Browser infiltrators - help

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Streaky, Feb 7, 2008.

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  1. Konrad Pierce

    Konrad Pierce Village Idiot 2.0

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    (sigh)

    12 rep hits for this already ... and two thirds of 'em green ...
     
  2. cassidy0423

    cassidy0423 Bad Robot

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    sorry:eek:

    Force of habit :D


    cassi
     
  3. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    I'm getting some boot error, pxe-e61.
     
  4. palmgeek5394

    palmgeek5394 Nokia N800 + HTC Wizard

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    That sucks. Unfortunately, I have no idea how to fix boot errors. :( Perhaps Konrad will chime in.
     
  5. Dick Tracy

    Dick Tracy Detective/Moderator

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    My search on this error indicates your computer tried to boot from network.
     
  6. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    It's sometimes a bios error, sometimes a physical connection problem. I was doing virus scans, but also connected my pc to a router and created a little network w/my old pc. I'm wondering if static discharge is to blame.

    As soon as the kids are in bed, I'll pour some scotch and tackle it.
     
  7. Konrad Pierce

    Konrad Pierce Village Idiot 2.0

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    Boot error PXE-E61 = "Media Test Failure"

    This is (supposed to mean) a problem within your BIOS settings or drive/media hardware.
    • Check the cables on all your drives. All the pins should be properly connected; it's quite easy to reverse non-keyed connectors or misalign the connectors, it's also common for them to occassionally pull loose from the drives. It may be necessary to swap in good cables (<$5), especially if there's any apparent kinks or damage on the existing ones. A very common cause of this problem is a IDE/SCSI cable being improperly connected on a hard-to-reach CD/DVD drive in the upper/front corner of the PC case. Recheck the connections on the motherboard as well, of course. Don't exceed the recommended maximum lengths for each data cable type, try to make sure there's no sharp bends or pinches in these cables, and try not to have them criss-cross close to each other or any active power-supply connectors. It also never hurts to replace older 40-pin IDEs with newer 80-pin "grounded" cables when possible.
    • Check the master/slave pins on all your drives. Each IDE channel that's in use can accept 1 Master and 1 Slave; incorrect configuration is a common cause of media problems. This is even more crucial with SCSI devices - make sure any SCSI-chained devices have properly configured ID pinouts and are all properly terminated.
    • The drives may not be getting sufficient power. Check that each drive has a working power connector attached. (If you don't want to get into measuring voltages and such then just swap suspect power supply connectors onto the motherboard for quick testing.) This can be a real problem if your power supply is a bit gutless, most especially during initial system power up when everything's whirring and spinning up at full power drain ... some BIOS setups will allow you to stagger drive bootup activity with a short time delay, which can help a lot on a borderline system. Otherwise you'll have to choose between using fewer power-sucking devices or buying yourself a more manly PSU.
    • Your PC could be attempting to boot from a LAN. This can be fixed by simply disabling the appropriate option/s in the BIOS, and/or by changing the order in which the PC searches for boot drives at power up.
    • You might even have a bad drive controller. Somehow the circuitry in one of your drives has failed - it can only be fixed (and your data can only be recovered) by replacing the entire drive-mounted logic module with one from an identical unit, which usually costs more than a brand new hard drive. Not a very common problem (usually the motors or heads fail first) but it has been known to happen.
    • It's not a bad idea to check your motherboard's NVRAM/CMOS battery (typically a CR2032 coin cell, less than a $1) when things like this start to happen a lot.
     
  8. jigwashere

    jigwashere Mobile Deity

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    I'm completely dumbfounded. I sent my drive to Ontrack for data recovery. Here's the response:

     
  9. lelisa13p

    lelisa13p Your Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Oh, my. :(
     
  10. Hook

    Hook Caught Watching Prawn

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    Ouch. I'm so sorry, Jig-- though that is rather impressive. :eek:
     
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