP8 that I think are attractive, I just don't think they're readily apparent to someone who hasn't made a concerted effort to learn more about/spend time with the OS. That's why I think Nokia needs to play up some of these new factors, especially since people who hate the Metro UI are going to see screenshots and think, "Ew, tiles. Count me out," and simply write it off. Yes, there will always be some people who despise Metro so much that no amount of other features will convince them to adopt an OS that still uses that UI, but I do believe that some users can be won over.

    The hardware of the Lumia 920 (e.g. the exceptional camera, PureView imaging technology, NFC) is great, but I'm not sure it's enough to convince people who dislike the OS to abandon their convictions with regards to WP8 just to buy a quality handset. People need to be sold on WP8, too. They need to be convinced that WP8 is just as attractive as the phone itself if Nokia wants to get back into the game with the Lumia 920, and rightfully so; you can't expect people to buy a phone that runs an OS that they either know nothing about or think they have every right to hate.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2012
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  3. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    I am convinced that the release of Windows 8 is going to do great things for Windows Phone 8, and Nokia by extension.

    As it stands now, the tiles interface used by Windows Phone is unfamiliar to many phone buyers, as they are more accustomed to the icon-driven interface of other devices (iOS, Android, etc.). Once Windows 8 is released, however, they will have a computer that uses the same tiles-based interface -- formerly known as Metro. Once people become familiar with this interface on their PC, they will start wanting a phone that works the same way.
     
  4. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Carriers are showing a major interest in WP8 whereas they really didn't with WP7 (AT&T excepted, to a limited degree at the very end with the Lumia 900). Leaks have shown that Verizon will carry all three WP8 flagships (with WP7, they carried a single second-tier WP7 device). T-Mobile has put up a page allowing people to pre-order the HTC 8X. Etc. If carriers are excited, that means they think people will buy them.

    I do think WP8 will succeed where WP7 didn't. First, it no longer lags behind on hardware, because WP8 supports high-res screens and multi-core processors (WP7 didn't). Second, Microsoft is pushing the connected ecosystem much better this time thanks to Windows 8--it looks more similar, and works better, with both modern Windows PCs and Xbox 360s.

    I am convinced that the people who have that strong negative aversion to the Metro aesthetic (I refuse to quit using that word; Metro AG can sue me if they want) are a vocal but relatively small percentage of people who are ultimately loyal to rooted Android devices anyway (and in some cases, Linux computers). WP7 didn't succeed with the mainstream, not because people hate the aesthetic (I don't think mainstream folks are averse to it at all), but because of WP7's severe hardware limitations, its small app store (which has grown substantially since then), and a lack of promotion by both carriers and OEMs (the Lumia 900 push was too little too late, particularly given the hardware limitations, and it's the only WP7 marketing I ever saw).
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2012
  5. webbjames

    webbjames Mobile Enthusiast

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    Thanks very much for sharing your opinion. In summary,whether Nokia can gets its magic back, not only depend on the Phone itself, but also the Windows phone 8 system. We will see in the future.
     
  6. webbjames

    webbjames Mobile Enthusiast

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    I hope this will happened in the near future. As a Nokia fan, I like Nokia very much, and the camera on the phone is always powerful. I hope the windows phone 8 can bring a life to Nokia.
     
  7. webbjames

    webbjames Mobile Enthusiast

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    Someone like the Android while other like the iPhone. I believe there must have someone like the Windows phone 8.
     
  8. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    I think this is key. I really dislike the tile interface, and yet that is all anyone seems to want to show me. I really have no idea how WP8 (or 7, for that matter) actually works under the hood and I'm not likely to be motivated to go hang out at a WP forum to find out. Does WP8 have a file system. What are the limitations to the Office apps? Can it sync in some manner with Outlook? What apps are available for it particularly for productivity? Frankly, even BH's review of Mango seems sparse on these kinds of details whereas I know these details for both Android and iOS. If someone convinced me there was something going on with WP that was worth having to swipe the tiles out of the way each time, I'd look at it.
     
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  9. Grant Hatchimonji

    Grant Hatchimonji Brighthand Site Editor

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    I think that's a fair point; the tiles are played up so heavily because it's probably the most unique facet of the operating system, but it's a mistake to talk about that and only that, especially if your audience isn't feeling the aesthetic.

    As far as what's going on under the hood with the OS, my position has always been this: The benefits of Windows Phone depend entirely on how deeply Microsoft's "ecosystem" is engrained in your lifestyle, because the integration with all of the other software is outstanding. That's why I personally love it, but I can recognize that it's not for everybody. As someone who uses Xbox/Windows Live, Zune, Office, Outlook, and even Bing (I actually despise Bing, but I use it for the rewards points) on a frequent basis, Windows Phone is the ideal OS for me because mobile versions of all of those things are baked right in. In a way, it's the same reason iPhones are perfect for Mac users.

    But for someone who isn't heavily invested in Microsoft's platforms/software, I can recognize that there are much better options out there for them, namely Android. It's an option that provides a much stronger app selection (to answer your question about productivity apps on WP, there aren't many...at least not quality ones), that is available on a greater variety of phones per carrier, and that, until now with Windows Phone 8, was available on phones that weren't locked down by mediocre hardware restrictions (only single-core processors, no expandable memory, etc.).

    To answer the other couple of questions you posed, if by "file system" you mean directory, no WP does not have that (at least not built-in...maybe there's an app for it, but I've never bothered to look).

    The Office integration actually has only a few limitations, and they're essentially ones that you can't get away from when dealing with that type of a software suite on a smartphone. I'm referencing limitations like the discomfort of typing out full-length Word documents on your phone, simply because that's a pain in the ass with a virtual keyboard (but you can do it if you want). Along those same lines, while you can view or edit PP files on your phone, you can't create them, since that's just not particularly feasible. But other than that, you can create and edit Word, Excel, and OneNote files (if you use other, more obscure Office programs besides Word, Excel, OneNote, and PP, you won't find them here) and share them both with yourself and others pretty easily. WP gives you a few options to choose from that are built into the Office suite: obviously you can email your files, but you can also store them locally on your phone or their cloud services, which include Office 365, SharePoint, and SkyDrive, all of which you can access from other devices including desktops. I'd say there is maybe a little more to the whole mobile Office suite, but that's it in a nutshell, to address your question.

    And yes, it can sync with Outlook extremely easily; in fact, that's one of its greatest strengths with regards to productivity. I was very impressed by how easily I was able to sync my phone with my work (Outlook) email account. WP has a section in the settings for adding as many email accounts as you want, and you can specifically select "Outlook" and all you need to do is punch in your username, password, and domain. In some cases, you may need to type in your server too, but other than that it's very simple. It took me less than 3 minutes to have my whole inbox on my phone.


    And while I'm here...

    An excellent point, Ed. I hadn't really considered that.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2012
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  10. Hook

    Hook Professional Daydreamer

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    From your description,I am guessing you are actually referring to syncing with a Microsoft Exchange account. I am referring to Desktop Outlook. I believe Companion Link will do it as it does on Android, but I was curious if WP does natively, though I suspect it would only do it through OFFICE360 or some other cloud-based layer.

    However, thanks for the information. It was very helpful, but I hope when WP8, BH will do a very in-depth review of the OS, including for those of us who don't have X-box, don't use Zune and wouldn't touch Bing with a 10 foot pole. ;-)

    I'm not as convinced tiles will survive on the desktop. I think there will be a plethora of third party launcher solutions and Win8 may very well be the next Vista.
     
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