Barnes & Noble Seeing Heavy Demand for Nook E-Book Reader

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by Ed Hardy, Nov 8, 2009.

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  1. Ed Hardy

    Ed Hardy TabletPCReview Editor Staff Member

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    When Barnes & Noble unveiled its electronic book reader last month,it said the Nook was scheduled for a late November release. The company is apparently going to make that deadline -- just barely --but many of those who want this accessory are going to have to wait until well into December to get it.

    [​IMG]Those who have already pre-ordered the Nook on this retailer's websitehave been told their package will be shipped on Nov. 30. However, those placing pre-orders now are bring told that they won't get it until until the second week in December.

    Many potential customers are delaying putting in an order until they see this e-book reader in person. Barnes & Noble stores are reportedly going to have demonstration units on the last day of this month, but no units to sell. At this point, it's not clear if B&N stores will have more than demo units this year; all sales may have to happen on the Web.

    Those who would like to give the Nook as a Christmas present will apparently have to seriously consider buying it unseen, as devices pre-ordered next monthmight not ship until too late.

    The costis $260, and pre-orders can be placed now on B&N's website.

    An Overview of the Barnes & Noble Nook
    The Nookwill be a direct competitor to Amazon.com's Kindle. It will differentiate itself by allowing users to lend books and connect toWi-Fi networks.

    [​IMG]This devicewill have 6-inch, grayscale E-Ink screen for displaying the contents of books, newspapers, and magazines, and below that will be a smaller color touchscreen that will be used as a keyboard and to perform other actions.

    Users will be able to purchase and download e-books directly on the Nook, either over a Wi-Fi connection or over AT&T's 3G network. Those who want to access hotspots in B&N stores will be able to do so for free.

    E-books will be in eReader, the open ePub standard,or Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format, and users will be able to move files onto this reader -- they don't have to come from B&N.

    This devicewill have 2 GB of internal storage -- that's room for about 1,500 books -- plus it will have a microSD card slot for additional capacity.

    The most unusual feature of the Nook will be the ability to "lend" books; users will be able to loan a text to one oftheir friends for up to 14 days for no charge. The receiver must have either a Nook or a compatible device -- iPhone, BlackBerry, Palm, PC, etc. -- with the free B&N eReader software installed.

    Physically, the Nook is going to be 7.7 inches by 4.9 inches by 0.5 inches (196 mm by 126 mm by 13 mm). It will weigh 11.2 ounces (317 g).

    Source: Barnes & Noble Book Clubs Forum

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    Sony Unveils Two New E-Book Readers

     
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  2. Antoine Wright

    Antoine Wright Neighborhood Mobilist Super Moderator

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    I can imagine the demand. I know that I'm looking at the Nook as it *seems* a more open alternative to the Kindle. I'm still quite miffed at the whole shebang behind ebook formats across these devices though, and that gives me the most pause with these units. Thankfully, the Nook seems to be in the class of supporting almost all of the formats.
     
  3. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Would the Nook or similar device be good for someone with visual impairments? My father-in-law has macular degeneration and need large print and very good lighting to read. The device would also have to be extremely simple to use. He's nearly 90 and has some dimentia.
     
  4. ewl88

    ewl88 Mobile Enthusiast

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    Most ebooks with E-ink technology (which both Nook and kindle employ) can increase font size. Kindle's has 7 preset sizes. I think the largest is around 18 point (my guess). I already have kindle 2 but I'm glad that the Nook exists. Maybe amazon will open up the kindle more to different formats as well make it easier to share or view pdfs, word. (current system is a bit kludgy)
     
  5. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    It depends on the actual degeneration of the eye(s). My grandad (91) also has macular degeneration and he needs huge fonts to read, even when using a magnifying lens. But, with a bit of practice, he manages to use a cellphone, and he's learning to use the MS Messenger :)eek:). I taught him to use a magnifying app in Windows, but however he still needs the magnifying lens, he manages to read the news straight from the screen.

    The Kindle is getting a lot of attention, but this Nook device, allowing the legacy eBook format, and having WiFi, seems more open to options.
     
  6. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    There are many factors behind this fragmentation...keep in mind in ebook world, more so than with music, content is king. Hardware is secondary to book sales. That's why the Kindle only really supports Amazon books, and why any non-BN books on the nook have to be sideloaded.

    These devices exist as conduits to books, not as open ended players (like, say, the iPod)...at least not yet. At some point there may be, but the publishing industry is going to be an obstacle.

    Interestingly, out of all of these companies manufacturing eBook readers, once again Sony is the loser...poor Sony.
     
  7. hal

    hal itchy and cold feet hal

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    Oh, yeah, there is some Sony Reader around... Well, I reckon the reason why Sony is again a minor player, is because of its lack of a suitable online marketplace; however a state-of-the-art company, Sony has not evolved into the newer trends, they need a marketplace, badly, and it's not quite a trend that surfaced yesterday, it's been on for years (or, does Sony have a marketplace of their own? :confused:). Behind the other ones, there's a reputed and big marketplace. Amazon is a books middleman, and it's a new thing actually that it's playing on the editorial side. But B&N is an old and reputed house, which BTW now happens to own FictionWise and the eReader, but had it not, I bet they would've searched another similar resource, or even created it, just like Amazon did with the Kindle.

    Haha, my old ebooks in eReader will last throughout years to come.
     
  8. Magellan

    Magellan Moderator of Ill repute Super Moderator

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    You would think Sony could nail down an on-line ebook marketplace. The PSN network on my PSP offers games, movies to buy and rent, and a ton of other content and it is easy to browse and purchase. I guess the big difference is they have control of all of the content as opposed to ebooks which would need to be licensed from others.
     
  9. questionfear

    questionfear Google'd.

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    Sony has an eBook marketplace. It just sucks badly compared to BN and Amazon for two reasons:

    1) Pricing. They consistently come in more expensive than Amazon, and around the same price as BN (for now). But BN has a lot of exposure and $$, and it's far easier to get BN gift cards than Sony Connect gift cards or whatever it is you need for their store.

    2) The reason the Kindle was so successful, and the reason the nook is shaping up to be a success, is because no one wants to be tethered to their PC to get a book. Wireless downloading and purchasing of books has been huge in the eBook world, mainly because it helps remove the geeky extra step of having yet another sync cable to track and software to use...consumers want to read their books, not spend 25 minutes troubleshooting a stubborn USB port. Add too many obstacles and no one is going to spend $300 to spend even more on books. Sony makes it too damn hard, and their attempt at a wireless version is probably too little, too late since BN and Amazon have captured so much mindshare.

    Sony pioneered dedicated e-ink readers, but they just don't get how to cater to non-tech mainstream audiences with them. They should have rushed out a reader with wifi the second the Kindle came out. Waiting probably killed them.
     
  10. Hook

    Hook Phone Killer ;-) Arrrrr...f

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    I know how Sony could create a nice little niche... eManga. ;)
     
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