600MHz, 800MHz, 1GHz, what do I need?

Discussion in 'Smartphones' started by Rambisco, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    I'm totally new to the whole android phones shopping, and I was wondering what speed I really need. Currently I own an iPod 4th gen, and its speed is ideal. I have a limited budget, so all those insane 1.5GHz dual-cores are out of my price range. And also battery life is one of my main concerns, do most androids handle 2 hours of browsing web angry birds and stuff easily, or is battery life comparable to the iPhone 4 hard to find?
     
  2. weegie

    weegie Mobile Deity

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    Things like the Desire HD [Inspire 4G], incredible S, Galaxy S [1 Ghz single core models] are becoming pretty good buys these days, still easily fast enough for 99.9% of users and have great features, plus latish versions of the OS.
    I've had two desire HD's, have quite a few family members with iPhone 4's and the battery life and speed is pretty comparable, I can't vouch for battery life being data connected 100% of the time and having widgets and social networking stuff updating all the time, because I don't use it except for when I turn it on to specifically browse or get email/maps, but neither are the iPhones I've compared to which use the same network.
    My dual core sensation has better battery life [than the HD] despite only having a marginally bigger battery, it's not really any faster though either.
    Galaxy SII dual core is better as well, but has quite a bit bigger battery.

    From what I've seen, Androids bad battery life is myth as long as you aren't some auto updating social network freak who loves animated wallpapers and using maximum brightness instead of auto, there's many options to extend battery life, screen brightness and poor/dropping phone signal are the two biggest power suckers I've found, so make sure you get something with good coverage where you going to use it.

    It would probably help to state where you are, what carrier you plan on using to get more specific recommendations, especially as the majority of members here are in the US
     
  3. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    Thank you. You cleared up alot for me. I was just wondering what kind of speed you need to run the OS smoothly, browse the web decently fast, and be able to play games like nova and asphalt. And as for my carrier, well, I can't afford an 80 dollar a month verizon or AT&T plan, so I'm sticking with the cheaper less reliable carriers, cricket and metropcs. Metro sounds a little too good to be true and I was also hoping for some feedback on them. But I have 120 maybe 200 later to spend on a phone, and the ones in my price range have the processors I listed. I just want one I'll be happy with that doesn't lag.
     
  4. Hook

    Hook Naked and Unbroken

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    While I don't specifically know MetroPCS, I don't have any reason to be suspicious of them. MetroPCS, Cricket, PagePlus and many others are examples of Mobile Virtual Network Operators or MVNOs. They essentially lease networks from the big carriers and are able to offer low-cost package deals. Cricket, for instance, runs on Sprint. Where they usually cut costs is on customer service and they don't tend to offer high end phones. So, if you need much help, they may be frustrating, but the deals are real. Just make sure the network they are using is one that has coverage in your area.

    Also, if you are not a heavy consumer of voice text and data and rely heavily on wifi, and you have good AT&T coverage, you might also look at some of the information in this thread. Start with the latest update. The MVNOs will work better if you use a lot of voice, text and data, but it is just another option.

    Gophone plans

    I would say, if you can, go for 1Ghz as that will handle anything you want to do and probably have better screen quality.
     
  5. jigwashere

    jigwashere Life is a circus!

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    Another thing to consider is that with most (if not all) decent Android phones, you can get a second battery to carry around and swap out when one dies. That might be a benefit over the iPhone.
     
  6. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    Oh, thanks. The second battery is a plus. I use about ~1.5GB a month, but the lowest AT&T plan can't beat metro's 40 dollar unlimited talk text and web. I just want a lowish costing phone that's as fast as my iPod (or faster) that runs android smoothly, has iPhone 4 like battery life, and is on a cheap costing carrier. And also, wifi and 4g are pluses.
     
  7. Hook

    Hook Naked and Unbroken

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    Yes, I figured the MVNOs made more sense for you, but just threw the Gophone plans in there as an FYI. If you have T-Mobile coverage and don't spend a lot of time talking, you might also check out T-mobile's $30/month non-contract plan with unlimited text and data, but only 100 minutes talk. Again, just pointing out, not endorsing.
     
  8. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    If t mobile has a plan like that, im all for it. I hardly ever talk on the phone, but I text and browse all the time. If I could have a link, that would be great. And also I believe t mobile has a much wider phone selection than cricket and metro. Thanks! I've been looking for plans like this but apparently I'm not that good.
     
  9. Hook

    Hook Naked and Unbroken

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    This link works for me:

    T-Mobile Pre-Paid
     
  10. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    It looks like the t mobile prepaid doesn't have their whole selection, and the selection there only has super cheaply androids for <120.
     
  11. Hook

    Hook Naked and Unbroken

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    I believe you can pay full price for any T-Mobile phone, or you can simply bring your own phone. In general, the MVNOs also have lower end phones.

    No one said there wouldn't be some work involved in putting together what you need. ;)
     
  12. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    Well.. The discount you get with buying a phone with a service plan is kind of necessary when I only have 120 dollars to spend on a phone. I'll take a look at eBay, but what kind of a phone would be able to be used on t-mobiles 3G network?
     
  13. Hook

    Hook Naked and Unbroken

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    Generally, you only get subsidized phones if you are getting a full-up contract. You are paying pretty much full price for the MVNO phones as well, or close to it. You are just getting low end phones.
     
  14. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    Ah, I see. It's just there were no good deals in my range on that list, or at least from my quick overview. And also, does anyone know what network metro borrows off of? (since apparently cricket = sprint)
     
  15. Adama D. Brown

    Adama D. Brown Brighthand Reviewer

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    MetroPCS actually owns their own network. So does Cricket, for that matter. However, they're not considered "national" carriers because they only cover certain isolated cities, and really nothing outside of those. If you're not in one of their pockets, or you venture anywhere outside it, you'll be roaming onto another network such as Verizon. Here's an example of what MetroPCS actually looks like.

    http://www.mundopcs.net/pix/metro.jpg

    And Cricket:

    http://www.cellularmaps.com/image/cricket_3g_10d.jpg

    These carriers have a small chunk of their own network, and rely on deals with major carriers to support their users anywhere else. A true MVNO, on the other hand, has no network of their own. Examples of true MVNOs would be Virgin Mobile, Straight Talk, Tracfone, etcetera.
     
  16. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    Oh, well I type in my zip code on metro and it said not supported, even though my area is covered and surrounded by service. If they don't have service, could I just roam and still be fine? Or is roaming edge only? I know for sure I have cricket service at my house.

    Edit: I looked on their coverage map, and apparently I'm under "Extended Home Area"
    Anyone know what that means? I don't want to buy a phone to not have service, I think I might have to ditch metro.
     
  17. Adama D. Brown

    Adama D. Brown Brighthand Reviewer

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    "Extended home area" probably means that you'd either be roaming at home, or that you'd be so close to it that you'd be roaming a lot of the time. It might work, but since roaming costs carriers money, they'll usually terminate someone's account if that person spends too much time roaming. Some carriers spell it out in their terms of service--for instance, Sprint's idea of too much roaming is more than half of your voice usage, more than 800 minutes, or more than 300 MB of data, whichever comes first. Other carriers leave it vague so they can play it by ear.
     
  18. Rambisco

    Rambisco Mobile Enthusiast

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    Ah, thanks for the info. I'll just stick with cricKet then, the huawei mercury seems like a good deal. Virgin also has some good prices, but horrible phone selection/price.
     
  19. bpsekh

    bpsekh Newbie

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    Definitely - the ease of being able to install a new battery is a definite plus. I wonder why Apple is still refusing to do this. It's not like it would even be that difficult to design.
     

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